2016 March

New Zealand Psychological Society Te Rōpū Mātai Hinengaro o Aotearoa CONNECTIONS In this issue NZPsS News - CLICK to ac...

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New Zealand Psychological Society Te Rōpū Mātai Hinengaro o Aotearoa

CONNECTIONS In this issue NZPsS News - CLICK to access • • • • • •

Professional Development Institute and Branch news Media Release NZPsS signs MOU with the New Zealand Red Cross Farewell to Anne Cameron Dr Ian Lambie appointed Chief Science Advisor for the Justice Sector

Professional Issues • • • • • •

Ethics Matters NZPsS Awards 2016 Royal Society of New Zealand survey Obituary-George Shouksmith Aotearoa New Zealand loses a leader with immense mana The Impact of Austerity Measures

Student Space •

From your Student Rep

NZPsS 2016 Conference Members in the News Membership Notices News Bytes & Resources Other PD Opportunities Request for Assistance Events Calendar Advertising Workshop flyers

NZPsS NEWS Professional Development The NZPsS offers a range of professional development opportunities which will assist you to meet the New Zealand Psychologists Board requirements that you maintain competence through ‘lifelong continuous learning and improvement- click for a full list of the Core Competencies- for the Practice of Psychology in New Zealand http:// www.psychologistsboard.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=315 To assist you to plan your professional development for 2016, we note some of the areas of competency that the following professional development opportunities below relate to.

Individuals and communities sharing trauma: Social support as a keystone of coping and communal resilience - presented by Krys Kaniasty, USA Christchurch 15 March and Auckland 23 March See the flyer on page 16

Krys Kaniasty’s workshop relates to a number of core competencies including increasing understanding of working with individuals within a community context and the ways in which social support can assist individual resilience. See NZPB core competencies- professional and community relations, consultation, collaboration

To Te Whare Tapa Whā and Beyond: Making sure you went to Spec Savers - presented by Lisa Cherrington Auckland 14 April, Wellington 20 April, Christchurch 27 April 2016 See the flyer on page 18 Lisa Cherrington’s workshop will relate to core competencies concerned with diversity, culture and Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the knowledge, skills and attitudes that assist in the provision of culturally safe practice.

March/Poutū-te-rangi 2016

The NZPsS & ACC are jointly hosting: Introduction to Working with Clients with Sexual Violence Trauma- presented by Kim McGregor Auckland 7 April, Wellington 11 April, Christchurch 18 April See the flyer on page 20 The content of Kim McGregor’s workshop relates to a broad range of core competencies including those associated with the knowledge base required for working with clients with sexual violence trauma, and the planning, design and provision of services.

ICP & NZPsS hosted workshop: Worried Sick? Extending the application of cognitive behavioural approaches from health anxiety to medically unexplained symptoms and long term medical conditions. - presented by Paul Salkovskis, UK Auckland on Friday 1 July and Christchurch on Monday 4th July See the flyer on page 22 Paul Salkovskis’ workshop relates to core competencies which include augmenting knowledge of theoretical perspectives, models of change and evidence-based decision making.

Conference workshops, 1 September: “Cut that Out”: Best Practices for Responding to SelfInjury - presented by Jennifer Muehlenkamp Jennifer Muehlenkamp’s workshop relates to core competencies including those concerned with framing, measuring, planning, intervention and service implementation.

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Advanced ACT: Getting Experiential Without Exercises - presented by Matthieu Villatte Matthieu Vilatte’s workshop on advanced ACT focuses on knowledge and competence and in doing so relates to competencies associated with a knowledge-base, intervention and service implementation. Click here for more information about the conference workshops. PLEASE SEE THE EVENTS CALENDAR ON PAGE 15 You can print this and hang on your noticeboard Go to the website for more information about the training and to see updates: http://www.psychology.org. nz/pd-events/nzpss-events or contact Heike at [email protected] psychology.org.nz You can register for all events online.

Institute and Branch News IO-SIG (Auckland) are hosting: Samma Sati Meditation Retreat

Presented by Dr Rawiri Waretini-Karena (Ngāti Mahanga/ Waikato-Tainui & Ngāpuhi Nui Tonu) & Dr Ingrid Huygens (Dutch, Pākehā) Tauranga: Thursday 21 April 9am - 5pm Hamilton: Wednesday 27 April 9am - 5pm

PART 2 Bicultural practice and ethics Presented by Dr Rawiri Waretini-Karena, Dr Ingrid Huygens & Dr Ray Nairn Dates: November 2016 in Hamilton and Tauranga. The flyers will be available soon. We are also hosting a student function at the

University of Waikato on Friday 1 April at 3.30pm. This is an opportunity for community psychologists and students with an interest in community psychology to meet, for students to learn a little about what community psychologists do in practice and about professional aspects of what it means to be a practicing community psychologist. We will also share some good kai!

and acknowledge the valuable contribution Jeanette Berman has made to their success in recent times. Jeanette has provided a valuable link for the IEDP with Massey University, a training provider for the Educational Psychology Training Programme. Jeanette has also given her time generously on the NZPsS Conference Committee, allowing the IEDP to have representation and a ‘voice’ at national conferences. We wish her well in her future endeavours.

ICP

This month the

Institute of Counselling Psychology and the Institute of Criminal Justice and Forensic Psychology co-

see the flyer on page 24

The Institute of Community Psychology Aotearoa (IComPA) is proud to announce

PART 1 Colonisation, Decolonisation & Postsettlement practice

IEDP The Institute of Educational and Developmental Psychologists (IEDP) Committee would like to thank

see Paul Salkovskis’ workshop on previous page.

ICJFP & ICounsPsy

with retreat leaders Jane Davis, Stewart Forsyth & Ian McCormick 15 April (evening) - 17 April in Auckland

Following on from the highly regarded workshop delivered by Dr Ingrid Huygens and Dr Rawiri Waretini-Karena in August 2014 entitled “Rethinking relationships: A strengths-based approach to responsiveness to Māori”, we are hosting two further workshops in Hamilton and Tauranga in April and November 2016.

providing feedback that they found Jill’s take on this topic both excellent and timely. The institutes enjoyed hosting Jill and her husband John (also a psychologist) in Auckland, after which they were headed south to check out the beautiful scenery of Queenstown and Milford Sound.

Sarah Christofferson (Interim Chair ICJFP), Jill Levenson, Serena Walker (Chair ICounsPsy)

hosted workshops in Auckland on the topic of Trauma

Informed Practice in Clinical and Forensic Settings

All Institute and branch events will now also be listed on this page: www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpssinstitute-and-branch-events

Professional Development Database We are establishing a database with members who are interested in presenting workshops/seminars/webinars hosted by the Society. Please contact Heike if you are interested. [email protected]

with internationally renowned expert Dr Jill Levenson from Barry University, Miami. The workshops were well attended and well received by participants, with one

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Media Release The Society commented on the cuts to funding for the Canterbury DHB in a media release. In the release NZPsS President, Kerry Gibson commented… “Mental services are under-funded throughout the country and to cut them further in an area where we know that psychological needs are higher seems particularly short-sighted,” she said. “Recent research has shown that people exposed to the quakes in Canterbury were more likely to experience mental health problems and these effects were likely to be long term” she added. Dr Gibson said the on-going aftershocks in Canterbury, including the recent large ones, meant that people would be likely to experience a re-activation of trauma. This reaction was on top of the long term effects of exposure to the earthquakes as well as to the disruptions associated with these. “Over time these stressors can drain people’s emotional resources and make them more likely to experience mental health problems,” she said. She said, that while some people were able to recover from trauma using their own resources and support from whanau and friends, psychologists played an important role in assisting people to develop good coping strategies that helped them deal with past exposure to trauma and also enabled them to be more resilient in dealing with future stress. “The formal mental health services delivered by the DHB are a vital resource for those dealing with more severe mental health problems”, she added. Read more

NZPsS signs MOU with the New Zealand Red Cross The Society has signed an MOU with the NZ Red Cross to cement the collaboration and cooperation which has underpinned the development of the “Psychological First Aid” (PFA) resource as part of the Red Cross’ psychosocial training programme. The NZPsS has valued being part of

the development of this resource which will be launched in the near future. The two organisations will continue to explore opportunities for collaboration in the disaster response and recovery arena. Farewell to Anne Cameron We sadly farewell Anne Cameron, NZPss Membership Administrator who only joined us in November but has decided that Auckland and her new grandchild are calling. We will miss Anne’s warmth and efficiency but wish her well in her new life in Auckland. Welcome to Kylie Jackson- more in next month’s Connections

