TT

        TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Filename  Dialogue  Scenario  Trigger Tapes for use with the Epidemiology of...

0 downloads 49 Views 235KB Size
     

 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES 

  Filename  Dialogue  Scenario  Trigger Tapes for use with the Epidemiology of Tobacco Use module  TT‐EPI1  Hey, we’re all gonna die at  Man is lying on a  some point. So what if I lose  patient  a couple of years at the end  examination table,  of my life because I smoke….  talking with his  clinician. 

Solution 

Smokers who make this  statement think that they will  simply fall over one day and die  in an instant. They forget that  smoking‐related illness can  create years of miserable pain  and suffering. 

● First, say, “You enjoy smoking and at this point you’re thinking if you lose a  couple of years, it’s no big deal.”  ● Next (after patient says, “Right”), say the following, “I want you to know the  decision to smoke or quit is really yours. What I worry about is that  oftentimes, smokers don’t just die a few years early. They often suffer from  lung disease, heart disease, kidney disease and the like. Often it is very  painful. I don’t want to see that happen to you. What are your thoughts?”  ● Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long‐term benefits to health. It is  never too late to quit and incur benefits, but sooner is better. Smoking  reduces lifespan but also significantly reduces quality of life. It also is  expensive to smoke, and the cost of treating tobacco‐related diseases can be  significant.   ● First, say, “You’re surprised to find out that snuff is actually harmful, too.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Snuff and other smokeless products  can cause cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus and pancreas, along with  gum disease, tooth decay, and tooth loss. What are your thoughts about not  using any tobacco product? I would like to help you quit.”  ● There is no safe form of tobacco. All tobacco naturally contains many toxins,  including significant numbers of cancer‐causing substances.   ● Smokeless tobacco products are likely less harmful than combustible forms of  tobacco, but they are not harmless and do lead to cancer. Smokeless tobacco  use also contributes to oral disease (leukoplakia, gum disease, tooth decay  and tooth loss).   ● First, say, “You care about your daughter and you don’t want to see her  asthma flare up, so you smoke outside and not in the house.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Would you mind if I share a few  thoughts with you and you tell me what you think?”  ● If the patient says, “Yes, but I’m not ready to quit” or “OK,” say the  following, “I know that the decision to smoke or quit is yours. I like that you  want to do what’s best for your daughter. Even though you smoke outside,  the smoke from the cigarette can get on your clothes and skin. If you hold or  hug your daughter, this residue can irritate her lungs and trigger an asthma  attack. Her lungs are just so much more sensitive than ours. What do you  think of all of this?”  ● Smoke can stay on clothes and hair for hours after smoking. This smoke can  irritate a child’s lungs and induce an asthma attack. 

TT‐EPI2 

But I thought snuff was safe.  That’s why I switched!   

Man is lying on a  patient  examination table,  talking with his  clinician, who is  wearing a mask  and is looking in  his mouth. 

Many smokers are switching to  spit tobacco under the  mistaken impression that it is a  safe alternative to smoking. 

TT‐EPI3 

Oh, but I don’t smoke  around her. I always smoke  outside at home…because of  her asthma. 

Mother and child  are in a patient  examination  room, talking to  the child’s  clinician. 

Smokers often do not realize  the lingering effects of the  smoke on clothing, hair, etc.  

Page 1 of 19 

 

Problem 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐EPI4 

I’d like to quit smoking, but  it’s probably too late for me.  I’m sure the damage has  already been done. 

Man is sitting on a  patient  examination table,  talking with his  clinician. 

Many individuals over age 40  think that the damage done to  the body from smoking is  beyond repair. They think,  What’s the point of quitting? 

TT‐EPI5 

I already have cancer.  What’s the point in quitting? 

Hospital room 

Many cancer patients think  that they are near the end of  their lives so “why not enjoy  myself.” They see no point in  quitting smoking. 

TT‐EPI6 

So, I’m going to be miserable  N/A  enough recovering from this  surgery. Why would I want  to make it worse by quitting  now? 

Page 2 of 19 

 

 

These patients feel that they  will inevitably go through  significant physical withdrawal  when quitting. 

Solution  ● If an individual smokes outside but near an open window or door, the smoke  can still enter their home. Although they aren’t smoking near their child, it can  still cause harm.  ● First, say, “Actually, I have some good news. It’s never too late to quit.  Quitting and staying quit can allow your body to begin to make positive  physical changes to improve your health. What do you think about that?  ● It is never too late to quit smoking. Many of the positive physical changes that  occur as a result of quitting happen within weeks or months, and research  shows that even people in their 70s and 80s benefit from quitting.  Furthermore, even if someone has a smoking‐related illness, quitting can  reduce the rate of disease exacerbation.  ● First, say, “Things seem pretty bad (hopeless) because you already have  cancer, so why give up smoking at this point?”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “You raise an important question. We  know that even though you already have cancer, if you quit smoking, it can  help your treatment (chemo, radiation) work more effectively. Smoking also  interferes with and can impact the success of surgery if it is needed. Finally,  smoking exposes your body to cancer causing chemicals which can increase  the chances of additional tumors. I know this is a lot. What are your  thoughts?”  ● Smoking negatively impacts the success of surgery, chemotherapy, and  radiation treatment. Likewise, continuing to expose the body to the cancer  causing chemicals in tobacco significantly increases the chances of secondary  tumors occurring.  ● Many patients who make this statement are focusing on dying. Help refocus  these patients on quality of life and how continued smoking can negatively  impact their ability to engage in everyday activities. Remind these patients  that a cancer diagnosis is not necessarily a death sentence.  ● First, say, “You’re thinking that smoking will help you feel less miserable  after surgery. You worry about going through withdrawal.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I sure don’t want you to go through  withdrawal symptoms on top of surgery. Your doctor is going to want you to  stop smoking before surgery, because smoking can make surgery  riskier…and you can’t smoke in the hospital. I have a number of medications  that are effective for quitting that will really reduce withdrawal symptoms.  What are your thoughts?”  ● There are seven effective medications for quitting that will significantly reduce  withdrawal symptoms from nicotine, and these make patients more  comfortable while quitting (or while abstaining during the surgical period, if  the patient has no desire to quit long‐term). 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐EPI7 

I’m only 27…it’s not like I’ve  been smoking that long.  Besides, I only smoke when I  drink. 

