2016 June

New Zealand Psychological Society Te Rōpū Mātai Hinengaro o Aotearoa CONNECTIONS In this issue NZPsS News - CLICK to ac...

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New Zealand Psychological Society Te Rōpū Mātai Hinengaro o Aotearoa

CONNECTIONS In this issue NZPsS News - CLICK to access • • • • • •

A big thank you-subs Update on Professional Practice book Farewell to John Groom Notice of AGM NZPsS signs MOU with the British Psychological Society Letter to the Minister of Health

Professional Issues • • • • •

Ethics Matters New Zealand Psychology’s Public Face A response to ‘A matter of concern’ RSNZ survey update NZPB- Neuropsychology scope

Student Space •

From your Student Rep

NZPsS 2016 Conference Professional Development Membership Notices News Bytes & Resources Request for Assistance Other PD opportunities Events Calendar Advertising Workshop flyers

June/Pipiri 2016

NZPsS NEWS of The Coaching Psychologist) he quotes Eric Berne – “we are on earth to explore the three big questions: Who am I? What am I doing here? Who the heck are these other people?” Your subs are now due -thank you to those of you who have paid In his productive professional career John was a teacher, health and already. We very much appreciate early payment- it helps us a community psychologist, manager of clinical services and director lot!! Please contact Kylie with any queries, of a training centre. His qualifications included a Master of Arts from [email protected] the University of Auckland and a post-graduate Diploma in Business – Pay your subs by 1 July, and you go into the draw specialising in organisational development from Massey University. to win a PD voucher worth $100. There are ten John’s enthusiasm for contributing to personal growth and vouchers available. Voucher winners will be development was illustrated by his considerable work as a coach, announced in the July- Connections. also as a professional supervisor, and his services to the profession of coaching in New Zealand. He was a key player in initiating the New Update on the revision of the Professional Practice of Zealand Coaching Psychology Special Interest Group and contributed Psychology book to and participated in mindfulness and meditation retreats. The 3rd edition of Professional Practice of Psychology in Aotearoa John was also passionate about music and hi-fi, including reviewing New Zealand edited by Waikaremoana Waitoki, Jacqueline Feather, hi-fi equipment. He was always willing to offer support to those Julia Rucklidge and Neville Robertson will be launched at the NZPsS exploring the latest hi-fi technologies. Conference in Wellington, Massey University- Friday 2nd September John will be missed for his commitment to his profession, his support at 1pm. Over 70 authors have contributed to the book which covers of his colleagues, and his impish humour which often provided a a broad range of psychology-related topics. needed perspective on issues. He is survived by his wife Jade, son Chris and grandchildren.

A big thank you for your subs payment- due 1 July

Farewell to John Groom

Longstanding member of the NZPsS John Groom recently passed away after a brief illness. Our thanks to Stewart Forsyth, who at very short notice, wrote the piece below honouring and remembering John. It was with great sadness that I learned of John’s death after a brief illness, from pancreatic cancer. John has been a stalwart of the profession of coaching psychology in New Zealand, and been an executive coach since 1994. His enthusiasm for adult learning and development was transparent. In a 2005 paper (in the first edition

Notice of AGM of the New Zealand Psychological Society Members are advised that the NZPsS AGM will take place at the venue of the NZPsS Conference at Massey University, Wellington Date and Time: 3 September 2016 5pm Where: Executive Suite (ESS), Massey University, Wellington The business to be transacted will include • Receiving annual reports from Society officers and sub-groups Page 1

• •

Remits General business

Election of Officers Nominations are called for the following positions on the NZPsS Executive • President Elect • Director of Scientific Issues • Director of Professional Development and Training • Director of Social Issues • Director of Professional Issues Nominations must be in writing with the endorsement of the nominee and must reach the NZPsS National Office by 5pm, Monday 1 August, 2016 Click here for the nomination form and click here for the role descriptions • If only one nomination is received for a particular role as at 1 August, the Chair will declare that person elected at the AGM • If no nominations are received by 1 August 2016 for a particular role, nominations will continue to be accepted up until and at the AGM. If more than one nomination is received, a postal ballot will be held as provided for in Appendix 1 of the Society’s Rules Submitting Remits to the Annual General Meeting Content of Remits The Executive recommends that Remits fall into one of two categories: 1. Opinion Remits Opinion remits are those on which members seek to have their opinions or attitudes recorded on an issue. Members are free to express opinions on issues. The conventional way of handling such issues is to quantify opinions in terms of positive, negative and neutral attitudes. It is recommended that this procedure be used for the recording of votes on opinion remits, so that

generalisation to all Society members cannot be inferred. 2. Action Remits Action remits are those which seek to bind the Society to a given course of action. In both organisational and legal terms, the Objects define and limit what the Society can do. An action remit should show in what way it proposes action on the part of the Society within the Society’s Objects (Rule 2). Unless the Chair of a general meeting is satisfied that an action remit falls within the Society’s Objects it should not proceed as an action remit but could be dealt with as an opinion remit. Format of Remits Remits should be a brief expression of opinion or of suggested action and should not include arguments in support. Movers have the opportunity to express arguments at the meeting. It is expected that the proposer(s) of the remit will indicate the nature of supporting evidence, i.e. whether it is of experimental, survey, professional or personal origin. Remits should be submitted in writing, accompanied by the names of the proposer(s) and seconder and indication of sub-group or other support, to the NZPsS Executive Director at least one month before the Annual General Meeting. Final due date for remits is 30 July, 2016. Please email remits to Pamela Hyde at execut[email protected] psychology.org.nz Meeting Procedure Rule 29.1 requires the Society to give all members 35 calendar days’ notice of an Annual General Meeting. As noted above action remits should be in the hands of the NZPsS Executive Director within the deadline for inclusion in the AGM agenda so that members are aware of the remits put forward and what the Society may be committed to if action remits are approved. The mover of each action remit should indicate which Objects of the Society, the remit relates to. The usual procedure for submitting remits for

consideration at the AGM is EITHER to have the remits passed at a formal sub-group meeting OR to obtain support for the remit from any five or more members. Remits supported in either of these ways may be given priority over remits from individual members. In accordance with Rule 27.2 remits tabled at the AGM will only be considered at the Chairperson’s discretion.

NZPsS signs MOU with the British Psychological Society Carebots, Collaboration and Common Goals

From Left to Right: Jamie Hacker Hughes (President, BPS) – shaking hands; Peter Kinderman (President Elect, BPS)Dorothy Miell (Vice President., BPS) Quentin Abraham (President Elect, NZPsS)

I attended The British Psychological Society (BPS) conference in Nottingham, England, 25-28 April 2016, as President Elect on behalf of The New Zealand Psychological Society (NZPsS). The primary task was to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the BPS and NZPsS. We have seen the benefits of our participation on the world stage by helping to design a set of global competencies for psychology as part of the International Project on Competence in Psychology (IPCP). This MOU extends our commitment to participating in the development Page 2

of psychology at this global level and our willingness to collaborate on common goals During the conference, a roundtable was hosted with representatives from the BPS executive, presidents from Sweden, the USA and Ireland. There were discussions about how to make each memorandum of understanding with the British Psychological Society practically relevant such as reductions in fees to our respective conferences and journals. Equally exciting was the prospect of collaborating on areas of common policy and interest. I spoke to five areas of shared concern: 1. Rigor – maintaining the quality of psychology offered to the public. Preventing watered down, levels of service and research. The pressures of the Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF), the ethics of falsification and massaging data in the social sciences. This is increasingly important with the debate about who delivers or disseminates psychological knowledge and expertise with stepped care and Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT). 2. Relevance - there is a considerable public appetite for psychology so how do we work with the media and keep the public informed so our work makes a difference. There is room for joint training and media releases so that we can have an impact across the globe. 3. Representation - who produces, asks the research questions and delivers our services? The BPS has been considering the lack of diversity within the profession of psychology. Likewise the NZPsS is keen to make structural changes and to support initiatives that might improve the representation of identified groups. 4. Reality – how do we keep our psychology real, addressing the everyday concerns of our communities, promoting research and practice which address the social issues and the messiness of lived experience? For example, refugees/migrants, DSM 5, child protection and special educational needs. What influence and forms of psychology can we bring to

bear to question the status quo? 5. Re-Emerging - what can we do to be proactive, planning for the type of psychology we would like to see in 10 years, 50 years or 100 years’ time? How do we maintain the diversity of different types of psychology and also allow for new developments, for example, in coaching or neuropsychology. David Clarke, one of the architects of Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) gave a keynote address. The IAPT programme has systematically evaluated the outcomes of therapeutic practice on an unprecedented scale. Many questions might be raised about the suitability of this model for Aotearoa/New Zealand. These include the risks of false positives and the over diagnosis of some conditions such as social anxiety; treating the symptoms and not the causes of mental health difficulties; and whether such a programme facilitates communities becoming more resilient. Gail Kinman also gave a thought provoking keynote about the effectiveness of self-compassion programmes to reduce burnout and increase retention rates for social workers and nurses. The UK teachers and junior doctors strikes, beg the question if more compassion generally in public services would be desirable? She finished her presentation with a provocative photograph of a CareBot. In the brave new world, this is a robot designed to offer care and compassion to our elderly. Demographic trends do suggest that in the future individual support is going to be increasingly difficult to deliver. How can psychologists help to resource our communities to develop and maintain their wellbeing? Quentin Abraham President Elect of the New Zealand Psychological Society