Dr Ian Lambie appointed Chief Science Advisor for the Justice Sector NZPsS member Dr Ian Lambie has been appointed Chief Science Advisor for the Justice Sector. Ian trained as a clinical psychologist at the University of Auckland and has worked intensively with adolescent sexual offenders for over 10 years using wilderness based group therapy within a family therapy agency (the Leslie Centre). In its day it was very pioneering work. He would take a group of boys away for 10 days – 2 to 3 times a year. Ian says that this was fun and challenging work as the young people typically had a range of mental health and social problems. It was what I referred to as “psychology in the real world” and while it was not everyone’s cup of tea he loved the challenge and the opportunity to work with the young people in a natural environment. He then ended up going back to University and completing a PhD on adult sexual offenders and male survivors of sexual abuse. The central question being, “Why do some men who are victims of sexual abuse not go onto to sexually abuse others”? Most of his research has been in the area

of youth offenders – arson, violent and sexual offenders and this mirrors his clinical work. The role of Science Advisor is a new one. The team is led by Sir Peter Gluckman who is the Chief Science Advisor to the Prime Minister. There are Science Advisors for Ministry of Social Development, Health, Education, Environment, Conservation, and Ministry for Primary Industries. Ian sees his new role as supporting the use of data to promote evidence informed decision making in the formation of policy. It includes providing strategic and operational advice on science research and science policy issues so that it is meaningful and useful for those implementing such policies in the real world. This will ultimately have a positive influence on practice at the coalface, with the aim of improving the lives of those who come in contact with the Justice sector. In addition, given that he will be working across three ministries, one of his goals is to enhance the use of data and research across all ministries in the Justice Sector, and to work closely with the other science advisors in the social sector (Health, MSD, and Education) in order to promote and develop policies that are informed by evidence to improve outcomes. Given that the vast amount of his experience is working with young people and their whanau, this will be a particular emphasis of the work that he will undertake across the sector. Ian says that” he will be striving for a collaborative working approach across the social sector which will afford the opportunity for our vulnerable communities to be intensively supported in areas such as Health and Education, as well as Justice”.

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Professional Issues Ethics Matters Dr Elizabeth du Preez is a registered clinical and counselling psychologist and a lecturer on the Postgraduate Programme in Counselling Psychology at AUT. She has a special interest in professional ethics and clinical supervision and maintains a small private practice in Auckland. What I have been wondering about during the last month is what the ethical obligations are to respond in a particular way once we, as psychologists, “know” something? There are very clear guidelines on how to act once we have information that our clients are at risk of harm to self, harm to others or harm from others. What about when we gain knowledge through reading something in a newspaper? But first I want to start with some feedback that I received on the ethics column in the last month. Receiving feedback is always rewarding as this is my intention in writing these columns – to stimulate conversation, critical thinking and collegial brain-storming. The feedback in response to my previous column on competence, consent, relationship structure and reflective practice was thought- provoking. I am including a short discussion on this in the current column, with the aim to engage other psychologists in the conversation also about the feedback related to my description of informed consent… (“We often start with a particular intervention after an initial assessment and case formulation, but as client work is dynamic in nature, and the initial presenting problem is often not the problem we end up working with, the nature of the work we do also changes. It is quite common for practitioners to decide in the moment to use a different

model or technique, and inadvertently informed consent for the new or different intervention is not obtained from the client at that point”). The question raised was whether this was perhaps a somewhat modernist approach, not taking the more (post)modern notion of collaborative practice into account. To some extent, I think this is a valid point. My definition errs on the side of caution – of ensuring that we inform our clients, in pivotal change moments, of our thinking about intervention, and to make sure that they agree to something before we ‘do’ it. The alternative would be that we follow the flow of our thinking as it happens, without interrupting it by stopping and discussing informed consent. Do we “do” therapy or is the therapeutic relationship often the “doing?” When and how do we ask for informed consent and what do we consider a change in model or technique that is significant enough to warrant a second or third “informed consent” process with our clients? I don’t have the answers to these questions – ethics is after all also about unanswerable questions - and of course I am hoping that I will have a full email inbox as the month progresses that will help me understand how other psychologists think about this. What I do however know, is that there is an automatic power imbalance between a psychologist and a client because of the structure of the relationship, and because we know this, we have the responsibility to keep this in mind. Our clients trust us and we should do what we can not to betray this trust. Does this mean that we have to be transparent about our thinking all the time and if so, how should we go about it? I would love to hear your opinion on this – write to me on [email protected] Secondly, a particular news story prompted me to wonder how we, as registered psychologists, should/ could respond to this. The news story reported that mental health funding might be cut in Canterbury. These cuts come at a time when people in this area are under significant psychological strain from repeated trauma as a result of the earth quake, continuous after-shocks in the last 5 years, and the effects on their quality of life. I felt paralysed when I read this – knowing that there are both overt and hidden factors at play, including an economic

discourse, a public health system that has worked hard to support the people of Canterbury, and the depletion of the workforce. The New Zealand Psychological Society released a press statement on the 26th of February that stated that, “the NZPsS is deeply concerned about planned cutbacks to mental health services in Canterbury. President of the NZPsS, Dr Kerry Gibson, said that she found it hard to believe that cuts are being considered for these essential services, especially with the unique mental health needs of the area related to the trauma that people have experienced as a result of the earthquakes and ongoing difficulties with the process of the rebuild”. When does this become not only a collective concern but also a responsibility (a word that means the ability to respond)? How can we respond to this situation in the most helpful or most ethical way? How do we mobilise a workforce that has the necessary skill, knowledge and resources, just not in the correct location? Principle 4.1.5 of the Code of Ethics states that “Psychologists have a responsibility to speak out and/or act in a manner consistent with the four principles of this Code if they believe policies, practices or regulations of the social structures within which psychologists work, seriously ignore or oppose any of the principles of this Code.” The Māori proverb ‘Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa’ (Let us keep close together not far apart) is in my mind, the starting point for any discussion. Let us not allow our differences to divide us; let us keep talking to find an ethical response together. Kia kaha to all the mental health workers in Canterbury.

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NZPsS Awards NZPsS Awards Available in 2016Closing date 6 June 2016

interest. This award is open to members and nonmembers of the Society. The award is offered every four years. Click for more information. For more information, contact Pamela Hyde at [email protected]

Karahipi Tumuaki- The President’s Scholarship The Society offers the Karahipi Tumuaki President’s Scholarship which recognises research that is Māori centred and of value to the Māori community. The Scholarship is valued at $3000 plus one year’s free membership of the Society. If the recipient is a Full Member of the Society, the subscription fee will be waived for one year. If the recipient is not a member, they will receive a year’s free subscribership to the Society. This scholarship is offered each year. For more information email [email protected] Download the Application Form

Goddard Early Career Award -Achievement and Excellence in Applied Psychology This award recognises early career achievement and excellence in applied and professional psychology. Recipients need not be current members of the Society at the time of nomination but they do need to be eligible for membership. The award is offered every two years. Click for more information.

Hunter Award The Hunter Award recognises and encourages excellence in scholarship, research, and professional achievement in psychology. This award is offered every 3 years. Click for more information.

C.J. Adcock Award The Adcock Award recognises an individual who has made valuable and significant contributions to scholarship and research in psychology in the past five years in a range of fields of psychology. The award is offered every 4 years. Click for more information.

Public Interest Award The Public Interest Award recognises valuable contributions to psychology in the service of the public

The Royal Society of New Zealand- wants to hear your views- Survey below…. The NZPsS is a member of the the Royal Society of New Zealand (RSNZ) and we are being asked( as individual members) to complete a survey. CEO of the RSNZ-Dr Andrew Cleland notes…. Supporting the professional needs of the research community is one of the Royal Society of New Zealand’s many responsibilities under its Act of Parliament. In the future it is envisaging being involved in broader activity than what it is best known for; recognising excellent research. The Society has a responsibility to be relevant to all researchers, at all career stages (including early career), and those working in a range of employment contexts including Universities, CRIs, independent research organisations, ITPs, wānanga and the private sector. It also wishes to embrace diversity in the broadest sense. The Royal Society wants to hear the views of as many researchers as possible in order to identify the activities that the wider research community would most value. Through the link below you have the opportunity to complete a survey which will take five to ten minutes. I hope that many Constituent organisations will take up this opportunity to assist the Society by sending the survey link below on to your members who you consider it is relevant to. If you do, the Society in turn can better assist the research community. The Society has undertaken to share the outcomes of the survey. You are also welcome to send this email and the link on to your colleagues in the New Zealand research community and encourage them to also complete the

survey. You may also be sent the survey link from other channels – I trust you will not mind this replication as it will help ensure we get as wide coverage as possible.

The closing date is 18 March.