N/A 

Many youth and young adults  believe that non‐daily,  intermittent smoking is not  dangerous. Furthermore, they  believe that they can easily  maintain this level of smoking  and never become daily  smokers. 

TT‐EPI8 

What do you mean, you  won’t do my surgery unless I  quit? 

Clinician’s office 

Many surgeons are becoming  increasingly reluctant to  conduct surgical procedures on  current smokers as evidence  mounts about the negative  impact continued smoking has  on surgical outcomes. 

TT‐EPI9 

I really don’t know what one  has to do with the other. I  get so tired of dealing with  this diabetes and people  nagging me about my  smoking! 

Examination room 

Patients do not always  attribute their illnesses (or  exacerbation of their illnesses)  to their tobacco use. 

Page 3 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Reframe surgery as an ideal time to quit. Hospitalized patients cannot smoke  as inpatients, and surgical outcomes can be significantly improved in smokers  who quit.  ● First, say, “You’re fairly young and don’t smoke that often so you’re  wondering, what’s the problem?”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Unfortunately there is no safe level of  smoking. Even people who smoke very little can develop serious illnesses  from smoking. It’s really an interaction between the harmful chemicals in  cigarette smoke and how your body reacts to them. That’s the part that’s  not predictable. Plus, nicotine is addicting. Eventually, if you keep smoking  even though it is only when you drink, your body will want more. I’d like to  hear your thoughts about all of this.”  ● Explain to the patient that there is no safe level of smoking. There are cases of  people in their teens and twenties developing smoking‐related illnesses even  though they have only smoked for a few years or on an intermittent basis.  ● Very few people can “control” their smoking. Almost all individuals start out  as intermittent smokers and quickly become everyday smokers as a result of  the addictive nature of nicotine.   ● First, say, “You’re surprised that I would refuse to do your surgery if you  don’t quit.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Smoking can create all sorts of  problems regarding surgery. Often, more anesthesia is needed, wounds  don’t heal as well after surgery, smoking reduces your body’s immune  response or healing process, and can, in general interfere with surgical  outcomes. This might be a good time to consider quitting for good. I’d like to  help. What are your thoughts?”  ● Surgical outcomes can be significantly compromised if an individual continues  to smoke. Many physicians are reluctant to perform surgical procedures on  individuals who continue to smoke due to the mounting evidence that  smoking can: (a) result in the need for increased anesthesia, (b) reduce wound  healing, (c) interfere with immune response, and (d) negate surgical outcomes  ● Reframe surgery as the ideal time to quit and review available quitting options  at your institution.  ● First, say, “It’s annoying to you that people keep bugging you about your  smoking. It’s enough that you have to deal with your diabetes and you just  don’t see how one affects the other.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Some of the chemicals in cigarettes  actually interfere with your body’s ability to use insulin. Increasing your  insulin use is the whole point of the medication you’re taking. So, smoking  really makes it harder to control your diabetes and increases your chances 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TT‐EPI10 

 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

I heard that vaping is way  safer than smoking, so  shouldn’t I switch? 

Scenario 

Problem 

Clinician’s office 

Patient mistakenly believe that  vaping is much safer than  smoking regular cigarettes. 

Trigger Tapes for use with the Assisting Patients with Quitting module  TT‐ASSIST1  Yes, I smoke. Why do you  N/A   Patient appears to be surprised  ask?  that he’s asked about smoking,  and is not aware of the  importance of quitting. 

TT‐ASSIST2 

Page 4 of 19 

 

 

I don’t understand. How will  a quitline help me stop  smoking? How does it work? 

Woman is at a  pharmacy  counter. 

Patient needs information  about the tobacco quitline. 

Solution  for complications from both your diabetes and your smoking. What are your  thoughts?”  ● Some of the chemicals in cigarettes can affect how the body uses insulin so  there is a direct connection between diabetes and smoking.   ● Quitting will give patients the best chance of staying as healthy as possible  and minimizing the effects of their diabetes.  ● Many patients with diabetes are quite naturally in a negative state of mind,  feeling that they have already given up so many things they love (certain  foods) that they cannot bear to give up anything else. Therefore, focus on  what the person will be getting by not having cigarettes in their life.  ● First, say, “While smoking is much worse than vaping, vaping is not really  safe because the aerosol that people breathe from the device and exhale  contains harmful substances.”   ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “What would it take for you to quit  altogether? I can’t think of anything more important to protect your health.  I’d like to help.”  ● Inform the patient that while smoking is likely worse, vaping is not safe  because the aerosol that the users breathe from the device and exhale  contains harmful substances.   ● Remind the patient that smoking cessation is the most important thing she  can do to protect her health now and in the future.  ● It is difficult for consumers to know what e‐cigarette products contain. For  example, some e‐cigarettes marketed as containing zero percent nicotine  have been found to contain nicotine.  ● First, say, “I take time to ask all of my patients about tobacco use because it  is one of the most important and preventable cause of multiple health  issues. I would hate to see you become ill or cause harm to yourself as a  result of smoking. What are your thoughts about quitting?”  ● Try to figure out the patient’s rationale behind tobacco use by asking, “What  do you think cigarettes provide you?” Clarify any misunderstandings of  tobacco use.  ● Ask the patient for his opinion on health and help him understand the health  consequences related to tobacco‐use.   ● Remember to mention, “We have a smoking cessation program and I can  connect you to this service.”  ● First, say, “You want to make sure that if you use the quitline that it will  actually work.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, explains what the quitline can do that  directly addresses the patient’s issues. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐ASSIST3 

Nah, I think I’d rather quit  cold turkey and do it on my  own. I don’t need no help. 

Man is sitting on  the end of a  patient  examination table. 

Many smokers try to quit  without assistance, despite the  proven positive impact of  behavioral counseling and  pharmacotherapy. 

TT‐ASSIST4 

I’ve quit at least a hundred  times. I just don’t know that  I can stay off cigarettes once  I get home.  

Man is in a  hospital bed,  receiving bedside  counseling. 

Many individuals who have had  multiple relapses convince  themselves that they can never  quit. 

TT‐ASSIST5 

Here's the thing. Every time I  try to quit…I gain a ton of  weight! 