NZPsS letter to the Minister of Health The NZPsS has written a letter to the Minister of Health Hon. Jonathan Coleman asking that the voluntary bonding scheme for hard-to-staff areas be widened to include psychologists. Click to read the letter http://www. psychology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/Extension-ofvoluntary-bonding-schemes-to-psychologists.pdf

“PsychDirect” and “Find-a-Supervisor” The Find a Psychologist database “PsychDirect” is now free to join. Please go to the website for information about terms and conditions and the application form: http://www.psychology.org.nz/ membership/benefits/psychdirect

The Find-a-Supervisor database is on the members’ only area of our website. You find information and the application form here:

http://www.psychology.org.nz/members-only/find-asupervisor

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Professional Issues Ethics Matters Dr Elizabeth du Preez is a registered clinical and counselling psychologist and a lecturer on the Postgraduate Programme in Counselling Psychology at AUT. She has a special interest in professional ethics and clinical supervision and maintains a small private practice in Auckland. [email protected] Continuing Competence Programme: The Role of the Supervisor I am looking forward to your correspondence on this matter – any ideas and comments are welcome at As we are in the beginning of the continuing competence period for 2016/2017 I thought it would be good to highlight how the new simplified version of the continuing competence programme (CCP) might impact on the role of supervisors. This topic has also been addressed in the NZ Psychologists Board Newsletter (December 2015). I will summarise some of the main points for readers, and highlight some important considerations for clinical supervisors. Supervisors have always had a central role in the CCP, providing an opportunity for the practitioner to reflect on their practice, to discuss relevant and appropriate professional development activities and to reflect on these at the end of the continuing competence year cycle. It is envisioned that supervisors will provide independent and objective feedback on the practitioner’s professional progress as well as the challenges and learning edges that they encountered. More generally, the purpose of supervision is to offer a safe space for reflecting on clinical practice issues. One of the changes in the revised CCP is that

supervisors are asked to confirm, through a signed declaration, that they have been involved in the two key steps (the self-reflective review and the end of year review) of the CCP, instead of just a general declaration that they were involved in the CCP process. It is import to note that from the Board’s perspective (December 2015 Newsletter) supervisors “are not held responsible for the actions of the supervisee psychologist, for example, guaranteeing the veracity of the log book, nor for ensuring that appropriate learning activity is undertaken.” From this statement, it doesn’t seem as if supervisors are expected to “manage” their supervisee’s competence programme, but are expected to offer objective feedback at the end of the year, commenting on progress or lack thereof, and to be involved in setting learning objectives that are based on the self-reflective review for the next CCP cycle. If we look at the Board’s Best Practice Guidelines for supervision there are two important points that are relevant to our discussion on the role of the supervisor in the continuing competence programme. The Board aligns itself with the following definition of supervision “professional support provided… by a professional peer for the purposes of professional development” rather than “the monitoring of, and reporting on, the performance of a health practitioner by a professional peer” (p. 2). The Board further suggests that a supervisor can “include various approaches to sampling the supervisee’s work, including face-to-face discussion of case work, direct observation of the supervisee’s work through audio or video recording, and file or report review”. http://www.psychologistsboard.org.nz/cms_ show_download.php?id=220 I believe there is possibly an inherent tension between the definition of supervision that is preferred in the best practice guidelines (support rather than monitoring) and the current required actions of the supervisor. This being, to declare their involvement and offer objective feedback on progress and challenges, through drawing on multiple aspects of a supervisee’s work. I think supervision sits on a continuum of support/reflection on the one end, and monitoring/review on the other end. My perspective

is that the new CCP process requires a movement from supervisors towards monitoring and review, even though the Board is clear that we are not responsible for the actions of the supervisee in relation to their CCP. The question is how do we address this tension between support and management, level of involvement and level of responsibility? I would appreciate any thoughts or feedback on the role of the supervisor in the revised professional competence process and look forward to continuing this conversation in next month’s column. I will also provide a follow-up discussion on issues related to Family Court Specialist Report Writers, as discussed in the May column.

New Zealand Psychology’s Public Face: Part-1 by Benita Stiles-Smith and Kayla Marshall As noted in the previous issue of Connections, the NZPsS and the NZCCP have together created the Future Psychology Initiative with the purpose of positioning psychology to advantage for best serving in a continuously evolving NZ environment. Areas of action for a resilient, robust, and relevant profession have been identified over the past two years, resulting in five working groups (see http://www.psychology.org. nz/membership/thefuture-psychology-initiative ). One of these work groups, Enhancing Professional Practice and Identity, posed the fascinating question of “What is available in the public media to influence what New Zealanders think of psychologists?” Examination of webbased material available to the New Zealand public by two of the work group members brought the following information. People in Aotearoa/New Zealand are interested in psychological and mental health, as evidenced by the popularity of Mike King’s award winning Nutters Club, a mental health interview and talk back radio show, with an active Facebook community of more than 500,000 (Nutters Club, 2016). The NZ Herald publishes a weekly column regarding mental health issues (MacDonald, Page 4

2016). However, despite interest, psychologists in the public eye remain few and representation of psychologist thought, expertise, and research is sparse. When one googles “New Zealand psychologists”, top results include several sites constructed primarily for New Zealand psychologists, including the NZ Psychologist Board, the NZ Psychological Society, and the NZ College of Clinical Psychologists, each of which includes internal tabs for public information. Other psychologist-oriented sites include those for recruitment, professionals’ immigration, and career information. From these sites, an inquiring member of the public might note that psychologists are in short supply in NZ. Descriptions of what psychologists do, seem generally oriented toward those with an interest in becoming a psychologist. Advertising of psychologist services is found through a variety of avenues, including special interest groups, private practitioners, agencies and organisations. News media coverage of crises, crimes, and other particular events frequently utilise psychologists’ comments. Psychologists seem to be considered by the media to be credible sources with valuable perspectives to offer (e.g. Breakfast, 2011; Cleaver, 2013; New Zealand News 3, 2014; Quilliam, 2014; Wilson, 2015). The NZ Listener, a widely distributed weekly publication, makes use of a psychologist in a regular column presenting some aspect of psychological research or reflection (Wilson, 2016). New Zealand productions have featured psychologist Nigel Latta on a variety of topics (Latta, 2014). A few psychologist produced blogs are periodically available, as can currently be seen for the Worry Bug project for Christchurch children (2016). Psychologists have also come under public scrutiny in the media at times. For instance, concerns have been expressed regarding psychologists’ perspectives that might conflict with those of the justice system, or failures to accurately predict reoffending by a person convicted of previous crimes (e.g. Bradwell, 2014). And as might be expected, unethical behaviour by psychologists is reported in the news media when it occurs, sometimes