Research community survey: http://survey.royalsociety. org.nz/limesurvey/index.php/346149?lang=en

Obituary GEORGE ALBERT SHOUKSMITH November 2, 1931 – January 20, 2016 Professor Emeritus George Shouksmith, Foundation Professor of Psychology at Massey University passed away peacefully on 20 January 2016. Over his life George has made a major impact on New Zealand Psychology. Professional recognition of his work was his appointment as President of the NZ Psychological Society, Chair of the NZ Psychologist Board, and Fellowships of both the British and NZ Psychological Societies. Other indicators of the esteem George was held in by his international colleagues, was his appointment as a Freeman of the City of York, and his appointment to Professor and Chair of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London which he subsequently declined. After graduating from Edinburgh University he held positions at Canterbury University, and Queens University (NI) and at a relatively early age was appointed as Professor of Psychology at Massey University. After many years as HoD George was appointed as Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences. While George spent most of his academic life in NZ he always maintained a very British sense and perspective on the history of psychology. George had a very productive, fruitful and fulfilling academic career which is very difficult to match. George’s career pathway was unique because while he was building his formal academic career, he was also building a parallel career in the application of psychology in industrial and organisational settings. For example, Page 5

George had major aviation related consultancies with British European Airways, National Airways Corporation, Air New Zealand and more recently, the NZ Civil Aviation Authority. In addition he had many contracts and consultancies with many Government Departments, SOEs, Local Governments and major NZ companies. The experiences gained from these professional consultancies would later underpin the theoretical foundation for much of his work, and for his entire career. At the heart of all his research and teaching, George was essentially a social psychologist, who published on a range of topics. He has published nine books and over 150 journal papers and articles. Not only was he at his best and most comfortable working and researching in the area of industrial and organisational psychology but also he was very much at ease applying both his academic and applied knowledge, in very practical manner. As a result, when appointed to Massey University he created a department of psychology which had a very strong applied focus. George made an applied contribution to the development of professional psychology training clinics, physically located on all of Massey University campuses. George pioneered and strongly encouraged extramural study and as a result many thousands of students who were unable to attend a university campus were given an opportunity to study psychology at a distance. This mode of teaching is now common practice in many psychology departments throughout the world. While George’s academic and professional service is impressive in itself, his contribution to the community is equally impressive. George was a long serving member of Rotary and was for many years was chair of the national scholarships committee. He was also a committed member of the Anglican Church and for over 20 years was a Lay Preacher. He has also contributed to a large number of community organisations. For those of us who were fortunate to know and to work with George, he was a very warm, caring, humorous, generous and outgoing person with a boundless enthusiasm for life, for his work, and, using George’s own

words “his non work life”. For George that meant his family, church and community service. George is survived by Audrey and his two children Andrew and Patricia and five grandchildren. Our thanks to Nigel Long, Ross St George, Cheryl Woolley for this obituary.

Aotearoa New Zealand loses a leader with immense mana Kua hinga te totara i te wao-nui-ā-Tāne. Te tangi o te ngākau, te hotuhotu o te manawa mō te ngarotanga nei. E noho mokemoke tātou te hunga mātauranga i raro i te kapua pouri. A giant totara has fallen in the vast forest of Tane. This is the metaphor that resonates when attempting to offer an accolade a person who has contributed so much to so many. Whakatōhea and iwi throughout the nation are mourning the loss of Dr Ranginui Walker, a pillar of the academic community spanning more than 50 years. Dr Walker manifested ways of thinking, feeling and acting that were accumulated through adroit scholarship coupled with a courageous sense of conviction to advance the development of Māori in all disciplines. These convictions had breadth and depth and consequently earned him a reputation as a human repository of Māori knowledge. While Dr Walker had a long association as a powerhouse academic with the University of Auckland, his writings are required or recommended texts for courses in all places of higher learning in this country. A notable link to the University of Canterbury is that Dr Walker was the biographer of He Tipua: The Life and Times of Sir Apirana Ngata. Sir Apirana completed a BA from Canterbury in 1893 to become the first Māori graduate. Dr Walker was an educationalist and historian, but many psychologists referred to his thinking and theorizing so as to support good practice. The loss of Dr Ranginui Walker is a great one, not only for

his family but the wider community. E te rangatira, whai atu rā i ngā tapuwae ā o tātou mātua tupuna ki te kainga whakamutunga. Ka whawhai tonu mātou.

The Impact of Austerity Measures Last Friday I went to a lecture at Treasury which argued that countries which adopt austerity measures were killing their citizens (see below for reference and link to power point presentation). David Stuckler presented examples such as the rise in HIV infection in Greece as they slash 40% of the health budget. He also proposed that Iceland had fared better as a result of their strong citizenry and the rejection of austerity measures. The data about the failure of austerity measures is convincing but do human beings act rationally and is this enough to create policy change? As Rouf (2015) notes, economic and political policy has not been the usual territory of psychologists and we may not wish to stray out of our ‘neutral’ positions. However, we know that psychology is never value free. Many of the psychological difficulties in which young people and their whānau live is due to their living conditions. Thomas (2014) urges us to become engaged in the matters of inequality in schools: Even before the recession epidemiologists were telling us of the major consequences flowing from the magnitude of income difference, and I have discussed in this article how the dynamics of that relationship work for young people in schools as well as for everyone else. But the epidemiologists’ revelations promote a realisation that the enervating mechanisms which operate to create ill health, anomie or depression operate not just through differences in income, but through other differences also - differences that institutions such as schools can, unless we are very careful, amplify rather than attenuate. p242 The UK’s Psychologists Against Austerity identify 5 ailments that they campaign on with local and national policy makers. Further research is cited from Barr et al Page 6

(2015). (1) Humiliation and Shame - Prolonged humiliation following a severe loss trebles the chance of being diagnosed with clinical depression. Shame and humiliation are endemic in experiences of poverty, which has increased during austerity. (2) Fear and Mistrust - Austerity has been driven through with a politics of fear and mistrust. Loss of trust underlies several forms of mental distress. Low levels of trust increase the chance of being diagnosed with depression by nearly 50%. (3) Instability and Insecurity - Job insecurity, which has increased during austerity, is as damaging for mental health as unemployment. Isolation and Loneliness (4) Austerity has shut down many crucial communal resources. Social isolation is poisonous for mental health and recovery; loneliness is as damaging to health as smoking or drinking alcohol. (5) Being Trapped and Powerless - Long term entrapping life experiences nearly treble the chances of being diagnosed with anxiety and depression. The Aotearoa/NZ context is different, although Max Rashbrooke latest book also documents the rise in inequality in our country. I wondered whether you felt we needed to respond as psychologists and if so who and how? Ngā mihi Quentin Abraham NZPsS President Elect Barr, B., Kinderman, P., & Whitehead, M. (2015). Trends in mental health inequalities in England during a period of recession, austerity and welfare reform 2004 to 2013. Social Science & Medicine, 147, 324-331. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.11.009 Psychologists Against Austerity https://psychagainstausterity. wordpress.com/ Rashbrooke, M. (2015). Wealth in New Zealand. Auckland, NZ: Bridget Williams Books. Rouf, K. (2015). Position paper: Universal psychology under threat? A reflection on how systems changes are impacting on communities, services and applied psychology. [Article]. Educational & Child

Psychology, 32(1), 92-111. Stuckler, D. (2016). The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills, Guest Lecture, Treasury, Wellington 19 February 2016. http://www.treasury. govt.nz/publications/media-speeches/guestlectures/pdfs/tglsstuckler-slides.pdf Thomas, G. (2014). Inequality and the next generation. The Psychologist, 27(4), 240–242.

Media database

We have established a database with Members we can contact to comment on psychology issues when the media makes contact with the Society and require subject experts. If you are not on our database, but would like to be added, we will send you the questionnaire to complete. Please contact Heike: [email protected] psychology.org.nz

Student Space

From your student rep- Michele Blick Kia ora fellow students Thank you to Megan Young (Massey University) for sharing her thesis topic. Megan will receive a psychology book as a thank you for contributing to Connections. There are more books to give away so please email your contributions to me. If you are not sure what to contribute, some ideas are listed below: a) Internship experiences e.g. internship placement, a description of the work that you are doing, your experience of being an intern … b) Thesis topic and outline including the experience of doing a thesis. c) A description of your programme. For example, as an ed psych I am really interested to hear about other programmes. d) Student-related issues Megan Young Technology has expanded the ways in which we can communicate with each other, making it possible to connect with people from all over the world while sitting on the couch in our living room. I am interested in the ways that blogging in particular provides an easily accessible avenue for self-publishing, and particularly in the personal meaning ascribed to blogs with more intimate narratives, such as those of terminal illness. My research is a case study of one such blog and though my findings are still in their beginning stages, the author of the target blog does seem to be gaining some measure of Page 7

control over the uncontrollable by writing about her illness. There are also ideas around the ways identity is challenged and reformed, and in standing as sentinel over important memories. As part of the research, I am writing my own blog*, both as a field text and as a tool for reflexivity. It is my goal in doing so to assist future students with increased understanding around the processes involved in qualitative research. *https://equalsthewind.wordpress.com

Becoming a NZPsS Full Member A number of NZPsS student subscribers will have completed their internship last year. There are many benefits to becoming full members of the Society. These benefits include: • 50% discount on the first year of membership • Being part of a professional community • Access to affordable professional development including the Annual Conference • Access to news and information about psychologists • Being part of shaping the future of psychology • Support to advocate for important social justice issues • Connecting with psychologists working in similar areas through the institutes and branches • Keeping up to date with research through the New Zealand Journal of Psychology and Psychology Aotearoa • Receiving free advice on ethical issues • Access to a mentor if you are new to psychology or New Zealand • Reduced cost indemnity insurance • Links to international psychology organisations such as the American Psychological Association and the British Psychological Society This link provides information about becoming a full member: http://www.psychology.org.nz/membership

Vacancy - Psychology Aotearoa Student Forum Editor- for NZPsS Student Subscribers How about considering the position of student forum editor? Psychology Aotearoa is published twice yearly and includes student contributions. This is an excellent opportunity to gain experience in this area and to build relationships with NZPsS full members and student subscribers. In addition, the student forum editor receives free registration at the NZPsS conference. If you are interested, please contact Pamela Hyde (NZPsS Executive Director) [email protected] nz or 04 473 4883 for more information. Expressions of interest close Friday 31st March.