Community  Pharmacy 

Many individuals who smoke,  particularly women, are 

Page 5 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● The quitline is staffed by highly trained specialists, and individuals who enroll  can receive up to 4–6 personalized sessions.   ● Services provided by the quitline includes individualized telephone counseling,  quitting literature mailed within 24 hrs, and referral to local programs.  ● It is a free service.  ● First, say, “The decision to choose a way to quit really is your decision. While  some people can quit cold turkey, they often have a difficult time without  help from medication. Would you mind if I ask you a few questions about  your tobacco use? This will help determine whether cold turkey is likely to  be successful for you. People who use medications are more successful and  more comfortable while they are quitting.”  ● Ask the patient about his tobacco use to determine whether he needs a  nicotine replacement therapy.   ● Smoking cessation regimens cost less than cigarettes.  ● Strongly encourage him to enroll in a behavioral program, which will help with  coping strategy that last for lifetime  ● If the patient insists on quitting without assistance, recommend several non‐ pharmacological options to assist smoking cessation, such as web‐ based/telephone counseling and self‐help programs.  ● First, say, “You worry that if you try to quit again, you’ll fail again and go  back to smoking after you get home. It’s been a vicious cycle.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Quitting is a process. In fact, we can  learn from your past quit attempts…what worked for a while and then what  made it difficult to sustain that. I could work with you and refer you to  professionals who can really work with you and increase the chance you will  quit for good. What do you think?”  ● Encourage the patient to think of quitting smoking as a learning process,  similar to learning to ride a bicycle. Consider saying, “When you learned to  ride a bike, you fell off, figured out what worked and what didn't, and then  got back on. You did this until you were able to ride without falling. Some  people even used training wheels.”  ● Discuss the quitting process and how the patient can learn from past quit  attempts. Consider saying, “Those past experiences were your ‘training  wheels.’ What did you learn about yourself during those attempts? Apply  those lessons now to make this quit successful. Don’t let those past ‘falls’ be a  reason never to try again.”   ● Also, this time they can get more help, e.g. help from 2 professionals, which is  proven to increase the chances of success.   ● First, say, “Sounds like you understand the importance of quitting to your  health. You just don’t want to gain a lot of weight after quitting.” 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem  concerned about weight gain  after quitting. 

TT‐ASSIST6 

But I’m really worried I  might gain weight when I  quit!   

Woman is in a  patient  examination  room, talking with  her clinician. 

Some smokers think that  nicotine burns thousands of  calories and that without it  they will have significant  weight gain. 

TT‐ASSIST7 

I can’t live without  cigarettes. I just can’t! 

Patient with  psychiatric illness  reacts to the  notion of quitting. 

Many patients with psychiatric  illness believe they cannot  function without smoking and  are extremely fearful of  quitting. 

Page 6 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “We can work together to help you  keep your weight off after quitting. I have a number of suggestions that  have been successful for other patients and you can tell me which ones you  would be willing to try.”  ● Encourage healthy diet and meal planning; suggest increasing water intake or  chewing sugarless gum.  ● When fear of weight gain becomes a barrier to smoking cessation, ask the  patient whether she would like to be on pharmacotherapy with evidence of  delayed weight gain, (bupropion SR or 4 mg nicotine gum or lozenge); can also  refer patient to specialist or weight control programs.   ● First, say, “You know that quitting would be really good for your health.  You’re just worried about gaining weight when you quit.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “We can work together to help you  keep your weight off after quitting. I have a number of suggestions that  have been successful for other patients and you can tell me which ones you  would be willing to try.”  ● Acknowledge patient’s concerns. Advise patient to try to put his or her  concerns about weight on the back burner temporarily. Patients are most  likely to be successful if they first try to quit smoking, and then later take steps  to reduce weight. Offer to assist with quitting as well as subsequent weight  maintenance or reduction.   ● Advise the patient that nicotine increases the metabolism only slightly and  that the average weight gain as a direct result of quitting is 5–7 pounds.  Anything over that is due to the individual eating more. Tell the patient,  “Simply walking for about 20 minutes a day will make up for this when you  quit.” Encourage the patient to consider that the average smoker is used to  putting something into his or her mouth 300–400 times a day, and that many  tobacco users miss that when they quit, so they substitute food for the  cigarettes. They end up snacking on junk food all day long.   ● Explain to the patient that many smokers’ taste buds are “asleep” as a result  of the chemicals in cigarettes. When they quit, these taste buds “wake up”  and everything tastes incredible. Because fat gives food the most taste, these  individuals start eating much more fatty food. This contributes to weight gain.  ● First, say, “You can’t imagine your life without cigarettes. Quitting seems  impossible.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I really believe I can help you with a  number of approaches that could help you quit successfully...and improve  your health. Would you be willing to let me talk with you about some  approaches? After we’re doing, if you don’t want to quit, I promise I won’t  bug you. What do you think?” 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐ASSIST8 

I just have too much stress  in my life to even think  about quitting. 

Patient  examination room 

TT‐ASSIST9 

You don’t know what it’s  like…you’ve never smoked. 

Clinician’s office 

Page 7 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Generally speaking, you will approach patients with psychiatric illness in a  slightly different manner than patients in the general population. Because  smoking is viewed by the vast majority of these individuals as a central part of  their life, quitting altogether on a specific day may be untenable and  overwhelming. Therefore, it is possible that a tapering schedule, with an  eventual quit day, may be more efficacious with some individuals within this  population. However, thoroughly discuss the options with the patient before  making a decision about methods for quitting.  ● Individuals with psychiatric or substance abuse problems can quit smoking as  well as the general population, as long as the quitting plan meets their specific  needs.  ● Because many psychiatric medications interact with cigarette smoke, be aware  of the need to monitor drug dosing with anyone in this population who is  quitting. Consider discussing the situation with the patient’s physician prior to  their quit date.  ● Many individuals who say they cannot live without cigarettes literally do  believe it. Therefore, be especially empathic and understanding, and do not  push. However, make it clear that cigarettes cannot help anyone live a better  life, and that the vast majority of the population lives just fine as nonsmokers.  In fact, patients with mental illness who smoke are 2‐3 times at higher risk for  cardiovascular diseases compared to the general population and lose a decade  of life on average as a result of smoking.  The pervasive belief that  ● First, say, “You’ve learned to rely on a cigarette when you feel stressed. You  smoking either gets rid of stress  wonder how you would deal with the stress if you quit.”  or helps the smoker deal with  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I want you to know that smoking  stress prevents many smokers  cigarettes actually can increase stress. I suspect that when you smoke, at  from attempting to quit or  least temporarily, you remove yourself from the stress and feel a bit better.  prompts them to relapse back  It’s not the cigarette that’s reducing the stress, it’s YOUR action that helps. I  to smoking once they have  believe I can help you with things you can do to reduce your stress without  quit.  putting your health at risk. You’ve already learned one…removing yourself  from the situation temporarily. What do you think?”  ● Help the patient understand that smoking does not get rid of stress, it causes  it. Because there is no drug in cigarettes that magically gets rid of stress,  remind the patient that they have actually been the one to deal with their  stress for their entire life. Advise the patient to give themselves credit, not the  cigarette, for successful stress management.  ● Refer patients to local stress management programs, advise them to begin to  exercise, or suggest that they take a meditation class, all ways to effectively  learn to deal with stress.  Many patients who smoke  ● First, say, “You wonder how someone who doesn’t or hasn’t smoked can  think that only an ex‐smoker  help you. How can I possibly know what it’s like?” 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem  can be an effective cessation  counselor. 