with comment regarding expected behavioural standards (e.g. Johnston, 2015; New Zealand Herald, 2015). Psychologist news releases from institutions and professional organisations are often published via Comvoices, an on-line weekly newsletter for a network of member organisations in NZ dedicated to collaborative work on common concerns (Comvoices, n.d.), and Scoop, an on-line independent news feed (Scoop, n.d) . While these publications are avenues for gaining some public audience, readers of these sources are somewhat selfselected groups who are likely to be particularly inquiring, rather than a more broad and general public as might notice and read news headline banners. Part-2 to follow in next issue. References Bradwell, S. (2014). Phillip Smith’s escape plan hatched a decade ago. The Dominion Post. Retrieved 30/3/2016 from http://www.stuff. co.nz/national/crime/63150620/phillip-smiths- escape-plan-hatcheda-decade-ago Breakfast. (2011). Psychologist advises monitoring earthquake stress. TVNZ One News. Retrieved 30 November, 2015 from http://tvnz. co.nz/breakfast-news/psychologist-advises-monitoring-quake-stressvideo-3763357 Cleaver, D. (2013). Mental health issues – cricket just the starting point. NZ Herald. Retrieved 29 November, 2015 from http://www.nzherald. co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11148358 Comvoices. (n.d.). Comvoices: Advancing the Community Sector. Retrieved 29 November, 2015 from http://comvoices.org.nz/ Johnston, M. (2025). Psychologist suspended for social links. New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 30 November, 2015 from http://www. nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11486469 Latta, N. (2014). Goldfish wisdom: The website of Nigel Latta. Retrieved 29 November from http://www.goldfishwisdom.org/ MacDonald, K. (2016). Kyle MacDonald’s Opinion. New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 31 March, 2016 from http://www.nzherald.co.nz/life-stylecomment/news/article.cfm?c_ id=1503216&objectid=11599315 New Zealand Herald. (2015). Psychologist breached boundaries with sexual relationship. Retrieved 30 November, 2015 from http://www. nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11520240 New Zealand News 3. (2014). Psychologist shocked by Kiwi’s Dubai robberies. Retrieved 30 November, 2015 from http://www.3news. co.nz/world/psychologist-shocked-by-kiwis-dubai-robbery2014102307#axzz3t9EnsL2f

Nutters Club (2016). On Newstalk ZB, Archives. Retrieved 31 March, 2016 from http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/nutters-club/ Quilliam, R. (2014). “Skinny people” comments harmful – psychologist. NZ Herald. Retrieved 29 November, 2015 from http://www.nzherald. co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11342732 Scoop, Independent News (n.d.). Retrieved 29 November, 2015 from http://www.scoop.co.nz/about/about.html?Source=Ftr Wilson, K.B. (2015). Police respond to schoolgirl fight video. Radio New Zealand News. Retrieved 29 November, 2015 from http://www.radionz. co.nz/news/national/267605/police-respond-to-schoolgirl-fight-video Wilson, M. (2016). Psychology. New Zealand Listener. Retrieved 31 March, 2016 from http://www.listener.co.nz/lifestyle/psychology/ page/15/ Worry Bug (2016). Retrieved 31 March, 2016 from http://www. theworrybug.co.nz/blog

A response to ‘A matter of concern’ In the May Connections Dr Peter Stanley shared his concern that the Final Report of the Exert Panel on Child, Youth and Family prioritises child clinical psychologists for future therapeutic work with vulnerable children in state care. Peter’s point is that psychologists should be selected on the basis of their expertise and experience rather than in relation to scope and title. Peter has raised this concern with the Investing in Children Programme, and Programme Director Jack Carroll has written a formal reply. Excerpts from Jack’s letter are presented below: “The investment approach will essentially provide the new children’s entity with the levers required to prioritise investment early, including direct purchasing of services on behalf of children and families and to ensure access to the right services at the right time. I think you would agree that it would be unrealistic to believe that one agency would have the resources needed to address the complexities of our most vulnerable children and young people. Therefore, if the services of a specific resource are required, then staff will have the ability to buy-in that resource for as long as it is needed.” “The Investing in Children’s programme (formally the Expert Panel’s Secretariat) are in the early stages of the detailed Page 5

design of the new operating model and as such, no detailed decisions have been made about the individual roles and functions of the new children’s entity. However, I will pass on your observations to the team working on the design of the new organisational form, and ask that they consider them in their planning.”

Thank you from the Royal Society of New Zealand Thank you for assisting us to gather responses for our survey of the research community earlier this year. Overall we are able to gather 1003 completed responses across universities, CRIs, private research organisations, ITPs, Polytechnics and Wananga. We were especially pleased to gather responses from respondents who were not members (62%), and some who had not heard of us before. We are circulating directly those who responded, but also felt the survey results would have direct interest for research organisations. A four page summary is available at http://www. royalsociety.org.nz/media/2016/05/Research-communitysurvey-summary-of-findings.pdf and if you want access to further detail you can obtain it via a link on this page: http://www.royalsociety.org.nz/2016/05/24/results-ofresearch-community-survey/. Information gathered will be used by us to improve the membership services we provide to the research community and to develop a communications and outreach plan so that in future more people know what we do and how to engage with us. Thanks again for your time and support Yours sincerely Andrew Dr Andrew Cleland Chief Executive

From the New Zealand Psychologists Board: scope of practice for neuropsychology In December 2015 the Psychologists Board consulted key stakeholders on the question of whether or not a scope of practice for neuropsychology should be established. The

Board has subsequently decided to establish the scope. The Board is now seeking comment on how the scope should be described, what its title should be, what qualifications should be required for registration in the scope, what core competencies are required, and how “grand-parenting” into the scope should be managed. A consultation document has been published on our website. If you would like to comment, please complete the Board’s online survey by July 29 2016. You can also access the survey via a link on the “What’s new?” page of the Board’s website. (www. psychologistsboard.org.nz) Feedback can also be sent to: by email to: [email protected] Subject line: Scope consultation or mail: Scope consultation c/- New Zealand Psychologists Board PO Box 9644 Wellington 6141

Student Space

From your student repMichele Blick Annual Conference Psychology Without Borders: Mā te mahi kakama, kō atu The NZPsS Annual Conference is just over two months away. Make the most of being a student with the generous student rate of $100 for the three day conference. This year the conference is at Massey University, Wellington from Thursday 1st to Sunday 4th September. There are a range of accommodation options on the NZPsS website (http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/ annual-conference/?#.V1Ofyvl97IU). Options include hotels, apartments and backpackers. The website has information about each option with rates, address and contact details. The conference is an opportunity to listen to psychologists from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives. Formats include workshops, symposia, oral presentations and poster presentations. The conference is also an excellent opportunity to network. There will be a student breakfast sponsored by the Institute of Clinical Psychology (ICP) and hosted by the ICP student rep, Kate Ross-McAlpine. There are additional opportunities to meet fellow students and professionals during morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea (food is included in the conference price). It’s actually a very social event! There will also be a student get together at a local pub. More info to come. Correction Please note that the surname and email address of Jessica Scanlan, student rep for the ICJFP, was incorrect Page 6

in the last Connections. Jessica’s email address is jessica. [email protected] New Student Representatives A warm welcome to the new student reps for the Auckland Branch - Jules Lough and Debra Kenwright. Thank you, Jules and Debra, for taking on this role. Hi there, My name is Jules, I am one of the new student reps for the Auckland Branch. I am a mum of 2 boys (ages 9 and 11) and I’m currently enrolled at AUT in the Counselling Psych Programme. I trained as a Naturopath in 2001, after many years working in the pharmaceutical industry, partly for my own journey, but to gain a more integrated perspective on health and healing. I’m a sport nut by nature so it seemed to fit well. As a naturopath I completed the DAN (defeat autism now) training through MINDD, a network of health professionals who integrate modern medicine with biomedical approaches to treat special needs and mental health. This is where I realised I wanted, and more importantly, needed to learn more about psychology in order to integrate nutrition, mental health and wellbeing, for myself but in practice. A few years, 2 boys and some bumps in the road later, I completed a Grad dip in Psych at Auckland, which led me to pursue psychology and enrol at AUT. I’m interested in getting to know the community within psychology a little better as the student rep. I look forward to being the Auckland Branch student rep, and meeting you at one of the many events. Warm regards, Jules Kia ora, My name is Debra Kenwright and I have taken up the role as student representative for the Auckland Branch for 2016. As an adult student of Massey University, I am completing my Masters in Educational Psychology, with aspirations of complete my Internship next year and go on to become an Educational Psychologist, ideally with the Ministry of