Find out what is going on in your region - Feel free to make contact with your branch and institute student rep: Branch Student Reps Otago Branch Sabrina Goh – [email protected] Tia Neha – [email protected] Nelson Branch Trish Kennedy – [email protected] Wellington Branch Charlotte Wainwright – [email protected] Maddy Brocklesby – [email protected] com Nick Arnott-Steel – [email protected] Thea Wass – [email protected] Bay of Plenty Emma-Leigh Hodge – [email protected] Waikato Branch Jane Currie – [email protected]

Institute Student Reps Institute of Organisational Psychology Karen Tonkin – [email protected]

Institute of Educational and Developmental Psychology Veerle Van Cooten – [email protected] Institute of Clinical Psychology Kate Ross-McAlpine – [email protected] Parewahaika Harris – [email protected] Institute of Community Psychology Teah Carlson – [email protected] Vacant branch student rep positions: Canterbury Branch – contact Meredith Blampied ([email protected]) Central Districts Branch – contact Barbara Kennedy ([email protected]) Auckland Branch – contact Michele Blick ([email protected]) Vacant institute student rep positions: Institute of Counselling Psychology – contact Serena Walker ([email protected]) Institute of Health Psychology – contact Iris Fontanilla ([email protected]) Institute of Criminal Justice and Forensic Psychology – contact Sarah Christofferson ([email protected] canterbury.ac.nz) Please don’t hesitate to contact me regarding anything that you would like me to share at the next Executive Committee meeting. Ka kite Michele, [email protected]

Check out the HUGE discount on the NZPsS student price for Professional Practice of Psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand NOW ONLY $20!! -go to our online bookstore. Page 8

NZPsS 2016 Conference

diagnostic category for DSM-V. following a six-year process of research and broad She is a founding member of international consultation. Professor Gauthier was the the International Society for chair of the international working group which drafted the Study of Self-Injury, and New Zealand Psychological the Universal Declaration. He has received several awards co-author of a treatment book for his distinguished contributions to the international Society titled Non-Suicidal Self-Injury advancement of psychology and ethics. that is part Conference of the Advances 2016 Annual Jan Jordan - is an Associate Professor at the Institute in Psychotherapy Series. Her of Criminology, Victoria University of Wellington, New 1-4 September research and clinical guidelines Zealand. She has over 20 years experience teaching and are internationally recognized researching in the area of women, crime and victimisation. and have earned awards from Her major research interest is in sexual violence and the American Association of she is a regular presenter on police adult sexual assault Suicidology. investigation training courses. She has published Keynote: NSSI: Beyond Emotion Regulation extensively in this area, including the book Serial Survivors Workshop: “Cut that Out”: Best Practices for Responding in which the survival narratives of women attacked by Auckland serial rapist Malcolm Rewa are presented. to Self-Injury Currently she is undertaking work on a research grant Suzanne Chambers - Professor at Griffith University. She awarded by the Marsden Fund of the Royal Society of is a health psychologist who has worked as a practitionerNew Zealand to explore why it remains difficult to achieve researcher in psychological support for people with substantive change in how women as victims of rape are cancer for over 20 years. She Chairs the Quality of Life responded to and treated. and Supportive Care Committee for the Australia and Keynote: ‘Rape Culture’: Myth or Reality? New Zealand UroGenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group. Sonja Macfarlane - Senior Lecturer in Health Sciences; Professor Chambers has published extensively on the Māori Health and Wellbeing, affiliates to the South Island psychological effects of cancer and is currently leading iwi of Ngai Tahu, and the West Coast (Te Tai Poutini) iwi large scale randomised control trials of interventions that of Ngāti Waewae. Prior to commencing work here at UC, address couple support and sexuality, lifestyle and unmet Sonja worked for almost 8 years as the national practice supportive care needs, and psychological distress in men leader: Services to Māori within MoE: SE. This role also with prostate cancer. enabled her to participate in research and publishing Janel Gauthier - is Professor of Psychology at Laval in the areas of Māori education, health and well-being, University in Canada, President-Elect of the International cultural identity and culturally responsive pedagogy. Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP), and Canadian Matthieu Villatte - PhD is a Research Scientist and Clinical Delegate to the International Union of Psychological Trainer at the Evidence-Based Practice Institute of Seattle, Science (IUPsyS). He has published over 100 scientific WA in the United States. He obtained his doctoral degree papers and book chapters on the applications of in France, with an emphasis on Relational Frame Theory behavioural, cognitive, and social psychology to mental (a branch of contextual behavioral science studying health. Since 2002, ethics has become the main focus of language and cognition), and completed a post-doctoral his research and writings. His most recent achievement fellowship at the University of Nevada, Reno under the involves the development of the Universal Declaration mentorship of Steven Hayes, PhD. He is the co-author of Ethical Principles for Psychologists, which was of the first manual published in French on Acceptance unanimously adopted by IUPsyS and IAAP in 2008

Mā te mahi kakama, kō atu Where: WELLINGTON, Massey University Thursday 1st to Sunday 4th September Thursday is the pre-conference workshop day

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Call for submissions is now open Please read the submissions guidelines Closing date for submissions is 1 May 2016. Confirmed keynote speakers: Jennifer Muehlenkamp - is a clinical psychologist and associate professor at University of Wisconsin -Eau Claire. She specializes in understanding and preventing suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury in youth. She has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on selfinjury and suicide in adolescents and college students, some of which have informed the non-suicidal self-injury

WELLINGTON

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and Commitment Therapy and is associate editor of the Journal of Contextual Behavior Science. His new book, Mastering the Clinical Conversation: Language as Intervention, is co-authored by Jennifer Villatte and Steven Hayes. Keynote: How to integrate Cognitive Change Strategies to Acceptance and Mindfulness-based Therapies? Workshop: Advanced ACT: Getting Experiential Without Exercises Check the website for updates: www.psychology.org.nz/ pd-events/annual-conference

Membership Notices The names of applicants for Full Membership of the NZPsS (and their nominees) approved for ballot, are listed below. Under Rule 11.4, a member who objects to the election of any applicant shall lodge the objection in writing with the Executive Director within 21 days of receipt of this notice. Such objection shall be supported in writing by a second member. An unsupported objection made by one member will be considered only under exceptional circumstances. If no objections are received within the time allowed, these applicants will be confirmed as members of the Society.

Poutū-te-rangi - March 2016 Members’ Ballot Full members CROUCHMAN, Tracey Cambridge Bachelor of Arts (Hons), University of Sussex, UK, 2001 R Black / M Waitoki FOLTUN, Claudia D Auckland B Psychology, West University of Timisoara, Romania, 2005, M Clin Psych, West University of Timisoara, Romania, 2010 S Schreiner / K Gibson LAING, Megan Palmerston North MSc (Hons) Psych, Massey University, 2014, BSc Psych, Massey University, 2010, PGDipPp, Massey University, 2015 K Ross / B Kennedy

Members in the News This section only features members’ articles that have an accessible link. Have we missed anyone? Please let us know: [email protected] psychology.org.nz Margaret Dudley: https://www.maoritelevision.com/ news/regional/dudley-wants-more-maori-clinicalpsychology Neville Blampied: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/ article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11589609 Richie Poulton: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFz GGxZjboo&feature=youtu.be

MOHAMED, Ahmed Dunedin D Phil, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, 2013 G Wallace / J Austin NEPE, Melanie Huntly PGDipClin, Massey University, 2011 J Aitken / J Biswell SEMBRANO, Ana Wellington M Psych, Pontificia Universita, Italy, 2004, B Ed (Ed Psych), Pontificia Universita, Italy, 2001 K Gibson / Q Abraham SEYMOUR-WRIGHT, Belinda Auckland MEd Psych, Witwatersrand University, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1998 D Sanders / G Khatoev SUTZ, Corinne Auckland MSc Clin Psych, Grenoble University II, France, 1991, Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology and Pathology, Grenoble University II, France, 1992 J Thorburn / B Farrell

TE WHATA-MAYNARD, Kara Gisborne BA Psych, Auckland University, 2004, (NZPB reg.psych.) A Barnes / E Daniela WILLIAMS, Catherine Porirua M Ed Psych, Exeter University, United Kingdom, 2007, BSc (Hons) Phys, Plymouth University, United Kingdom, 1994 C Malins / J Scott WOODWARD, Emma Auckland Doctorate in Child & Educational Psych, University of Essex, United Kingdom, 2009, BSc (Hons) Psych, Sussex University, United Kingdom, 2003 M Lunt / A Kliem Reinstated David Harris, Hamilton Julie Brosnahan, Auckland Student Welcomes Helen Campbell, Wellington Kylie Christian, Katikati Erin Cotter, Havelock North Kiri Diamond, Tauranga Erin Dobson, Christchurch Judith Elben, Switzerland Manatu Fia, Auckland Jennifer Gosnell, Porirua Jane Hyde, Auckland Cathryn Jordan, Auckland Miriam Jun, Auckland Raniera Kingi, Auckland Glorianne Koh, Christchurch Andree Leslie, Napier Anthony Lorigan, Hamilton Gerard Montgomery, Wellington Rachel Rachmani, Te Awamutu Hayley Robinson, Auckland Jacqueline Seymour, Auckland Jessica Sutherland, Wellington Lee Taylor, Auckland Casey Williams, Wellington Olivia Williams, Fielding Lindsay Yeo, Ashhurst Megan Young, Auckland