TT‐ASSIST10 

What do you mean I can’t go  outside and smoke? 

Patient with IV  pole, in hospital  hallway,  attempting to go  outside to smoke 

Many hospitalized patients  think that they have the “right”  to smoke and that they can  leave the hospital at any time  to do so. 

TT‐ASSIST11 

I get up every morning at  5AM and work out. So  what’s the big deal if I  smoke a few cigarettes a  day? 

N/A 

There is a belief that exercise,  especially aerobic type  workouts, will mitigate the  negative effects of smoking. 

Page 8 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I have worked with a lot of patients in  helping them quit. I needed their help to do that because each person who  smokes is different. I need your help so I can better understand your  smoking habits so we can work together on a quit plan. How does that  sound?”  ● Inform the patient that you do not have the disease/condition you are treating  them for but that you are still able to help them.   ● Remind the patient that helping someone deal with a particular condition is a  matter of education and skill, not about having had that condition yourself.  ● Although you may not have had to quit smoking, you have made some type of  behavior change in your lifetime (e.g., weight loss, exercise, medication  adherence). Relay that experience to the patient and use the similarities  between that and quitting to help the patient understand that you empathize  with what they are going through.  ● First, say, “You’re upset because we won’t let you go outside and smoke.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Smoking has contributed to the  reason you’re in the hospital. I care about the health of my patients. It’s not  ok with me to allow you to do anything that may harm your health while  you’re here. Given that you can’t smoke while you here, what do you think  about looking at this as a great time to consider quitting and improving your  health outlook?”  ● Calmly remind this patient that they are in the hospital to get well, not to  continue to harm himself by smoking. Reframe the hospitalization as the ideal  time to quit and review the options available at your institution to help them  do so.  ● Help this patient to understand how smoking has contributed to his  hospitalization and that permitting him to smoke would be unethical.  ● First, say, “I think it’s great that you’re so committed to working out. You’re  wondering what’s the big deal if you smoke a few cigarettes?”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “You raise a good question. What we  know is that no amount of exercise can counteract the negative effects of  cigarettes…even a few cigarettes. Your lungs, heart, and other organs can  still be damaged by the toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke. You’re  committed to exercise because it sounds like health is important to you. I  hate to see you undue that with smoking. What are your thoughts?”  ● Exercise, no matter what type, does not negate the effects of smoking. In fact,  remind this individual that continued smoking will negatively impact their  ability to exercise by damaging the lungs and reducing available oxygen.  ● Also remind the patient that they have taken an excellent step towards staying  healthy by exercising daily, however, research shows that the best thing to do  for health is quitting smoking. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐ASSIST12 

How am I supposed to  quit…everybody I know  smokes! 

N/A 

Smokers generally have many  friends who smoke. This can be  a significant impediment to  quitting successfully. 

TT‐ASSIST13 

I’m doing good…I only had  one cigarette last week to  reward myself for being quit  a whole month! 

N/A 

A most popular misconception  that ex‐smokers have is that  they can smoke an occasional  cigarette and not return to  regular daily smoking. They  think that they can “control”  their smoking. 

Page 9 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Very few people can “control” their smoking. Almost all individuals start out as  intermittent smokers and quickly become everyday smokers as a result of the  addictive nature of nicotine.   ● First, say, “It’s hard to imagine quitting when so many people you are  around smoke.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “While it seems daunting to quit given  that many people you know smoke, I know many people who have quit  even though they have friends and family who smoke. I have several  suggestions for handling this. I would really like to see you quit. Would you  be willing to hear my suggestions and then decide what you want to do?”  ● Many people have quit smoking even though they have friends, relatives, or  spouses who smoke. Quitting in this circumstance is a matter of addressing  the situation at the beginning of the quit by creating a specific coping plan.  ● Some suggestions for coping with this situation:  – Speak to other smokers and inform them that you are quitting.  – Ask friends not to smoke in front of you or to limit their smoking around  you for at least the first few weeks after you quit.  – Visualize yourself socializing with your friends, having a good time, all  without a cigarette. Then see one of them offer you a cigarette and you  turn it down by saying, “No thanks, I don’t smoke.”   – Remind yourself that just because you see someone doing something, that  does not mean you have to do it.  ● First, say, “Wow…you have been quit a whole month. That’s terrific! How  have you done it? I would love to share your success story with other  patients.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I’m wondering if you would consider  finding a healthier way of rewarding yourself for the hard work you have put  it? I know, it’s just one cigarette. I do worry that one can lead to two…and so  on. Nicotine is addicting. An any inhaled smoke is harmful. What do you  think?”  ● Very few people can “control” their smoking. Almost all individuals start out as  intermittent smokers and quickly become everyday smokers as a result of the  addictive nature of nicotine. Have them review the beginning of their own  smoking history. They almost certainly started out smoking a few a day but  eventually began smoking on a daily basis.   ● Inform the patient that, generally speaking, if a smoker can excuse one or two  cigarettes a day, they can create an excuse to have three or four. This  inevitably leads to a return to regular daily smoking.  ● Use the relationship analogy. “You can’t break up with someone and still date  them once or twice a week and think nothing is going to happen. It’s always  best to make a clean break and be done with it!” 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename  TT‐ASSIST14 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue  The last time I quit, my  depression got worse. I’m  just starting to feel good  now…I don’t want to  backslide. 