Education. I am passionate about being a change agent for young people. I am also studying towards the Level 2 certificate in Te Ara Reo Māori at the Te Wānanga ō Aotearoa. I do not feel like I have any ‘spare time’ these days, but when the opportunity arises, I do enjoy fishing, Pilates, walking on our local beach and spending time with friends and family. In my role as student representative for the Auckland Branch, I hope to gain further insight into the functions of the NZPsS, participate in the organisation of events, and offer any ideas I might have. I also hope to become involved in student interests, learning more about these as I meet more of you, and advocate for student members whereever possible. Ngā mihi Debra Student Contributions Corinne Lucas-D’Souza shares some tips for those writing a thesis. She also writes about the benefits of being part of a professional organisation and her experience as a member of the Coaching Psychology Special Interest Group (CPSIG). Master’s Research Tips In March 2016 Corinne gained a Master of Science in Applied Psychology with First Class Honours from the University of Canterbury. Her research topic was “Unemployment as a screening device? The effect of unemployment status on selection decisions among New Zealand recruiters”. “I thoroughly enjoyed my dissertation year. My supervisors, Katharina Näswall and Kumar Yogeeswaran, were amazing. We made a great team and I especially enjoyed our brainstorming sessions at the beginning of the year.” Finding a topic was easy for Corinne as she had a strong interest in intergroup relations and social justice: “I chose a topic that I was passionate about so it did not feel like work at all!” Being really organised was key: “I was

determined to have my final draft ready by Xmas Eve so that I could spend three weeks off study with my family. It allowed me to look at my draft again with a fresh pair of eyes around mid-January and still have two weeks left for my final edits. I actually submitted three days early!” Corinne’s top tips for a successful research project: 1. Choose a supervisor wisely. It will be someone you feel you can work with, be open with, and accept guidance from. And don’t forget you get to choose a co-supervisor too! 2. Choose a topic you are passionate about. If you don’t feel passionate about any particular topic, choose something that you feel happy to research in depth for a whole year. 3. Be organised. Follow your supervisor’s guidance in terms of milestones you should be reaching by certain dates. It is meant to make things easier for you! For more information on the Master of Science in Applied Psychology please visit http://www.psyc. canterbury.ac.nz/apsy/ Networking Tips Joining a professional group as a volunteer can provide valuable experiences and opportunities to meet professionals working in the field of psychology. It is great for developing skills and building your CV, and an excellent way to develop a professional network. In February 2015 Corinne joined the Coaching Psychology Special Interest Group (CPSIG), part of the NZPsS. In her role as Secretary/Research she has been writing synopses of journal articles to share on CPnet (CPSIG’s Google discussion group), as well as preparing newsletters, agendas, taking minutes, and general organising (organising events, finding venues etc). “I feel a lot of satisfaction from knowing that my synopses will be useful to professionals who lack time to search for and read journal articles. I learn so much in the process too!” Page 7

Being part of the committee has been inspirational: “It has allowed me to work with wonderful volunteers who are passionate about coaching psychology.” Being part of the group also allows for networking opportunities: “I have had the opportunity to meet really interesting professionals in the field of psychology, coaching psychology and HR.” “Corinne is a fantastic member of our team on the CPSIG steering group. Her organising skills are highly valued and her passionate interest in writing the research synopses means all the members of CPSIG and CPnet gain from Corinne’s contributions”. (Trish Tapara, Chair CPSIG Steering Group). CPSIG are always looking for students who have an interest in coaching and would like to put their research and/or organisational skills to good use. If you would like to be involved (e.g. write synopses, articles or help organise professional events etc) on a casual or regular basis please get in touch with Corinne, [email protected] For more information on coaching psychology, please visit http://www.psychology. org.nz/membership/member-groups/special- interestgroups/#.Vv2Udo9OLIU Thank you for sharing your experiences, Corinne. It would be fantastic to have more student contributions. Please feel free to contribute anything that would be of interest to students. Here are some ideas: a) internship experiences e.g. internship placement, a description of the work that you are doing, your experience of being an intern … b) thesis topic and outline including the experience of doing a thesis c) a description of your programme d) student-related issues / information e) psychology-related issues / information

Find out what is going on in your region - Feel free to make contact with your branch and institute student rep: Branch Student Reps Otago Branch Sabrina Goh – [email protected] Tia Neha – [email protected] Canterbury Branch Julia Bergman - [email protected] Nelson Branch Trish Kennedy – [email protected] Wellington Branch Charlotte Wainwright – [email protected] Maddy Brocklesby – [email protected] Nick Arnott-Steel – [email protected] Thea Wass – [email protected] Bay of Plenty Emma-Leigh Hodge – [email protected] Waikato Branch Jane Currie – [email protected] Auckland Branch Jules Lough - [email protected] Debbie Kenwright – [email protected]

Institute of Counselling Psychology – contact Serena Walker ([email protected]) Institute of Health Psychology – contact Iris Fontanilla ([email protected]) Please don’t hesitate to contact me regarding anything that you would like me to share at the next Executive Committee meeting. Ka kite Michele, [email protected]

Institute Student Reps Institute of Organisational Psychology Karen Tonkin – [email protected] Institute of Educational and Developmental Psychology Veerle Van Cooten – [email protected] Institute of Clinical Psychology Kate Ross-McAlpine – [email protected] Parewahaika Harris – [email protected] Institute of Community Psychology Teah Carlson – [email protected] Institute of Criminal Justice and Forensic Psychology Jessica Scanlan - [email protected] Vacant branch and Institute student rep positions: Central Districts Branch – contact Barbara Kennedy ([email protected]) Page 8

NZPsS 2016 Conference New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference 2016 1-4 September

Mā te mahi kakama, kō atu

WELLINGTON

Where: WELLINGTON, Massey University Thursday 1st to Sunday 4th September Thursday is the pre-conference workshop day CONFERENCE PROGRAMME We have received a huge number of submissions for presentation this year, hence the programme will be very full and have a lot of variety. On most days we will have eight streams running concurrently! The programme will be published on the conference page by beginning of next week (21 June). This will give presenters and delegates enough time to register with the Early Bird rate.

Confirmed keynote speakers: Jennifer Muehlenkamp - is a clinical psychologist and associate professor at University of Wisconsin -Eau Claire. She specializes in understanding and preventing suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury in youth. She has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on self-injury and suicide in adolescents and college students, some of which have informed the non-suicidal self-injury diagnostic category for DSM-V. She is a founding member of the International Society for the Study of Self-Injury, and co-author of a treatment book titled Non-Suicidal Self-Injury that is part of the Advances in Psychotherapy Series. Her research and clinical guidelines are internationally recognized and have earned awards from the American Association of Suicidology. Keynote: NSSI: Beyond Emotion Regulation Workshop: “Cut that Out”: Best Practices for Responding to SelfInjury Suzanne Chambers - Professor at Griffith University. She is a health psychologist who has worked as a practitioner- researcher in psychological support for people with cancer for over 20 years. She Chairs the Quality of Life and Supportive Care Committee for

the Australia and New Zealand UroGenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group. Professor Chambers has published extensively on the psychological effects of cancer and is currently leading large scale randomised control trials of interventions that address couple support and sexuality, lifestyle and unmet supportive care needs, and psychological distress in men with prostate cancer. Keynote: Striving for Relevance: Psycho-oncology, Curve Balls and Saving the Pitch Workshop: Developing and Evaluating Health Interventions in Chronic Disease: Psychosocial care for people affected by cancer Janel Gauthier - is Professor of Psychology at Laval University in Canada, President-Elect of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP), and Canadian Delegate to the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS). He has published over 100 scientific papers and book chapters on the applications of behavioural, cognitive, and social psychology to mental health. Since 2002, ethics has become the main focus of his research and writings. His most recent achievement involves the development of the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists, which was unanimously adopted by IUPsyS and IAAP in 2008 following a six-year process of research and broad international consultation. Professor Gauthier was the chair of the international working group which drafted the Universal Declaration. He has received several awards for his distinguished contributions to the international advancement of psychology and ethics. Jan Jordan - is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Criminology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She has over 20 years experience teaching and researching in the area of women, crime and victimisation. Her major research interest is in sexual violence and she is a regular presenter on police adult sexual assault investigation training courses. She has published