Institute Welcomes Clinical Psychology Gustavo Restivo student members: Jane Hyde, Auckland Gerard Montgomery, Wellington, Helen Campbell, Wellington Health Psychology Gerard Dolan, New Plymouth Alexandra Leggat, Auckland Amy Hemmington, Auckland (Student Member) Alysha Simonsen, Auckland (Student Member) Community Psychology Mia Nelson, Hamilton (student member) Educational Psychology Heidi Mulder, Te Aroha Jess Sutherland, Wellington (Student Member) Organisational Psychology Academic Member Katharina Naswall, Christchurch Chartered Organisational Psychologist Daniel Ford, Auckland Megan Jenkins, Auckland

Page 10

News Bytes & Resources

likely to lead difficult lives is now available, giving social service providers valuable insights into the issues these vulnerable children face. footprint books Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin 2 March, 2016

Get to know Te Pou’s workforce planning portfolio Led by Emma Wood, the workforce planning portfolio works to promote what effective workforce development looks like. Read a summary of our key work areas and what we are planning for 2016. Source: Te Pou e-bulletin 25 February, 2016

Early intervention in psychosis leadership day Te Pou is hosting their first mental health leadership day on 9 June in Wellington. The focus for the day is early intervention in psychosis. The day aims to bring together leaders in the early intervention sector, enabling opportunities for professional networking and facilitating knowledge transfer. Learn more about the early intervention mental health leadership day.

Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin 2 March, 2016

Report shows huge impact of poverty on education A new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development highlights the negative effects of poverty, showing, for example, that disadvantaged children in New Zealand are more than six times more likely to underachieve in maths than children from wealthier homes. Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin 2 March, 2016

Final data-set enhances at-risk youth profile Further data on the risk factors that indicate children are

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Lifeline Aotearoa investing in mental health Lifeline Aotearoa is opening a Christchurch branch of 0800 Kidsline in May. A free call centre, 0800 Kidsline is a not-for-profit counselling and support service operating out of Auckland. Young people phone the helpline to talk about school issues, friendships, relationships, bullying, depression and suicidal thoughts.

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New Zealand Psychological Society PO Box 25271, Featherston Street, Rendered / Web Use Wellington 6146 www.psychology.org.nz phone: 04 4734884; fax: 04 4734889; email: [email protected] Disclaimer: Publication of material in, or distribution of material with, Connections does not constitute endorsement by the Society of any views expressed. Equally, advertisements are accepted for publication at the discretion of the Editor, having regard to the perceived relevance to NZPsS members of the products or services advertised. Their inclusion does not constitute endorsement by the Society. The Editor reserves the right to edit all copy for publication. © This material is copyrighted to the Society.

To access your 20% member discount off the RRP on the website, simply enter the code NZPFB41 in the coupon code box and add your membership number in the ‘special instructions’ box at the checkout. You will also need these details if you order by phone/email or fax. Contact the friendly customer service team at [email protected] or call +61 2 9997 3973 if you have any questions.

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Request for Assistance Ethics Study: Educational Psychologists and Psychologists Working in Education Have you trained and registered within the last 5 years? Is 50% or more of your work focused on and carried out in schools/educational settings? If so, you are invited to participate in a research project by Massey University masters student Deb Martis who is investigating the ethical dilemmas experienced by early career educational psychologists and psychologists working in schools and other educational settings in New Zealand and Australia. Understanding of these issues will be of significant value to practitioners, students, and educators in informing professional practice. An information sheet can be accessed at http://tinyurl.com/ nzva2rq and the anonymous survey can be accessed at http://goo.gl/forms/99FTtaS6s6. Your unique contribution and participation in this study is much appreciated.

Events Calendar NEW ZEALAND EVENTS *17 March, 2016 Christchurch 12 - 1 pm “Maybe Aretha had it right: The Role of Respect in a Psychologically Healthy Workplace” Dr Darla Day. University of Canterbury, Room 252, Psychology Building *7-9 April, 2016 New Plymouth 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the New Zealand Pain Society Inc. “Surfing the Pain Wave - Resilience”. For more information please see www. w4uconferences.co.nz * 8 April, Massey University, Wellington, Karl Tomm workshops, click here: http://www.massey.ac.nz/?od8395421h *9-10 April, 2016 Wellington, NZCCP Conference. For more information please click here https://dl.dropboxusercontent. com/u/2555332/2016%20conference/NZCCP%202016%20 conference%20brochure%20and%20registration%20form.pdf *19-22 April, 2016 Auckland 10th International Conference on Workplace Bullying and Harassment. For more information see www.bullying2016.com. *5-6 May, 2016 Auckland NZCCP Auckland Branch Attachment Across the Lifespan Theory, Practice and Application -Sarah Calvert. For more information please click here http://www. nzccp.co.nz/events/workshops-and-seminars/attachment-

across-the-lifespan-theory-practice-and-application/ *16 July, 2016 Wellington Advanced Hynosis Training. For more information please email [email protected] *15-16 September, 2016 Auckland. Master Class: Adults and Older Adolescents with ASD Level 1 (Asperger’s Syndrome) For more information please see http://www.mindsandhearts. net/ * 17 September, 2016 Auckland. Emotion Management with Children and Teens with ASD. For more information please see http://www.mindsandhearts.net/ OVERSEAS EVENTS * 4-15 March 2016 Sydney, 17-18 March 2016 Melbourne and 21-22 March 2016 Brisbane Recognising & Resolving Traumatic Stress Workshops. For more informaiton please see http://byronclinic.com/bessel-van-der-kolk-trauma-workshops2016/?utm_source=wysija&utm_medium=email&utm_ campaign=Sept+BVK+Europe+Valid *30 March - 1 April, 2016 Kona, Big Island, Hawaii USA IFTA’s 24th World Family Therapy Congress. For more information please see: http://www.ifta-congress.org/ *31 March - 4 April, 2016 Brazil 2nd World Conference on Personality. For more information please see http://www. perpsy2016.com/ *11-13 April, 2016 Athens, Greece 12th conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology. For more information please see http://www.eaohp.org/ conference.html *27 April, 2016 Manchester, England “Dementia: Quality of Care 2016”. For more information please click here http://www. openforumevents.co.uk/event/dementia-quality-of-care/?utm_ source=P1.0+DEM+QC+DHR+ALL+O%2FC+FINAL+07%2F03&u tm_medium=email&utm_campaign=P1.0+DEMENTIA+QUALIT Y+OF+CARE+2016 *28-30 April, 2016 Barcelona Spain 22nd International Symposium on Current Issues and Controversies in Psychiatry. For more informaiton please see www.controversiasbarcelona. org/en *5-6 May, 2016 Piran, Slovenia. “7th TRIPLE i Conference: Intuition, Imagination and Innovation in Suicidology” For more information please see http://zivziv.si/triple-i-2016/ *5-8 May, 2016 Warsaw, Poland 19th SIS World Congress on Breast Health Care. For more information please see http:// www.siscongress.org/

*11-13 May, 2016 Porto Portugal 5th EFCAP Conference. For more information please see http://www.efcap2016.com *16-17 May, 2016 Gold Coast Australia 3rd Eating Disorders and Obesity Conference. For more information please see http://www.vision6.com.au/ch/11035/2w46swp/1888218/ df6a417s3q.html *17 May, 2016 Manchester, UK. Confronting Online Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. For more information please see http://www.openforumevents.co.uk/event/confronting-onlinechild-abuse/ *1-3 June, 2016 Complex Systems 2016 New Forest, UK. For more information please see http://www. wessex.ac.uk/16-conferences/complex-systems-2016. html?utm_source=wit&utm_medium=email&utm_ campaign=friar16cfp&uid=29790 *3-4 June, 2016 Singapore. the American Counseling Association – Asia Pacific Counseling Conference 2016. For more information please see http://www.aca-apcc.org/ *19-27 June, 2016 Melbourne Australia Comprehensive DBT Training. For more information plesae click here http://www. bpdaustralia.com/new-events/ *14-15 June, 2016 Singapore. 2016 Singapore Conference on Applied Psychology. For more information please see http:// scap.ear.com.sg/ *10-14 July, 2016 Vilnius, Lithuania 24th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development. For more information please see www.issbd2016.com *13-14 July, 2016 Brisbane, Australia Challenging The Mental Illness-Violence Nexus. For more information see https://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/mental-illnessviolence-conference *18-20 July, 2016 London, England 11th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. For more information see http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/ResearchCentres/Centre-for-Applied-Research-and-Assessment-inChild-and-Adolescent-Wellbeing/Child-and-AdolescentPsychopathology-Conference/ *24 - 29 July 2016, Yokohama, Japan. “31st International Congress of Psychology’”. See www.icp2016.jp/index.html for more information. *15-19 August, 2016 Copenhagen Denmark 3rd International Conference on Time Perspective. For more information please click here https://itpnetwork.wordpress.com/ Page 12