Scenario  Clinician’s office 

TT‐ASSIST15 

Hey don’t hassle me about  my smoking, doc! Everyone  keeps asking me if I smoke –  why can’t everyone just  leave me alone?! Look…my  life’s a mess right now, and I  just need my cigarettes! 

Clinician’s office 

TT‐ASSIST16 

But won’t the stress of  quitting increase my chances  of drinking again? 

Counselor’s office 

Page 10 of 19 

 

 

Problem  Patients often understand the  link between smoking and  depression and fear that  quitting will impact their  depression. 

Solution  ● First, say, “You’re feeling good right now…you’ve taken steps to start feeling  better and you don’t want that to change by quitting.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I don’t want you to backslide either. I  really believe I can work with you and coordinate with your doctor and a  psychiatry pharmacist to develop a quit method specifically for you so you  don’t backslide. What do you think of that?”  ● Inform the patient that the effects of nicotine on the brain mimic those of an  antidepressant. As such, depression can be a very real withdrawal symptom.  Therefore, anyone with a history of depression should quit smoking under a  doctor’s care or with help from a psychiatry pharmacist so that medication  levels can be monitored.  ● However, be sure to emphasize that they can quit successfully without a  recurrence of their depression.  ● From the start, coordinate your quitting program with the individual’s  psychiatrist/psychologist. Pay special attention to the patient’s  symptoms/mood the first week of the quit and at points where the patient is  stepping down on nicotine replacement therapy as these are likely the times  of the greatest metabolic shifts.   Many patients believe they  ● First, say, “I sure don’t mean to hassle you. I do know that the decision to  cannot function without  smoke or quit is yours. I do care about the health of my patients. I have  smoking and are extremely  helped several patients quit who could not imagine their lives without  fearful of quitting.  cigarettes. Would you be willing to talk with me about your smoking?”  ● Impress upon the patient that you are concerned about her health and you  want her to be as healthy as possible. Also stress that you are not telling her  that she has to quit.  ● Understand that many individuals who make these types of statements  literally do believe that they “need” cigarettes to survive. Therefore, be  especially empathic and understanding, and do not push. However, make it  clear that cigarettes cannot help anyone live a better life and that the vast  majority of the population lives just fine as nonsmokers.  ● Ask the patient, “How is smoking making your life better?” or “What benefit  do you think you are getting from your cigarettes?” Then point out the reality  behind the myth of the positive impact they think the cigarette is providing  them.   Because smoking and drinking  ● First, say, “You worry that if you quit smoking the stress will cause you to  (alcohol) are closely associated  relapse back into drinking. That scares you.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I have good news. There is no  for many patients, they  commonly assume that quitting  evidence that quitting causes people to relapse into drinking. The research  smoking will lead to an increase  shows the opposite…that is people who quit smoking are more likely to stay  or return (for those who are  sober. Cigarette smoke actually INCREASES anxiety. What are your  abstinent) to drinking.  thoughts?” 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐ASSIST17 

I have so many problems  anyway another one’s not  gonna make any difference.  Besides how can I quit when  everyone in my group home  smokes? 

Clinician’s office 

TT‐ASSIST18 

Smoking helps me deal with  stress. 

N/A 

Page 11 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Inform the patient that there simply is no scientific evidence to show that  people who quit smoking relapse back to drinking. In fact, research shows the  exact opposite. Individuals with substance abuse problems who quit smoking  are more likely to stay sober than those who continue to use.  ● Encourage this patient to maintain their attendance at (or return to) AA  during the quitting process so that they have a ready forum to discuss any  concerns as they arise.  Most patients who live in group  ● First, say, “It’s hard to imagine quitting when so many people you are  homes perceive it will be very  around smoke.”  difficult to quit when others are  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “While it seems daunting to quit given  smoking around them.  that many people you know smoke, I know many people who have quit  even though they have friends and family who smoke. I have several  suggestions for handling this. I would really like to see you quit. Would you  be willing to hear my suggestions and then decide what you want to do?”  ● Consider telling the patient that you will work with her to create a plan so that  she will be able to deal with this situation and be comfortable in her group  home.  ● Some suggestions for dealing with this situation:  – Have a meeting with the housemates to discuss where they will/will not  smoke.  – Ask the housemates not to leave cigarettes or dirty ashtrays where the  quitter can find them.  – Because this likely is a psychiatric setting, contact the health professional in  charge of the home and discuss possible strategies to help the quitter cope  while in this setting.   – Strongly encourage the entity in charge of the group home to make it  smoke‐free.  Patients mistakenly attribute  ● First, say, “You’ve learned to really on a cigarette when you feel stressed.  relief of withdrawal symptoms   You wonder how you would deal with the stress if you quit.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I want you to know that smoking  cigarettes actually can increase stress. I suspect that when you smoke, at  least temporarily, you remove yourself from the stress and feel a bit better.  It’s not the cigarette that’s reducing the stress, it’s YOUR action that helps. I  believe I can help you with things you can do to reduce your stress without  putting your health at risk. You’ve already learned one…removing yourself  from the situation temporarily. What do you think?”  ● Help the patient understand that smoking does not get rid of stress, it causes  it. Because there is no drug in cigarettes that magically gets rid of stress,  remind the patient that they have actually been the one to deal with their  stress for their entire life. Advise the patient to give themselves credit for  successful stress management, not the cigarette. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐ASSIST19 

Well, my doctor didn’t say  anything about my smoking,  so…it can’t be that bad,  right? 

Examination room 

Failure to address tobacco use  with a patient tacitly implies  that continued smoking is  acceptable. 

TT‐ASSIST20 

What are you talking  about…my grandfather, he  lived to be 95 years old.  Smoked cigarettes from  1925 until he died. That’s  over 70 years that he lived,  smoking cigarettes – at least  2 packs, every day – get  outta here…! 

Examination room 

Many smokers under‐estimate  their risk of tobacco‐related  disease. 

TT‐ASSIST21 

I just smoke with my friends.  It’s not like I’m  addicted…like my mom! I  can quit any time I want. 

Adolescent girl is  talking with her  clinician in an  office setting. 