extensively in this area, including the book Serial Survivors in which the survival narratives of women attacked by Auckland serial rapist Malcolm Rewa are presented. Currently she is undertaking work on a research grant awarded by the Marsden Fund of the Royal Society of New Zealand to explore why it remains difficult to achieve substantive change in how women as victims of rape are responded to and treated. Keynote: ‘Rape Culture’: Myth or Reality? Sonja Macfarlane - Senior Lecturer in Health Sciences; Māori Health and Wellbeing, affiliates to the South Island iwi of Ngai Tahu, and the West Coast (Te Tai Poutini) iwi of Ngāti Waewae. Prior to commencing work here at UC, Sonja worked for almost 8 years as the national practice leader: Services to Māori within MoE: SE. This role also enabled her to participate in research and publishing in the areas of Māori education, health and wellbeing, cultural identity and culturally responsive pedagogy. Keynote: The evolving nature of human development theory: Who and how does it fit? Workshop: The problem with conflict… Matthieu Villatte - PhD is a Research Scientist and Clinical Trainer at the Evidence-Based Practice Institute of Seattle, WA in the United States. He obtained his doctoral degree in France, with an emphasis on Relational Frame Theory (a branch of contextual behavioral science studying language and cognition), and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Nevada, Reno under the mentorship of Steven Hayes, PhD. He is the co-author of the first manual published in French on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and is associate editor of the Journal of Contextual Behavior Science. His new book, Mastering the Clinical Conversation: Language as Intervention, is co-authored by Jennifer Villatte and Steven Hayes. Keynote: How to integrate Cognitive Change Strategies to Acceptance and Mindfulness-based Page 9

Therapies? Workshop: Advanced ACT: Getting Experiential Without Exercises

Confirmed guest speakers: Louise Dixon, Julia Rucklidge, Marc Wilson, Antonia Lyons Louise Dixon’s guest address is titled: Understanding and responding to intimate partner violence and abuse: What psychology has to offer Julia Rucklidge’ guest address is titled: Nutritional Therapies for Psychological Symptoms: What is the evidence to date? Antonia Lyons’ guest address is titled: The importance of innovative qualitative research in psychology: Young people, social networking and alcohol

Opening speaker: Charles Waldegrave. Charles is a psychologist and social policy researcher and leads the Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit. He will talk about Bringing our lights out from under the bushel: Practice and research insights that inspire policy change. There will be several speakers who will headline symposia, such as Chris Burt for the health and safety stream. His address is: Managing new employee safety risks: Integrating safety and human resource management practices Associate Professor Michelle Tuckey. The title of her address is: Psychosocial safety at work: Spotlight on safety climate and risk assessment Registration: online registration is now available. Accommodation: options are listed on the website. Check the website for updates: www.psychology.org.nz/ pd-events/annual-conference

Professional Development NZPsS & ACC jointly hosted workshops: Workshop 2- The Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Eileen Swan 29 July in Auckland, 4 August in Wellington and 5 August in Christchurch see the flyer on page 17 Workshop 3- ‘Ki te whakaora’: Sexual Violence trauma - Towards healing for Māori victims/ survivors presented by Julie Wharewera-Mika 11 October Auckland, 13 October Wellington and 18 October Christchurch This workshop will explore understandings of sexual violence for Maori laying foundations to strengthen practice. Bi-cultural approaches in the assessment, intervention and prevention of sexual trauma will be discussed with a focus on enhancing knowledge and the development of useful tools and skills to best support Maori survivors. The flyer will be available soon. NZPsS & ICP jointly hosted workshop: Worried Sick? Extending the application of CBT from health anxiety to medically unexplained symptoms and long term medical conditions. presented by Paul Salkovskis, UK Auckland on Friday 1 July and Christchurch on Monday 4th July see the flyer on page 19 Go to the website for more information about the training and to see updates: http://www.psychology. org.nz/pd-events/nzpss-events or contact Heike at [email protected] You can register for all events online.

WEBINARS

We have a number of excellent webinar recordings on our Members only pages: http://www.psychology.org. nz/members-only/webinars We are now looking for more presenters.

Would you be interested to talk for 10-20 minutes about a psychology area that you feel passionate about?

The webinar process is very easy and requires no technical knowledge - I will even send you the headset. All you need is access to a computer with a camera and a reliable internet connection. It is also not ‘live’ (although if you preferred an interactive webinar we can arrange this too). I hope to hear from you - please contact Heike [email protected] psychology.org.nz

Check out the HUGE discount on the price for Professional Practice of Psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand NOW ONLY $10!! -go to our online bookstore.

Media database

We have established a database with Members we can contact to comment on psychology issues when the media makes contact with the Society and require subject experts. If you are not on our database, but would like to be added, we will send you the questionnaire to complete. Please contact Heike: [email protected]

Page 10

Membership Notices The names of applicants for Full Membership of the NZPsS (and their nominees) approved for ballot, are listed below. Under Rule 11.4, a member who objects to the election of any applicant shall lodge the objection in writing with the Executive Director within 21 days of receipt of this notice. Such objection shall be supported in writing by a second member. An unsupported objection made by one member will be considered only under exceptional circumstances. If no objections are received within the time allowed, these applicants will be confirmed as members of the Society.

Pipiri- June 2016 Members’ Ballot Full members Cambridge BATLEY, Julie B Soc Sci (Hons) Psych, University of Waikato, 2013 C Barber / A Tamatea DAWBER, Alex Auckland Dip Psych, Deakin University, Australia 1996

B Kirker / B George

HOWARD, Victoria Auckland Bachelor of Arts (Psychology), MA (Psychology), Post Graduate Diploma in Psychological Practice, Massey University B Kennedy / D Yeats ISAACSON, Anja Auckland MA (Hons); PGDipClinPsych, Massey University J van Rensburg / N Gaunt JAMES, Ruth Wellington MEdPsych, PGDipEPP, Victoria University of Wellington K Lemmon / Q Abraham KAUR, Gagandeep Auckland MA Appl Psych, Lovely Professional University, India, 2015 N Gaunt / Dr S Bainbridge KENDALL, Virginia Ruth Hamilton Masters in Psychology First class honours in Psychology Undergraduate Bachelor of Social Science, University of Waikato V Isler / L Brindley-Richards LEE, Kyoung Im Auckland PhD Educational Psychology, Pusan National University, Korea B Kirker / K Gibson SKINNER, Katherine Auckland BA in Psychology & Statistics, Master of Health Psychology (hons), PGDipHealthPsych, University of Auckland L Hoyle / L Reynolds

Resigned Ruth Arcus (Retired) Meredith F. Blampied (moved overseas) Frances E. Brinn Helen Foster (Retired) Dr Averil Herbert (Retired) Denise Kirby Anna Marion (Retired) Brian D. Wilson (Retired) Student Welcomes Brylee Creswell – Wellington Abby Dale-Bates - Christchurch Jaimi Flood – Auckland Ellie Fourie – Auckland Walter John Hamer – Auckland Miriam Hannah – Hamilton Ashwin Mathur – Auckland Geoffrey Michael Sutton – Christchurch Priyanka Nair – Auckland Darius Paschke – Christchurch Mark Strang – Auckland Sharlene H Vere-Jones – Auckland Tangihaere Walker – Wellington Nicole Waru - Hamilton Sophie Watt – Auckland Melissa Whitton - Hamilton Chris Wu - Christchurch Angelique Zidich - Christchurch Elena Zubielevitch – Auckland

Institute Welcomes ICP- Clinical Psychology Jessie Mee (student member) IHP- Health Psychology Hamish McIntosh, Auckland IEDP -Educational Psychology Bernadette Cook - Nelson Karma Galyer – Auckland Miriam (Chae Ok) Jun (Student Member) – Auckland

Ruth James - Wellington Rebecca Patchett - Nelson Aloma Parker – Auckland Rachel Rachmani (Student Member) – Hamilton IOP- Organisational Psychology Steven J. Langdon (Student Member), Auckland ICounsPsy - Counselling Psychology Jaimi Flood (Student Member) – Auckland Ellie Fourie (Student Member) – Auckland Amanda Gilmour (Student Member) – Auckland Walter John Hamer (Student Member) – Auckland Dana (Daeun) Lee (Student Member) – Auckland Moon Lee (Student Member) – Auckland Priyanka Nair (Student Member) – Auckland

New Zealand Psychological Society PO Box 25271, Featherston Street, Wellington 6146 www.psychology.org.nz phone: 04 4734884; fax: 04 4734889; email: [email protected] Disclaimer: Publication of material in, or distribution of material with, Connections does not constitute endorsement by the Society of any views expressed. Equally, advertisements are accepted for publication at the discretion of the Editor, having regard to the perceived relevance to NZPsS members of the products or services advertised. Their inclusion does not constitute endorsement by the Society. The Editor reserves the right to edit all copy for publication. © This material is copyrighted to the Society. Page 11

News Bytes & Resources Pause, Breathe, Smile, the Mental Health Foundation’s unique mindfulness in schools programme, is supporting Kiwi kids to focus their attention and let go of worry, anxiety and doubt. A recent study of Pause, Breathe, Smile found it is making a lasting impact on children’s wellbeing. Common Ground is a programme that helps adults support the young people in their lives to manage hard times and enjoy happier days. Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin-25 May 2016

National youth forensic mental health unit opens A $15.3 million national youth forensic mental health unit at Kenepuru Hospital in Porirua is now open. The secure unit, the first of its kind in New Zealand, has 10 beds for vulnerable young offenders with a mental illness or alcohol and drug problems.