Advertising *23-27 August, 2016 Aberdeen, Scotland. 30th Conference of the European Health Psychology Society and the British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology. For more information please see http://www.ehps2016.org/index.html 26-28 October, 2016 Dublin, Ireland. 5th International Conference on Violence in the Health Sector. For more information please see http://www.oudconsultancy.nl/ dublin_5_ICWV/violence/registrationandp.html * 7-11 November, 2016 Port au Prince, Haiti. For more information please see http://www.crcp2016.org/ *July 2017 - June 2017 Indigenous Conferences, please see http://www.indigenousconferences.com/ for conference details including dates and locations

PD Opportunities NEW TO NZ - Training in the Developmental Model: Learn how to integrate attachment theory, differentiation and neuroscience in building better relationships The Developmental Model offers a comprehensive overview of how and why people have relationship difficulties and a raft of practical tools to help them. Compatible with all other models of relationship therapy and suitable for both experienced and novice therapists, individual AND couple therapists. Trainers: Paula Dennan and Nic Beets, both Clinical Psychologists, who have over 20 years experience in working with relationship issues in a variety of models and are endorsed by the Couples Institute. The Foundation of Relationship Therapy: Level 1 The Developmental Model Auckland Dates: 29 February &1 March Venue: Sorrento, One Tree Hill, Auckland Cost: $385 +GST Discounted price for NZPsS members Information and Bookings: http://www. relationshiptherapyinc.com

Busy private practice of clinical psychologists and allied professionals We have several half days of consultation space available ready to be filled The practice has a fulltime office manager and a collegial atmosphere Rent includes some administration and secretarial services LOCATION: Beautiful old house at 88 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, convenient to the Three Lamps area and the Link bus route, etc If interested, for further details please contact: Gail Ratcliffe Eileen Swan Traude Leibbrand Sarah Calvert Ph: 918-5977 Email: [email protected]

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2016 Trauma Education

Leah is a Sydney-based doctorallevel clinical psychologist with 20 years of clinical and teaching expertise in CBT and traumatology

presented by Dr Leah Giarratano

Two highly regarded CPD activities for all mental health professionals: 14 hours for each activity These workshops are endorsed by the, AASW, ACA and ACMHN

Clinical skills for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (Treating PTSD) This two-day (8:30am-4:30pm) program presents a highly practical and interactive workshop (case-based) for treating traumatised clients; the content is applicable to both adult and adolescent populations. The techniques are cognitive behavioural, evidence-based, and will be immediately useful and effective for your clinical practice. The emphasis is upon imparting immediately practical skills and up-to-date research in this area. 12-13 May 2016, Brisbane CBD

2-3 June 2016, Cairns CBD

23-24 June 2016, Auckland CBD

19-20 May 2016, Melbourne CBD

9-10 June 2016, Perth CBD

3-4 November 2016, Sydney CBD

26-27 May 2016, Sydney CBD

16-17 June 2016, Adelaide CBD

17-18 November 2016, Melbourne CBD

Clinical skills for treating complex trauma (Treating Complex Trauma) This two-day (8:30am-4:30pm) program focuses upon phase-based treatment for adult survivors of child abuse and neglect. In order to attend, participants must have first completed the ‘Treating PTSD’ program. The workshop completes Leah’s four-day trauma-focused training. The content is applicable to both adult and adolescent populations. The program incorporates practical, current experiential techniques showing promising results with this population; techniques are drawn from EFTT, Metacognitive Therapy, Schema Therapy, attachment pathology treatment, ACT, CBT, and DBT. 7-8 July 2016, Sydney CBD

28-29 July 2016, Perth CBD

14-15 July 2016, Melbourne CBD

4-5 August 2016, Adelaide CBD

21-22 July 2016, Brisbane CBD

11-12 August 2016, Auckland CBD

Please note that our workshops dates have changed and dates on this page are current at the time of publication so please check our website to ensure they are current before booking

Program Fee for each activity is in Australian Dollars (AUD) Travel to Australia $550 AUD (when you email this form to pay for an Australian workshop with a Visa or Master card) $615 AUD or $550 each if you register to both (or with a colleague) more than three months prior using this form $680 AUD or $615 each if you register to both (or with a colleague) less than three months prior using this form Program fee includes program materials, lunches, morning and afternoon teas on each workshop day Please direct your enquiries to Joshua George on: [email protected] For more details about these offerings and books by Leah Giarratano refer to www.talominbooks.com 2016 Trauma Education Registration Form for NZPS Please circle the workshop/s you wish to attend above and return a scanned copy of this completed page Profession:

Name: Address: Phone:

Email (*essential*):

Mobile:

Special dietary requirements:

Method of payment (circle one)

Visa

MasterCard

Name of cardholder:

Expiry Date:

Card Number:

Card Verification Number:

Signature of card holder:

Debit amount in Australian Dollars: $

Credit card payment is preferred. Simply complete the information above, scan and email this page [email protected] A receipt will be emailed to you upon processing. Note: Attendee withdrawals and transfers attract a processing fee of $55 AUD. No withdrawals are permitted in the seven days prior to the workshop; however positions are transferable to anyone you nominate

2016 Events calendar

2016 Events Calendar for NZPsS hosted Workshops and Seminars

1. Individuals and communities sharing trauma: Social support as a keystone of coping and communal resilience presented by Krys Kaniasty, USA Christchurch 15 March and Auckland 23 March 2. To Te Whare Tapa Whā and Beyond: Making sure you went to Spec Savers presented by Lisa Cherrington Auckland 14 April, Wellington 20 April, Christchurch 27 April 2016 3. NZPsS & ACC jointly hosted workshops: Workshop 1- Introduction to Working with Clients with Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Kim McGregor 7 April Auckland, 11 April Wellington and 18 April Christchurch Workshop 2- The Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Eileen Swan July in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch Workshop 3- Bicultural Approaches in the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Julie Wharewera-Mika October in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch 4. NZPsS & ICP jointly hosted workshop: Worried Sick? Extending the application of cognitive behavioural approaches from health anxiety to medically unexplained symptoms and long term medical conditions. presented by Paul Salkovskis, UK Christchurch on Friday 1st July and Auckland on Monday 4th July 5. Free evening seminars: Students Leaving University - to assist students to prepare for the transition from student to registered psychologist. Presenters, Dates and locations to be announced later this year. 6. Conference workshops, 1 September: Jennifer Muehlenkamp: “Cut that Out”: Best Practices for Responding to Self-Injury Matthieu Villatte: Advanced ACT: Getting Experiential Without Exercises

Detailed information about these workshops can be found on our website: http://www.psychology.org.nz/brochures-for-workshops To register please go to: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpss-events/#cid=884&wid=301 or contact the professional development coordinator [email protected] or phone 04 9141983

Workshop flyers

The New Zealand Psychological Society is proud to host:

Individuals and communities sharing trauma: Social support as a keystone of coping and communal resilience presented by Krys Kaniasty, USA

Christchurch 15 March and Auckland 23 March 2016 Natural disasters, technological catastrophes, and acts of mass terrorism and oppression defy geographical, social, cultural and time boundaries. Whenever they strike, predictably or unexpectedly, emerge slowly or suddenly, surround visibly or invisibly, disasters are processes that have dramatic consequences for individuals, neighborhoods, communities, and larger social entities. The crux of disaster experience is the dynamic interplay of individual and collective experiences. This workshop will provide both theoretical and empirical foundations for operationalizing the capacity of a collective to triumph over shared adversities, as based on maintaining and augmenting mutual social support, social cohesion, cooperation and a sense of belonging to a valued social group. Individuals’ functioning in the aftermath of potentially traumatic events depends on their own resources and losses and on the resources and losses of their community. Many disasters initially mobilize affected communities into a heroic and altruistic struggle to fulfill immediate needs, and shield victims from an overwhelming sense of loss. However, this heroic stage inevitably ceases and may not be sufficient to conquer the slowly evolving deterioration of social relationships routinely experienced by postdisaster communities. Thus, in the long run, failure or success in coping with shared trauma depends to a large extent on social functioning. One way of deterring lasting negative psychological consequences of disasters should be through protecting and maintaining communal resilience, defined as the ability to deter insidious erosion of communal connections in the aftermath of collective upheavals.

Specific topics: #1: Social support defined: Distinctions that matter #2: Social support in the context of natural disasters #3: Social support in the context of humaninduced catastrophes #4: Unsympathetic, judgmental, or hostile social environments and coping with traumatic stress #5: Putting it all together: Social support as one of the pathways to community resilience A professor in the Psychology Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Krys Kaniasty is perhaps the foremost authority on post-disaster social support, having written or co-written numerous empirical and theoretical articles, chapters and reports on the topic. He has been selected as Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s 2014-15 Distinguished University Professor. His current research interests are: Social support exchanges in the context of stressful and traumatic life events at both individual (e.g., criminal victimization, unemployment, bereavement) and community (e.g., disasters, acts of terrorism, political crises) levels. Models estimating the role of social support and other



resources as moderating and mediating factors in the stress-adjustment process. Determinants of psychological hardiness and resilience (i.e. successful adaptation) of individuals and communities facing a variety of crises, including extreme stress. Cultural influences on helping behavior, social support, and coping with stress. Application of social psychological principles (e.g., social cognition, attribution) in examining the course of coping with stressful life events.