Many adolescent smokers  believe mistakenly that they  can “control” their smoking.  They clearly underestimate the  addictive nature of nicotine.  Evidence shows that, in some 

Page 12 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Refer patients to local stress management programs, advise them to begin to  exercise, or suggest that they take a meditation class, all ways to effectively  learn to deal with stress.  ● First, say, “You’re thinking that if the doctor didn’t mention quitting, it can’t  be that serious.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I’m not sure why your doctor didn’t  mention anything about your smoking. She may have been very focused on  your heart disease. I do know that smoking can make your condition much  worse. There’s a good chance that smoking was a cause of your heart  disease. Would you be willing to talk with me about quitting?”  ● Unfortunately, many physicians do not address tobacco use for a variety of  reasons (often due to time constraints). However, that is not meant as an  endorsement to continue to smoke. The scientific evidence is very  clear…smoking is the leading known preventable cause of disease and death.  ● Clearly link the presenting diagnosis with smoking. Remind the patient that  smoking is causing their condition, exacerbating symptoms or interfering with  healing.  ● First, say, “Given how long and how much your grandfather smoked, you’re  thinking, what’s the problem if you smoke?”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “You raise a good question. I hope you  live and long and HEALTHY life. I worry that anyone who smokes puts  themselves at risk of heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, etc. While  you are related to your grandfather, people within families vary…different  eye color, hair color, height…you have to decide do you want to hope you  can live as long as your grandfather or do you want to take steps now to  reduce your risks of poor health through smoking. I have met many patients  who started smoking at your age who now have emphysema, asthma, and  high blood pressure, etc. I don’t want to see that happen to you. What are  your thoughts?”  ● Help the patient understand that there is no scientific way to know which  group they will fall into. Remind them that smoking is very risky, and the vast  majority of smokers develop serious health problems as a result of their  smoking.   ● Focus the patient on how these potential health effects could negatively  impact their ability to engage in favorite activities. 

 First, say, “You limit your smoking to time with your friends so right now  

you’re not worried about your smoking.”  Next, after the patient responds, say, “Unfortunately there is no safe level of  smoking. Even people who smoke very little can develop serious illnesses  from smoking. It’s really an interaction between the harmful chemicals in 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TT‐ASSIST22 

 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

So why are you asking me if I  smoke, if you sell cigarettes  at the front of the store?  Isn’t that a little  hypocritical? 

Scenario 

Problem  youth, the establishment of  dependence can occur rapidly. 

Solution  cigarette smoke and how your body reacts to them. That’s the part that’s  not predictable. Plus, nicotine is very addicting. Eventually, if you keep  smoking even though it is only when are with your friends, your body will  want more. I’d like to hear your thoughts about all of this.”   Educate the patient on the nature of nicotine and dependence. Nicotine is a  very addictive drug. Consider saying, “Although you may start out smoking  just occasionally, the body begins to demand more and more nicotine until  you are smoking 20–30 cigarettes a day in order to feel comfortable. This  happens to almost every smoker.”   Research conducted with high school smokers shows that in spite of saying  that they could quit any time they wanted to, more than 85% of 9th graders  who smoked were still smoking in their first year of college, with most of them  smoking much more than they did in 9th grade. 

Community  pharmacy  (probably located  in a grocery store) 

Many smokers do not  understand why they are asked  about tobacco use at the  pharmacy when there are  tobacco products sold in the  front of the grocery store. 

 First, say, “Seems very hypocritical that I would ask you about smoking and 

  

Trigger Tapes for use with the Medications for Cessation Module  TT‐MED1  Why do I need drugs to quit?  Woman is sitting  I don’t like putting drugs in  on a patient  my body.  examination table,  talking with her  clinician. 

Page 13 of 19 

 

this store sells cigarettes.” OR “It is hypocritical. I don’t like that we sell  cigarettes. We don’t sell cigarettes in the pharmacy itself and I make every  effort to talk to my patients who smoke about quitting. Does that help?”  Help the patient understand that questions are being asked because we care  about her health.  Consider having a conversation with the store representatives about taking  tobacco products off the shelves.   Remind the patient that you have a lot of experience with smoking cessation  and would be able to help her if she has thought about quitting. Assess  patient’s readiness for smoking cessation. Let her know that if she changes  her mind, we would be available to help her. 

● First, say, “You don’t like taking any drugs if you don’t have to…”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I wouldn’t want you to take any  medicines that aren’t necessary. Nicotine in cigarettes is an addictive drug  that is going into your body, along with 4000 substances contained in each  cigarette. Hard to believe, isn’t it? I’m asking you to consider taking one  drug for a short period of time so that your body no longer needs all those  other harmful substances. How does that sound?”  ● Explain to the patient that she is putting lots of chemicals in her body every  time she smokes. Each cigarette contains over 4,000 substances, many of  which are known or suspected human carcinogens. Any smoking cessation  medication contains only one drug that has been shown to be an effective  way to help smokers quit for good.  ● Ensure that the patient understands that although nicotine is the addictive  drug found in cigarettes, it is not what causes the majority of negative health                                                                 Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.  Many smokers mistakenly view  the cessation products  negatively while not  understanding the real  negative consequences of the  chemicals found in cigarettes. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐MED2 

All those smoking  medications cost way too  much. 

N/A 

Many patients who smoke feel  that they cannot afford  cessation medications, so they  continue to smoke. 

TT‐MED3 

Aren’t I just trading one  addiction for another if I use  the gum or the patch?  

Clinician’s office 

Many smokers think that NRT  products are as addicting as  smoking.  

TT‐MED4 

Wow. Nicotine patches cost  that much? That’s more  than cigarettes! You know, I 

Community  Pharmacy  

Many smokers believe that  they cannot afford smoking  cessation products. 