Risk of Suicide after Concussion Authors M. Fralick et al. examined records of 235,110 adults diagnosed with a concussion over a 20-year period footprint books (1 April 1992 to 31 March 2012) in Ontario, Canada. Severe cases that resulted in hospital admission were excluded. The study assessed the long-term risk of suicide after concussions occurring on weekends or weekdays in the community. Those who had sustained a concussion had 3 times the rate of suicide! And if the concussion occurred over a weekend the risk increased by a further third. In footprint addition, one-half of those who killed themselves .com.au visited a doctor in the last week of life. Reference: Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2016;188(7):497-504 Source: GP Research Review. Issue 109, 2016

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Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin-11 May 2016

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• Attractive pricing with members only discount; • Priority treatment on all orders; footprint • Special ‘pre-publication’ offers on selected .com.au footprint.com.au new books Life Long Learning Life Longupdates Learning • Ongoing on new books as they become available; • Competitions for book vouchers; • Free delivery on all orders. TM

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Source: Mental Health Foundation E-Bulletin-11 May 2016

Bicultural praxis: The relevance of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to health promotion internationally Came, H. & Tudor, K. (2016). International Journal of Health Promotion & Education, 1-9. The transformation of health inequities between indigenous and non-indigenous people is necessary to any just society. The paper revisits the timeline leading to the signing of Te Tiriti and reviews the significance of Te Tiriti to health promotion practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

footprint books

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The business of human rights (2016). Wellington: Human Rights Commission. The guide gives a broad introduction to human rights, their relevance to business activities and provides a practical framework to get your company on board.

footprint

Rendered / Web Use

To access your 20% member discount off the RRP on the website, simply enter the code NZPFB41 in the coupon code box and add your membership number in the ‘special instructions’ box at the checkout. You will also need these details if you order by phone/email or fax. Contact the friendly customer service team at [email protected] or call +61 2 9997 3973 if you have any questions.

www.footprint.com.au Page 12

Events Calendar NEW ZEALAND EVENTS *9 July, 2016 Rotorua “H.U.G. Your baby - help understanding and guidance for young families”. For more information please see http://www.breastfeedingconferences.com.au/hug-yourbaby-conference-list.htm *16 July, 2016 Wellington Advanced Hynosis Training. For more information please email [email protected] *28 July - 3 August, 2016 Nelson, Te Whare Mahana Trust Part 1 DBT Intensive Trainingwith Professor Alan Fruzzetti. For more information please see http://www.twm.org.nz/dbt-residentialprogramme/dbt-intensive-training *24-26 August, 2016 Auckland The MHS Conference 2016. For more information please see http://www.themhs.org/pages/ themhs-conference-2016.html *31 August, 2016 Auckland Unplanned Change and Uncertainty in Career Decisions with Professor Bright. For more infromation please see https://jim-bright.lilregie.com/step1 *9 September, 2016 Christchurch “When mortification knocks” workshop hosted by NZCCP Canterbury Branch. For more information please see http://www.nzccp.co.nz/events/ workshops-and-seminars/when-mortification-knocks-anexploration-of-shame-and-its-relevance-to-distress-andtherapy/ *15 September, 2016 Wellington Hold Me Tight Weekly Course commencing 15 September, 2016 For more information email [email protected] *15-16 September, 2016 Auckland. Master Class: Adults and Older Adolescents with ASD Level 1 (Asperger’s Syndrome) For more information please see http://www.mindsandhearts. net/ * 17 September, 2016 Auckland. Emotion Management with Children and Teens with ASD. For more information please see http://www.mindsandhearts.net/ *12-14 October, 2016 Christchurch RANZCP 2016 NZ Conference. For more information please see https://outshine. eventsair.com/QuickEventWebsitePortal/nzranzcp-16/web *25 November, 2016 Auckland The 5th Aotearoa New Zealand Organisational Psychology and Organisational Behaviour Conference. For more information please email rachel. [email protected]; *2-4 March, 2017 Nelson 42nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the New Zealand Pain Society Inc. For more information please see https://www.eiseverywhere.com//ehome/174204?eb=304006

*9-15 March, 2017 Nelson, Te Wahre Mahana Trust Part 2 DBT Intensive Training with Professor Alan Fruzzetti. For more information please see http://www.twm.org.nz/dbt-residentialprogramme/dbt-intensive-training OVERSEAS EVENTS *19-27 June, 2016 Melbourne Australia Comprehensive DBT Training. For more information plesae click here http://www. bpdaustralia.com/new-events/ *22-25 June, 2016 Melbourne, Australia. 8th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioural therapy. For more information please see http://www.wcbct2016.com.au/ *6 July, 2016, Manchester UK UK Oil & Gas: Planning and Environment Summit. For more information please see http://www.openforumconferences.co.uk/link. php?M=4072478&N=2135&L=354&F=H *10-14 July, 2016 Vilnius, Lithuania 24th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development. For more information please see www.issbd2016.com *13-14 July, 2016 Brisbane, Australia Challenging The Mental Illness-Violence Nexus. For more information see https://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/mental-illnessviolence-conference *18-20 July, 2016 London, England 11th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. For more information see http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/ResearchCentres/Centre-for-Applied-Research-and-Assessment-inChild-and-Adolescent-Wellbeing/Child-and-AdolescentPsychopathology-Conference/ *24 - 29 July 2016, Yokohama, Japan. “31st International Congress of Psychology’”. See www.icp2016.jp/index.html for more information. *15-19 August, 2016 Copenhagen Denmark 3rd International Conference on Time Perspective. For more information please click here https://itpnetwork.wordpress.com/ *23-27 August, 2016 Aberdeen, Scotland. 30th Conference of the European Health Psychology Society and the British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology. For more information please see http://www.ehps2016.org/index.html *26-28 August, 2016 Colombo, Sri Lanka Third Consectutive International Conference on Applied Psychology. For more information please see http://www.icapsrilanka.com/ *31 August - 4 September, 2016 The International Organization

of Psychophysiology 18th World Congress, Havana Cuba. For more information please see http://iop2016.cneuro.cu/generalinformation/invitation-letter *12 - 14 September, 2016 Adelaide, Australia 2016 Global Indigenous Men’s Conference and 2016 World Indigenous Women’s Conference. For more information please see http:// www.indigenousconferences.com/ *15 September, 2016 London UK Mental Health: Forward Thinking – Delivering the Strategy. For more information please see http://www.openforumevents.co.uk/mental-healthforward-thinking-delivering-strategy-programme/?utm_so urce=s1+MH+LDN+CHARITY8+09%2F06&utm_ medium=email&utm_campaign=S1+MENTAL+HEALTH+LDN *3-15 October, 2016 , Cambodia 2nd International Conference on Children & Families 2016. For more information please see http://www.iccf2016.org/ *17-19 October, 2016 Cairns, Australia WFMH International Conference. For more information please see http://www. wfmh2016.com/ *26-28 October, 2016 Dublin, Ireland. 5th International Conference on Violence in the Health Sector. For more information please see http://www.oudconsultancy.nl/ dublin_5_ICWV/violence/registrationandp.html *27 October, 2016 London UK Palliative & End of Life Care: Supporting Patient Choice. For more information please see http://www.palliativeandendoflifecare.co.uk/#register?utm_so urce=S2+P%26EOLC+ALL+PAST+O%2FC+10%2F06&utm_ medium=email&utm_campaign=S2+Palliative+%26+End+of+L ife+Care+2016 *7-11 November, 2016 Port au Prince, Haiti. For more information please see http://www.crcp2016.org/ *14-17 November, 2016 Manilla Phillippines The 5th International Workshop on Psychological Intervention After Disasters (PIAD). For more information please see http://www. iupsys.net/events/capacity-building-workshops/index.html *23-25 March, 2017 Vienna Austria International Convention of Psychological Science. For more information please see http:// icps.psychologicalscience.org/ *July 2017 - June 2017 Indigenous Conferences, please see http://www.indigenousconferences.com/ for conference details including dates and locations