Start: 9.30am M/tea: 11am - 11.30am Lunch: 1pm- 2pm A/tea: 3.30pm-4pm Finish: 5pm

Online registration available here: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpssevents/#cid=884&wid=301

Venues

Auckland: Sorrento in the Park, One Tree Hill Domain (670 Manukau Road), Royal Oak Christchurch: 9 Maidstone Road, Building: Sonoda - Hinoki Seminar Room, Ilam

REGISTRATION & TAX INVOICE

PAYMENT

All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864

Name ...................................................................................... City.......................................................................................... E-Mail .................................................................................... Phone .....................................................................................

Christchurch - 15 March Auckland - 23 March Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. If your employer is paying for your registration please ensure your payment is referenced with your surname. Cancellation: Up to 14 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 14 working days before event – no refund but named substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified. The NZPsS reserves the right to cancel the workshop, with not less than 10 days notice, should there be insufficient registrations.

I accept the booking conditions Signed ..................................................................................... Date ........................................................................................ Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

scan and email completed form to: [email protected] or fax to: 04 4734889 or post to PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146

NZPsS Member

$190.00

Non Member

$220.00

NZPsS Student

$50.00

Non NZPsS Student

$80.00

Cost (incl. GST) covers: • •

m/tea, lunch, a/tea workshop materials

I have special dietary requirements (please specify).......................................................... Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: New Zealand Psychological Society BNZ, 02-0560-0262471-000 Payment reference ................................... Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

---- ---- ---- ----

Cardholder Name .................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../.......................

The New Zealand Psychological Society is proud to host:

To Te Whare Tapa Whā and Beyond: Making sure you went to Spec Savers presented by Lisa Cherrington Auckland 14 April, Wellington 20 April, Christchurch 27 April 2016 Aim of workshop: What does Buzz Lightening from Toy Story with his optimistic shout of ‘To infinity and beyond’ and the Spec Savers Aerobics television ad where a vision impaired fitness instructor accidentally wanders into the Bingo hall, mistaking it for the gym and then leads a group of surprisingly spritely senior citizens on an aerobics routine set to LMFAO’s ‘Sexy And I Know It’ all have to do with a cultural supervision workshop? By the end of this one day cultural supervision workshop, participants will have formulated their own answer. The workshop is intended for those practitioners who already have a working knowledge of Te Whare Tapa Whā and want to advance their own practice utilising Te Whare Tapa Whā in a meaningful and practical way. In addition, through the use of case studies provided by the participants and adaptation of Hua Oranga (a Māori mental health outcomes measure), practitioners will learn practical skills to enhance their own reflective practice when working with Māori clients and their whānau. Participants will be required to submit a brief case study when registering (no longer than a paragraph) about a Māori client/ whānau they are working with or have worked with. The case picked should be a case the practitioner has identified as: ‘Could have done better but not quite sure what and I am open to some new ideas.’ ‘I’m not too sure if I am on the right road here, would be open to some suggestions.’ “I feel really out of my depth here. What else

could I be doing? ‘or Something else ( for example, no engagement or lack of rapport). Topics covered in the 1 day workshop may include: 1. An overview of Te Whare Tapa Wha 2. Identifying cultural and ‘clinical’ issues using Te Whare Tapa Wha 3. Personal application of Te Whare Tapa Wha 4. Using Te Whare Tapa Wha as a framework in assessment and planning 5. Hua Oranga and reflective practise 6. Exploration of case studies using Te Whare Tapa Wha and Hua Oranga About the facilitator: Lisa Cherrington qualified as a clinical psychologist in 1994 and worked for a number of years in Kaupapa Māori Mental health services in Palmerston North and Wellington. The use of narrative therapies and pūrākau (Māori mythology) when working with Māori are long standing areas of interest. In addition, she has facilitated numerous workshops on the practical application of Te Whare Tapa Whā. Lisa developed and taught the Indigenous Psychology in Aotearoa paper at Victoria University. Lisa has worked part time at Massey University with the Cancer



Psychology Service in addition to providing consultancy services to other organisations such as Department of Corrections and Central Cancer Network. She currently provides training and supervision for Whānau Ora Navigators for Te Tihi o Ruahine and Central PHO. Lisa is also a published novelist, a scriptwriter and Iron Māori/ Iron Man competitor.

Start: 9.30am M/tea: 11am - 11.30am Lunch: 1pm- 2pm A/tea: 3.30pm-4pm Finish: 5pm

Online registration available here: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpssevents/#cid=884&wid=301

Venues

Auckland: Sorrento in the Park, One Tree Hill Domain (670 Manukau Road), Royal Oak Wellington: Mercure Abel Tasman Hotel, 169 Willis Street Christchurch: The Redwood, STYX Function room, 340 Main North Road, Redwood

REGISTRATION & TAX INVOICE

PAYMENT

All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864

Name ...................................................................................... City.......................................................................................... E-Mail .................................................................................... Phone .....................................................................................

Auckland - 14/4 Wellington - 20/4 Christchurch- 27/4 Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. If your employer is paying for your registration please ensure your payment is referenced with your surname. Cancellation: Up to 14 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 14 working days before event – no refund but named substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified. The NZPsS reserves the right to cancel the workshop, with not less than 10 days notice, should there be insufficient registrations.

I accept the booking conditions Signed ..................................................................................... Date ........................................................................................ Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

scan and email completed form to: [email protected] or fax to: 04 4734889 or post to PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146

NZPsS Member

$190.00

Non Member

$220.00

NZPsS Student

$40.00

Non NZPsS Student

$80.00

Cost (incl. GST) covers: • •

m/tea, lunch, a/tea workshop materials

I have special dietary requirements (please specify).......................................................... Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: New Zealand Psychological Society BNZ, 02-0560-0262471-000 Payment reference ................................... Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

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Cardholder Name .................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../.......................

The New Zealand Psychological Society & ACC are proud to host:

Introduction to Working with Clients with Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Dr Kim McGregor Auckland 7 April, Wellington 11 April, Christchurch 18 April 2016 - 9.30am to 5.00pm Due to the interpersonal betrayal and complex effects associated with child sexual abuse (CSA), working with survivors can be challenging. Making things more difficult, many counselling and other courses do not provide specific training for this issue. These factors often leave counsellors and other professionals lacking confidence when working with survivors of child sexual abuse. This one day workshop will outline the prevalence, dynamics and effects of CSA, useful therapeutic approaches and messages from almost 200 Aotearoa/New Zealand survivors of CSA about what they found helpful and unhelpful in therapy. Most frequent comments from participants of this workshop are about counsellors and other professionals feeling “more confident” in their work and “validated” in their approaches. Workshop Outline Introduction to Working with Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse and Clients’ Experiences 9.30 – 10.45 Context – Development of Abusefocused Therapy 10.45-11.15 Morning tea 11.15-12.30 Prevalence, Dynamics & Effects of Child Sexual Abuse/Impact on Attachment and Neurobiology / How Children and Young People are Silenced / A Brief Overview of Theoretical Basis for Abuse-Focused Therapy Approaches & Stages 12.30-1.30pm Lunch

1.30-3pm Disclosure Experiences/ Help Seeking / What survivors look for in a therapist / Beginning therapy 3- 3.30pm Afternoon tea 3.30 -5pm Clients’ Experiences of Therapy / What helped in therapy/ What was unhelpful Dr Kim McGregor, QSO, has worked as a therapist with survivors of sexual abuse for 30 years. She is the author of: Warriors of Truth a self-help book for adult survivors of child sexual abuse (1994); the up-dated version Surviving and Moving On (2008); the first set of ACC national therapy guidelines Therapy Guidelines: Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse (2001). She has published several papers including in the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, and Journal of Trauma and Dissociation. She is the co-author of the book Powergames (published in NZ & UK 2001). Her doctoral thesis Therapy It’s a Two-Way Thing (2003) explored what a sample of women survivors of child sexual abuse found helpful and unhelpful in therapy. Her post-doctoral thesis explored the health impacts of child sexual abuse and the types of responses survivors wanted from health care professionals. Kim currently runs her own research



and therapy company Tiaki Consultants alongside her partner Russell Smith. She also has a part time role as the Chief Victims Advisor to Government. From 2005-2015 Kim was the Executive Director of Rape Prevention Education Whakatu Mauri, 2005-2013 was a founding and executive member of the Te Ohaakii a Hine - National Network Ending Sexual Violence Together, and the Tauiwi Caucus Chair, 2007-2009 was a member of the New Zealand government’s Taskforce for Action on Sexual Violence and was a founding and executive member of Project Restore 2004-2013. Kim has worked alongside Louise Nicholas since 2006 and wrote the Forward for her book Louise Nicholas My Story.