Page 14 of 19 

 

 

Solution  consequences of smoking. These health consequences occur from ingesting  carbon monoxide, acetone, and tar, for example, as well as a multitude of  cancer‐causing substances. Thousands of chemicals are found in each and  every cigarette.  ● The vast majority of patients use smoking cessation medications for a short  period of time. These medications have been proven to be safe and effective  through dozens of clinical trials. They help to slowly reduce dependence on  nicotine while immediately eliminating all the other toxic substances found in  cigarettes.  ● First, say, “You’re worried about the what it will cost you to take medication  to stop smoking.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Most of the smoking cessation  products cost between $3.50 and $5.00 a day. This is the same as one pack  of cigarettes. In a short time, you will no longer need to smoke, and you  won’t have to spend money on either cigarettes or medicine to quit. And  this doesn’t even include the long‐term costs of illnesses that are caused by  smoking. Where does this leave you now regarding the cost of quitting?”  ● Do the math with the patient. Determine how much the smoker spends in a  year on cigarettes and show them how much they will save if they quit.  ● Remind the patient that although they perceive the products as being  expensive, use is only for a short period of time, unlike continued smoking.   ● First, say, “That’s a really good question. Nicotine from smoking reaches the  brain in 11 seconds. Nicotine from all the gums and patches, for example,  take five minutes to six hours to reach their peak levels. It’s the SPEED that  nicotine reaches the brain through smoking that causes the addiction. The  medicines provide much lower levels of nicotine at a much slower rate.  These products greatly improve the chances of quitting successfully. And,  they are only used for a short time. What do you think of all this?”  ● Help the patient understand that the nicotine in all forms of nicotine  replacement therapy is delivered to the body in a much different way than it  is from smoking. It is the speed at which the nicotine from smoking reaches  the brain that promotes addiction. Additionally, NRT provides much lower  levels of nicotine than does smoking. Because the NRT products deliver much  lower amounts of nicotine at a much slower rate than smoking, they have  very low addictive potential.  ● Remind the patient that using NRT doubles ones chances of quitting  successfully and that it is only to be used for a short period to time.  ● First, say, “You’re worried about how much patches cost.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say. “Most of the smoking cessation  products cost between $3.50 and $5.00 a day. This is the same as one pack  of cigarettes. In a short time, you will no longer need to smoke, and you 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue  just don’t have that kind of  money. 

Scenario 

Problem 

TT‐MED5 

Hmm. Is it safe to use the  patch and the gum at the  same time? 

Community  pharmacy  

Many smokers are not aware of  the fact that cessation products  can be used concurrently. 

TT‐MED6 

But I’ve tried  everything…none of these  quit smoking medicines ever  worked for me.  

Clinician’s office 

Some smokers believe that  cessation products are not  effective.  

TT‐MED7 

So…what do you think about  e‐cigarettes for quitting? 

Community  pharmacy  

Many smokers believe that e‐ cigarettes are less harmful than  cigarettes and consider them as 

Page 15 of 19 

 

 

Solution  won’t have to spend money on either cigarettes or medicine to quit. And  this doesn’t even include the long‐term costs of illnesses that are caused by  smoking. Where does this leave you now regarding the cost of quitting?”  ● Remind the patient that cessation products actually cost less than smoking a  pack per day.   ● Help the patient understand that smoking continuously would potentially cost  more than short‐term use of cessation products. Go ahead and calculate the  estimated cost of smoking and show the patient how much money she can  save by quitting. Remind the patient that she will be saving a lot of money in  the long run.  ● Consider saying. “If it is too much for you to pay initially, what is your thought  on asking your family and friends to donate a few dollars?”  ● First, say, “Yes it is. I want to assure you that taking the two together is very  safe. In fact, recent studies show that combining medicines has a higher  success rate. The patch is long acting, and the gum helps with cravings that  may come up. They work together. How does that sound to you?”  ● Explain to the patient that both products can be used at the same time and is  more effective when used in combination. Nicotine gum can help relieve  situational cravings for patients who are using patches for smoking cessation.   ● First, say, “Seems like you’ve tried everything, and nothing has worked.  You’re not sure if you want to try again.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I want to help make sure that  anything that you try really works for YOU. In order to do that and  understand better why these medicines didn’t work for you, I need to ask  you some questions. Would that be ok?” Then see below.  ● Explore how the medications were used—what medication(s), what strengths,  how used, and duration of use.  ● Ask the patient what he has tried in the past and clarify any  misunderstandings. Some patients could be using the cessation products  incorrectly or less frequently than needed.  ● Reflect on the fact that “You’ve been frustrated with the fact that they  haven’t worked for you in the past. If you don’t mind me asking, what have  you tried in the past and how have you used them?  ● Make sure that the patient understands how to use each of these cessation  products.   ● Consider asking, “What are your expectations for these products you have  tried?” These medications are used to prevent withdrawal rather than treat it  when it happens because they don’t work as fast.  ● This is straight forward information provision, a motivational interviewing  response is not needed. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem  an option for smoking  cessation. 

TT‐MED8 

Chantix? Isn’t that the drug  with all the horrible side  effects? 

Clinician’s office 

Many smokers feel nervous  about the side effects  associated with Chantix. 

TT‐MED9 

Doing great…haven’t  smoked in a week. But I’m  having a hard time sleeping.  Do you think that’s the  Chantix?  

Could be  anywhere, pt is  calling to  clinician’s office 

Patient suspects his difficulty  sleeping is due to use of  Chantix. 

Page 16 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● Although traditional cigarettes are likely much more harmful, explain to the  patient that e‐cigarettes also contain harmful products that can negatively  impact health. We also don’t know about the long term effects. These  products are likely less harmful, but not safe.  ● Ask patient what her goal is. Is it to get off of tobacco? Or nicotine altogether?  Discuss the risks associated with dual use.  ● Consider saying, “I am glad that you have given some thought to quitting  smoking. E‐cigarettes are not proven for quitting, however, there are seven  FDA approved cessation products available that can help smoothen the  process for you. Would you like to learn more about these options?”  ● Talk about non‐pharmacological options that can also be very helpful in the  process of quitting.  ● First, say, “Sounds like you’re worried about using Chantix."  ● NEXT – see below. Find out what the patient has heard specifically.  ● “Which side effects are you referring to?”  ● Address the FDA’s removal of the black boxed warning. There was a very large  research study conducted showing that the neuropsychiatric side effects are  not due to the drug itself. A similar number of people on the placebo  experienced similar effects. That quite possibly is the side effect of quitting  smoking.   ● Remind the patient that there are different options available. Involve the  patient in the decision‐making process and help him choose a product that  suits him well. Introduce non‐pharmacological approaches to the patient.   ● First, say, “First of all, that’s great about not having smoked for a week!  Sorry to hear you’re having trouble sleeping. Let’s see if we can figure out  what’s going on. In order to do that I need to ask you a few questions. Is  that ok?” Then see below.  ● Ask the patient to provide more information on his sleeping problem. e.g.  “How long have you been experiencing this? When have you started to take  Chantix? What are the s/sx? ‐ insomnia, abnormal dreams?”  ● Offer to review his medication therapy to exclude other factors that could  contribute to his sleeping problem.  ● Inform the patient that sleep disturbances are one of the common side effects  from Chantix. However, the insomnia is usually temporary. If symptoms  persist, he should notify his health care provider.  ● Talk about caffeine intake, excess caffeine and smoking has an interaction,  reduce intake to half and not drink any after lunch time if they sleep at normal  time.   ● Counsel on lifestyle changes, consider taking the second dose earlier or even  skip the last dose if none of the above worked. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename  TT‐MED10 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue  First I hear that Chantix is  bad. Now you’re saying it’s  OK. What gives? 