Page 13

Request for Assistance A survey of Psychologists conducting cognitive and neuropsychological assessments with New Zealand children Kia ora kou tou My name is Kate Ross-McAlpine and as part of my DClinPsych research I am investigating aspects of neuropsychological assessment with New Zealand children. I am currently seeking psychologists who administer cognitive and neuropsychological assessments with children as part of their practice, to complete – an online survey which will ask about use of specific measures and your professional opinions in regards to the cultural context of assessing children in New Zealand. All survey responses will be kept completely anonymous. The project has been evaluated by peer review and judged to be low risk. Consequently, it has not been reviewed by one of the University’s Human Ethics Committees. The researchers named in this document are responsible for the ethical conduct of this research. If you have any concerns about the conduct of this research that you want to raise with someone other than the researcher(s), please contact Dr Brian Finch, Director - Ethics, telephone 06 3569099 ext 86015, email [email protected] If you are interested in participating in the survey, please find the link below: Cognitive and Neuropsychological assessment with children If the link above does not work, please try the link below: https://qau1.au1.qualtrics.com/ SE/?SID=SV_3NKKU0mo0Me1Z2t Please feel free to pass this on to other psychologists who complete cognitive and neuropsychological assessments with children, who may be interested in participating. Thank you very much for your time. Nga mihi, Kate Ross-McAlpine

PD Opportunities

Advertising

Are you a psychologist who identifies with an Asian background? You are invited to participate in doctoral research on your unique experiences and perspectives as an Asian mental health professional working in New Zealand. -

How does your background influence your encounters with clients? How do you work with clients from your own culture and across other cultures? What personal and professional challenges have you experienced? How do you see cultural competence in relation to you?

This study encourages you to reflect on your experiences of working with your own and others’ cultures (including the dominant culture). To date there has been no research on the views of Asian mental health professionals and their experiences in New Zealand. Yet, this is vital for professionals to develop cultural competence in a diverse society.

School of Psychology Human Sciences Building Floor 6 10 Symonds Street Telephone 64 9 373 7599 Facsimile 64 9 373 7450 Private Bag 92019 Auckland, New Zealand The University of Auckland Private Bag 92019 Auckland, New Zealand

The study involves individual interviews of approximately 1-2 hours conducted at a time and place that suits you, and a brief questionnaire completed at the start of the interview. You will receive a $20 grocery or petrol voucher as a thank you for your participation. Any psychologist who self-identifies with having an Asian background or identity can participate (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Southeast Asian…). If you live outside of Auckland, please do not hesitate to get in touch as I can travel or interview by Skype or phone. If you are interested or have any questions about the study, please contact Jennifer Liu at: [email protected] Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 30-11-15 for 3 years, reference number 016477

Page 14

November 2016 Trauma Education

Leah is a Sydney-based doctorallevel clinical psychologist with 20 years of clinical and teaching expertise in CBT and traumatology

presented by Dr Leah Giarratano

Two highly regarded CPD activities for all mental health professionals: 14 hours for each activity These workshops are endorsed by the, AASW, ACA and ACMHN

Clinical skills for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (Treating PTSD) This two-day (8:30am-4:30pm) program presents a highly practical and interactive workshop (case-based) for treating traumatised clients; the content is applicable to both adult and adolescent populations. The techniques are cognitive behavioural, evidence-based, and will be immediately useful and effective for your clinical practice. The emphasis is upon imparting immediately practical skills and up-to-date research in this area. 3-4 November 2016, Sydney CBD

17-18 November 2016, Melbourne CBD

Clinical skills for treating complex trauma (Treating Complex Trauma) This two-day (8:30am-4:30pm) program focuses upon phase-based treatment for adult survivors of child abuse and neglect. In order to attend, participants must have first completed the ‘Treating PTSD’ program. The workshop completes Leah’s four-day trauma-focused training. The content is applicable to both adult and adolescent populations. The program incorporates practical, current experiential techniques showing promising results with this population; techniques are drawn from EFTT, Metacognitive Therapy, Schema Therapy, attachment pathology treatment, ACT, CBT, and DBT. 10-11 November 2016, Sydney CBD

24-25 November 2016, Melbourne CBD

Program Fee for each activity is in Australian Dollars (AUD) $550 AUD (when you email this form to pay for an Australian workshop with a Visa or Master card) Please note this reduced price only applies if you live and work in New Zealand and travel to Sydney or Melbourne Program fee includes written materials, lunches, morning and afternoon teas on each workshop day Please direct your enquiries to Joshua George on: [email protected] For more details about these offerings and books by Leah Giarratano refer to www.talominbooks.com 2016 Trauma Education Registration Form for NZPS Please circle the workshop/s you wish to attend above and return a scanned copy of this completed page Profession:

Name: Address: Phone:

Email (*essential*):

Mobile:

Special dietary requirements:

Method of payment (circle one)

Visa

MasterCard

Name of cardholder:

Expiry Date:

Card Number:

Card Verification Number:

Signature of card holder:

Debit amount in Australian Dollars: $

Credit card payment is preferred. Simply complete the information above, scan and email this page [email protected] A receipt will be emailed to you upon processing. Note: Attendee withdrawals and transfers attract a processing fee of $55 AUD. No withdrawals are permitted in the seven days prior to the workshop; however positions are transferable to anyone you nominate

Join our team Active+ is one of the largest multi-disciplinary organisations in New Zealand, delivering a wide scope of services to ACC from Northland through to Palmerston North. We are contract holders for the ACC Psychological Services which has recently opened to allow Health Psychologists to deliver services. We also deliver Training for Independence, Sensitive Claims and Pain Management programmes all of which require psychology input as part of our multi-disciplinary team. If you are interested in joining our large and supportive psychology team to deliver any of these services, please be in touch with the managing director Gill Webb on: E [email protected] PH 021 623 811 activeplus.co.nz

+

We are looking for experienced Clinical Psychologists, who are professional, selfmotivated and collegial to join our busy Dunedin practice. You would be working as a sole trader under the umbrella of Psychology Associates Ltd alongside ten other clinicians in a warm, inviting, central city office in a lovely heritage building. The work is varied as our clients present with a range of difficulties, and we hold several ACC contracts, and provide EAP assistance to local businesses and service organisations. Hours of work can be flexible between 0.4 and 1.0 EFT and administration services and referrals are provided.

If you are interested in working with us, please contact [email protected] for more information.

Workshop flyers

The New Zealand Psychological Society & ACC are proud to host:

The Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Violence Trauma presented by Eileen Swan Auckland 29 July, Wellington 4 August, Christchurch 5 August 2016 - 9.30am to 5.00pm 9.30 – 10.00am Impact on clients (children, young people and adults) and their family/ whanau of trauma and diagnoses/PTSD associated with sexual violence. 10.00 - 10.45am Support for clients who have experienced sexual violence, services offered by ACC to sexual violence clients, ways in which practitioners can work with ACC to offer services. 10.45 - 11.15am Morning tea 11.15 - 12.30pm Assessment – aims/ methodology of assessment of clients with PTSD and complex trauma associated with sexual violence trauma and other mental health issues - including cultural considerations, male and female clients, differing ages, intellectual and physical disability.