Online registration available here: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpssevents/#cid=884&wid=301

Venues

Auckland: Jubilee Hall, Parnell Trust, 545 Parnell Road, Parnell Wellington: Level 1, Mercure Abel Tasman Hotel, 169 Willis Street Christchurch: Conference room, YMCA Christchurch, 12 Hereford Street

REGISTRATION & TAX INVOICE

PAYMENT

All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864

Name ...................................................................................... City.......................................................................................... E-Mail .................................................................................... Phone .....................................................................................

Auckland - 7 April Wellington - 11 April Christchurch - 18 April Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. If your employer is paying for your registration please ensure your payment is referenced with your surname. Cancellation: Up to 14 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 14 working days before event – no refund but named substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified. The NZPsS reserves the right to cancel the workshop, with not less than 10 days notice, should there be insufficient registrations.

I accept the booking conditions Signed ..................................................................................... Date ........................................................................................ Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

scan and email completed form to: [email protected] or fax to: 04 4734889 or post to PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146

NZPsS Member

$190.00

Non Member

$220.00

NZPsS Student

$50.00

Non NZPsS Student

$80.00

Cost (incl. GST) covers: • •

m/tea, lunch, a/tea workshop materials

I have special dietary requirements (please specify).......................................................... Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: New Zealand Psychological Society BNZ, 02-0560-0262471-000 Payment reference ................................... Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

---- ---- ---- ----

Cardholder Name .................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../.......................

Worried Sick? Extending the application of cognitive behavioural approaches, from health anxiety to medically unexplained symptoms and long term medical conditions. Prof Paul Salkovskis, UK 1st July 2016 in Christchurch, 9.00am - 4.30pm Quality Hotel Elms, 456 Papanui Road 4th July 2016 in Auckland, 9.00am- 4.30pm Sorrento in the Park, 670 Manukau Rd, Royal Oak Background: Cognitive behavioural approaches to health anxiety have been shown to be effective in RCTs in people where the main presenting problem is anxiety focussed on health, and in those seeking medical help in hospital found to have high levels of health anxiety. There are also indications that CBT could be effective in Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS) and in Long Term Physical Health problems (LTC) associated with relatively severe psychological distress. Purpose of workshop: In this workshop, the theoretical and clinical underpinnings of CBT for health anxiety on its own and linked to MUS and LTC will be described, starting with the success of CBT and identifying its limitations in this context. The importance of using a transdiagnostic approach as a way of ensuring high quality therapy is considered in the context of the need to address the specific issues in diverse problems such as chronic pain, irritable bowel, chronic fatigue and so on. The result is a new hybrid transdiagnostic/specific approach, with core elements including engagement and developing a shared understanding supplemented by “modules” addressing specific aspects of MUS in the later stages of treatment, with behavioural experiments cutting across both aspects of the treatment. Treatment fundamentals and details will be discussed and, where possible, demonstrated. Time will be allowed for

discussion of cases brought by participants who are prepared to role-play their clients. Suitable for: All clinicians interested in working with these problems, including but not confined to clinical psychologists, general practitioners, psychiatrists, nurse therapists and so on. Professor Paul Salkovskis, B.Sc., M.Phil. (Clin. Psychol), PhD, C.Psychol., FBPsS Paul Salkovskis is currently Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, London and Clinical Director at the Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust. He is editor of “Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy”, the official scientific journal of the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. He completed his training at the Institute of Psychiatry in the late 70s, after which he worked as a full time clinician in the health service, also conducting research as part of this work. He

subsequently transferred to a clinical research position in 1985 at the University of Oxford; at the time he left in 2000, his title was Professor of Cognitive Psychology. His transfer to an academic position did not interfere with his commitment ot clinical work, which continues at a high level to the present day. His main contributions have been in the areas of cognitive models and treatments of anxiety disorders and in health psychology. His theoretical paper (in 1985) on a cognitive theory of Obsessive compulsive disorder was a synthesis of the work of Beck and Rachman, and highlighted the role of the way in which intrusions were interpreted as a sign of “responsibility” for harm or its prevention. Such interpretations were described as motivating compulsive behaviour, paving the way for new cognitive strategies for the treatment of OCD. He worked closely with David M Clark on the development and validation of the cognitive model of Panic Disorder, and with Hilary Warwick on severe and persistent Health Anxiety (“Hypochondriasis”). With all of these disorders he has developed and refined innovative cognitive-behavioural treatment strategies. Paul also developed the concept of “safety seeking behaviour”, highlighting its role in the maintenance and treatment of anxiety disorders. This influential work has resulted in new ways of thinking about the use of behavioural strategies in cognitive therapy, resulting in a proper integration rather than a hybridized approach. In health psychology he has researched aspects of health screening and developed the concept of “evidence based patient choice”. More recently he and his team have been considering issues including dissemination of treatment and the application of the cognitive model of health anxiety to chronic pain.

TIMES: 9.00am -4.30pm (10.30am m/tea, 12.30pm lunch, 3.00pm a/tea) ONLINE REGISTRATION AVAILABLE HERE: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/ nzpss-events/#cid=884&wid=301 REGISTRATION Name ........................................................................................................ City ........................................................................................................... E-Mail ....................................................................................................... Phone ....................................................................................................... Christchurch, 1 July Auckland, 4 July I have special dietary requirements: ....................................

PAYMENT/ TAX INVOICE All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864 includes m/and a/tea and lunch ICP member

$100.00

NZPsS member

$190.00

Non member

$230.00

ICP Students

$20.00

NZPsS Students

$40.00

..................................................................................................................... Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. Cancellation: Up to 5 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 5 working days before event – no refund but substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified.

I accept the booking conditions Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: NZ Psychological Society 02-0560-0262471-003 Payment reference: Salk & your name Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

---- ---- ---- ----

Cardholder Name ....................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../....................... EMAIL completed form to: [email protected] or post to: NZPsS, PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146 or fax to: 04 4734889

2016 Samma Sati Meditation Retreat Introduction

Following our hugely successful 2015 Check-in for Mindful Souls we will hold our retreat again in 2016. This is not a formal training course, but a gathering of like-minded people who want to share their experience, expertise and energy. Samma Sati or Right Mindfulness is the seventh step in the Eightfold Noble Path. To be mindful is to be fully present and alert, not lost in daydreams, anticipation, indulgences, or worry. " Right Mindfulness is at the heart of the Buddha's teaching."

- Thích Nhất Hạnh

The 2016 Check-in starts on a Friday evening and continues over Saturday and Sunday. It takes place in the beautifully restful St Francis Retreat Centre, 50 Hillsborough Rd, Mt Roskill, Auckland. The Centre allows us to each have a single room for the retreat. It is an opportunity to enter a focused and peaceful learning environment, away from the external pressures of our busy lives.

Who is this programme for?

The retreat is designed to be relevant to a wide range of people: coaches, HR/OD people and culture practitioners, executive and life coaches, psychologists and other helping professionals.

You will gain: 
  The opportunity to begin or deepen your mindfulness practice
  An occasion to understand the growth of mindfulness in the workplace  The chance to explore the application of mindfulness in your life and work
  A deeper personal understanding of what makes mindfulness and meditation effective.

Retreat leaders

Jane Davis has worked in the Organisational Psychology field for the last 25 years. She is a consultant with Capability Group Limited and specialises in positive psychology-based change programmes. Mindfulness is a core component of the programmes offered and Jane has worked with many organisations to introduce mindfulness-based practices to leaders in a highly practical and relevant way. Stewart Forsyth has particular expertise in improving individual and organisational performance. He is a highly experienced executive coach, OD systems developer and mindfulness practitioner. He has deep interests in both mindfulness outcome research as well as in the fitness-mindfulness interface.

Iain McCormick is an executive coach with over 40 years of mindfulness practice who trained as a clinical psychologist and has a PhD in the area of work stress. He has taught mindfulness in a wide range of contexts including in Acceptance and Commitment Training programmes. Iain has a deep interest in applying mindfulness in coaching.

Course overview

Following the comments on our 2015 retreat we will spend more time in the practice of meditation but will still explore new exciting ideas in mindfulness.

Friday evening – 15 April 2016  Welcome, the structure of the retreat, a shared meal, shared experiences, shared mindfulness Day One – Saturday 16 April 2016

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  

Mindful practice Character strengths and mindfulness Compassion and mindfulness

Day Two – Sunday 17 April 2016  Mindful practice  Mindfulness and pain  Mindfulness and daily hassles.

Course details

Hosts: The Industrial Organisational Special Interest Group (IO SIG) but anyone is welcome to attend the programme.

Dates: Friday 15 April 2016– from 6 pm, until Sunday 17th April 2016 at 4.00 pm Venue: St Francis Retreat Centre, 50 Hillsborough Rd, Mt Roskill, Auckland http://www.stfrancisretreatcentre.org.nz

Cost: Early-bird (payment before 28th Feb): $288.89 + GST ($325); Full price (after 28th Feb): $400 + GST ($450); Registered Psychologists (after 28th Feb): $320 + GST ($360)

Please register with Stewart Forsyth, [email protected] Stewart will arrange for an invoice to be sent to you. Refund policy: 100% refunds up to 1 March, 80% refund up to and including 1 April. No refund after this date. If the event is not run you will receive a refund. Last year the programme was oversubscribed and those who enrolled late were not able to attend. So please be in early!

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