Scenario  Clinician’s office 

Problem  Patient is hearing different  information on Chantix, and  asks for clarification.   

TT‐MED11 

The patient in room 207 has  Hospital  a nicotine patch ordered.  But they were admitted for a  heart attack. Isn’t the patch  contraindicated in a patient  with a recent MI? 

Physician questions the use of  nicotine patch in a patient with  recent MI. 

TT‐MED12 

Is it really OK to use the  patch and the nicotine  lozenge at the same time?  That doesn’t sound safe. 

Clinician’s office 

Patient doubts the safety of  using two forms of NRT at the  same time. 

TT‐MED13 

Two of my friends quit by  vaping. Why won’t you  recommend it? 

Clinician’s office 

Patient thinks vaping is a good  smoking cessation tool,  because,e her friends quit by  vaping. 

Page 17 of 19 

 

 

Solution  ● First, say, “You’re hearing conflicting information about Chantix and that has  you worried about whether you should use it.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “Please tell me a bit more about what  you have heard so that I can address specific issues for you.”  ● Ask about the patient’s concerns, why he thinks Chantix is bad, and would go  from there.  ● If the patient is concerned about neuropsychiatric symptoms/suicide risk, ask  about his medical history; Advise to use with caution or adjust current  medication therapy.  ● If the patient still seems to be hesitant trying Chantix, ask what his  expectations are towards pharmacotherapy, and involve the patient in  selecting the product.   ● First say to the physician, “You’re concerned about the use of a patch with a  patient with a recent MI.” Wait for a response then simply provide the  information below.  ● Tell the physician that underlying cardiovascular disease is not an absolute  contraindication to NRT, but he is right that we should use it with precaution.  ● Inform the physician that NRT products may be appropriate for patients under  medical supervision.  ● Review the patient case or conduct a patient interview and see how patient is  doing with the nicotine patch. Can assess whether to continue the patch  afterwards.  ● Also confirm the strength the patch is matched with the previous cigarette  use.   ● First, say, “You’re worried about getting too much nicotine by using the  patch and lozenge together.”  ● Next, after the patient responds, say, “I want to assure you that taking the  two together is very safe. In fact, recent studies show that combination  therapy has a higher success rate. The patch is long acting, and the lozenge  is short acting. They work together. How does that sound to you?  ● Assure that the combination pharmacotherapies are regimens with enough  evidence to be recommended first line. Recent studies even showed pts on  combination therapy has a higher success rate.  ● The product consists of a long‐acting (patch) and a short acting (lozenge)  formulation.   ● The patch produces relatively constant levels of nicotine, while the lozenge  allows for acute dose titration as needed for situational cravings.  ● First, say, “Vaping seems like a good idea, because a few of your friends quit  that way.”  ● Next, simply provide the information below. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Filename 

TOBACCO TRIGGER TAPE SYNOPSES    Dialogue 

Scenario 

Problem   

TT‐MED14 

Hi. This is Veronica Ward. I  Woman calls her  was in last week, and you  clinician from her  helped me with the nicotine  office phone.  patch. I’ve been  wondering…ever since I  started using it, I’ve been  having a hard time sleeping  at night. Do you think it’s the  patch or something else? 

A side effect of the nicotine  patch is difficulty sleeping.  

TT‐MED15 

Now…why would I want to  put nicotine in my body if I  wanted to quit smoking? 

Customer wants to know the  rationale behind using NRT  during the quitting process. 

Page 18 of 19 

 

 

Community  Pharmacy 

Solution  ● Let her know that she can certainly try on her own way; however, vaping is  not FDA‐approved for cessation so it is not recommended for quitting at this  time.   ● Educate the patient that there are many unknowns about vaping, including  what chemicals make up the vapor and how they affect physical health over  the long term.  ● Ask her what her goal is—to get off of nicotine or tobacco? If tobacco, this  might help, but it is not harmless. And she might become a life‐long vaper as a  result.   ● This one is straightforward regarding the questions and information below.  You might start with, “Sorry you’re having a hard time sleeping. Let’s see if  we can figure out what’s going on. In order to do that I’d like to ask you a  few questions. Is that ok?”  ● Confirm that the patch is being worn for 24 hours.  ● If the patient is wearing the patch for 24 hours, it might be contributing to the  sleep disturbance. Recommend that she remove it before bedtime only if  cutting caffeine didn’t help.  ● Assess for symptoms of nicotine excess. If such symptoms are present, select  a lower‐dose patch. Ask the patient about concurrent tobacco use while on  treatment.  ● Assess the patient's use of caffeine late in the day. Smoking cessation leads to  an estimated 56% increase in caffeine levels.   ● Ask the patient to contact you again if she experiences further difficulties  sleeping.  ● First, say, “That’s a great question. Nicotine from smoking reaches the brain  in 11 seconds. Nicotine from all smoking cessation products take five  minutes to six hours to reach their peak levels. It’s the SPEED that nicotine  reaches the brain through smoking that causes the addiction. The nicotine  products provide much lower levels of nicotine and at a much slower rate.  They reduce physical withdrawal symptoms and make you more  comfortable while you are quitting. These products greatly improve the  chances of quitting successfully. And, they are only used for a short time.  What do you think of all this?”  ● NRT reduces physical withdrawal symptoms, and eliminates the immediate,  reinforcing effects of nicotine that is rapidly absorbed via tobacco  ● It allows her to focus on behavioral and psychological aspects of tobacco  cessation.  ● Makes patients feel more comfortable while quitting.  ● Let the patient know that NRT is not the only option to aid in the process.  There are always non‐pharmacologic methods (counseling groups, quitline…)  and other types of drugs (varenicline, bupropion SR) if she would like to try. 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. 

 

Page 19 of 19 

 

                                                               Copyright © 1999‐2019 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.