3.00 – 3.30pm Afternoon Tea 3.30 - 5.00pm How to further develop skills in assessment and treatment; quality professional supervision/self-care strategies/ support. Eileen Swan has been a clinical psychologist for nearly thirty years – she was previously a registered nurse. She conducted research prior to the opening of HELP in Auckland in 1982 and was the first coordinator for HELP

until 1984. Eileen then spent six years working as a psychologist and family therapist at the Leslie 12.30 - 1.30pm Lunch - An ACC Centre establishing a team to work with representative will be available to answer families who had experienced sexual violence any question in regards to ACC procedures. and with other families with a wide range 1.30 - 3.00pm Assessment contd/Treatment of presenting problems, including Family - evidence-based treatment approaches for Court referrals. She was then Managing clients with PTSD and complex trauma Psychologist, Specialist Services, Child Youth associated with sexual violence trauma, and Family for four years before spending consideration of situations when other mental three years in West Berkshire, England. health issues coexist. Reporting back to During this time Eileen worked in primary ACC. care, health psychology and the Wallingford

(now Oxford) Forensic Service. After her return to New Zealand she spent one year at the Department of Corrections Te Piriti Sex Offender Treatment Unit, Paremoremo and then worked as a manager in Mental Health Services at the ADHB while also working in private practice, providing assessment and treatment for a variety of presentations. Eileen was then Cinical Team Leader at RASNZ (Refugees as Survivors) for three years. She currently works at ACC as a Branch Advisory Psychologist and in private practice. For many years Eileen conducted training and supervision in assessment and therapy for sexual trauma for a variety of professionals and presented at national and international conferences.

Venues

Auckland: Jubilee Hall, Parnell Trust, 545 Parnell Road, Parnell Wellington: Level 1, Mercure Abel Tasman Hotel, 169 Willis Street Christchurch: Conference room, YMCA Christchurch, 12 Hereford Street

Online registration available here: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/nzpssevents/#cid=884&wid=301 REGISTRATION & TAX INVOICE

PAYMENT

All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864

Name ...................................................................................... City.......................................................................................... E-Mail .................................................................................... Phone .....................................................................................

Auckland - 29 July Wellington - 4 August Christchurch - 5 August Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. If your employer is paying for your registration please ensure your payment is referenced with your surname. Cancellation: Up to 14 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 14 working days before event – no refund but named substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified. The NZPsS reserves the right to cancel the workshop, with not less than 10 days notice, should there be insufficient registrations.

I accept the booking conditions Signed ..................................................................................... Date ........................................................................................ Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

register online (see link above) or scan and email completed form to: [email protected] or fax to: 04 4734889 or post to PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146

NZPsS Member

$190.00

Non Member

$220.00

NZPsS Student

$50.00

Non NZPsS Student

$80.00

Cost (incl. GST) covers: • •

m/tea, lunch, a/tea workshop materials

I have special dietary requirements (please specify).......................................................... Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: New Zealand Psychological Society BNZ, 02-0560-0262471-000 Payment reference ................................... Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

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Cardholder Name .................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../.......................

Worried Sick? Extending the application of cognitive behavioural approaches, from health anxiety to medically unexplained symptoms and long term medical conditions. Prof Paul Salkovskis, UK 1st July 2016 in Christchurch, 9.00am - 4.30pm Quality Hotel Elms, 456 Papanui Road 4th July 2016 in Auckland, 9.00am- 4.30pm Sorrento in the Park, 670 Manukau Rd, Royal Oak Background: Cognitive behavioural approaches to health anxiety have been shown to be effective in RCTs in people where the main presenting problem is anxiety focussed on health, and in those seeking medical help in hospital found to have high levels of health anxiety. There are also indications that CBT could be effective in Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS) and in Long Term Physical Health problems (LTC) associated with relatively severe psychological distress. Purpose of workshop: In this workshop, the theoretical and clinical underpinnings of CBT for health anxiety on its own and linked to MUS and LTC will be described, starting with the success of CBT and identifying its limitations in this context. The importance of using a transdiagnostic approach as a way of ensuring high quality therapy is considered in the context of the need to address the specific issues in diverse problems such as chronic pain, irritable bowel, chronic fatigue and so on. The result is a new hybrid transdiagnostic/specific approach, with core elements including engagement and developing a shared understanding supplemented by “modules” addressing specific aspects of MUS in the later stages of treatment, with behavioural experiments cutting across both aspects of the treatment. Treatment fundamentals and details will be discussed and, where possible, demonstrated. Time will be allowed for

discussion of cases brought by participants who are prepared to role-play their clients. Suitable for: All clinicians interested in working with these problems, including but not confined to clinical psychologists, general practitioners, psychiatrists, nurse therapists and so on. Professor Paul Salkovskis, B.Sc., M.Phil. (Clin. Psychol), PhD, C.Psychol., FBPsS Paul Salkovskis is currently Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, London and Clinical Director at the Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust. He is editor of “Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy”, the official scientific journal of the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. He completed his training at the Institute of Psychiatry in the late 70s, after which he worked as a full time clinician in the health service, also conducting research as part of this work. He

subsequently transferred to a clinical research position in 1985 at the University of Oxford; at the time he left in 2000, his title was Professor of Cognitive Psychology. His transfer to an academic position did not interfere with his commitment to clinical work, which continues at a high level to the present day. His main contributions have been in the areas of cognitive models and treatments of anxiety disorders and in health psychology. His theoretical paper (in 1985) on a cognitive theory of Obsessive compulsive disorder was a synthesis of the work of Beck and Rachman, and highlighted the role of the way in which intrusions were interpreted as a sign of “responsibility” for harm or its prevention. Such interpretations were described as motivating compulsive behaviour, paving the way for new cognitive strategies for the treatment of OCD. He worked closely with David M Clark on the development and validation of the cognitive model of Panic Disorder, and with Hilary Warwick on severe and persistent Health Anxiety (“Hypochondriasis”). With all of these disorders he has developed and refined innovative cognitive-behavioural treatment strategies. Paul also developed the concept of “safety seeking behaviour”, highlighting its role in the maintenance and treatment of anxiety disorders. This influential work has resulted in new ways of thinking about the use of behavioural strategies in cognitive therapy, resulting in a proper integration rather than a hybridized approach. In health psychology he has researched aspects of health screening and developed the concept of “evidence based patient choice”. More recently he and his team have been considering issues including dissemination of treatment and the application of the cognitive model of health anxiety to chronic pain.

TIMES: 9.00am -4.30pm (10.30am m/tea, 12.30pm lunch, 3.00pm a/tea) ONLINE REGISTRATION AVAILABLE HERE: http://www.psychology.org.nz/pd-events/ nzpss-events/#cid=884&wid=301 REGISTRATION Name ........................................................................................................ City ........................................................................................................... E-Mail ....................................................................................................... Phone ....................................................................................................... Christchurch, 1 July Auckland, 4 July I have special dietary requirements: ....................................

PAYMENT/ TAX INVOICE All prices are GST Inclusive - GST Number 42-486-864 includes m/and a/tea and lunch ICP member

$100.00

NZPsS member

$190.00

Non member

$230.00

ICP Students

$20.00

NZPsS Students

$40.00

..................................................................................................................... Booking Conditions: Places confirmed only upon receipt of registration and full payment. Cancellation: Up to 5 working days before event – refund less 20% administration fee. Less than 5 working days before event – no refund but substitutes will be accepted if the Society is notified.

I accept the booking conditions Once payment for your registration has been processed you will receive a confirmation letter. If you do not receive a letter within two weeks of registering please contact the Professional Development Coordinator: [email protected]

Payment method: Please tick one box Cheque payable to: NZ Psychological Society Inc Direct Credit Payment to: NZ Psychological Society 02-0560-0262471-000 Payment reference: Salk & your name Credit Card Payments: MasterCard or Visa only. Card Number:

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Cardholder Name ....................................................................... Expiry Date: .................../....................... EMAIL completed form to: [email protected] or post to: NZPsS, PO Box 25271, Featherston St, Wellington 6146 or fax to: 04 4734889

New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference 2016 1-4 September

Mā te mahi kakama, kō atu

WELLINGTON

REGISTRATION FORM Early Bird Registrations close 1 July 2016 Delegate Information Name (for Name badge): ____________________________________________________________________ City: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________

Email: __________________________________________

Special requirements e.g. dietary, disabilities etc. _________________________________________________

How to Register Please select the option for your membership/subscriber status at the time of conference overleaf. Mail this completed form with your cheque or credit card payment or invoice purchase order to: NZ Psychological Society, PO Box 25271, Featherston Street, Wellington 6140 - or fax this to: 04 4734889 - or scan and email: [email protected] - Online registration and payment is also available on the NZPsS Events page.

Confirmation of Registration Your registration will be confirmed on receipt of your completed form and payment. A confirmation letter/ GST receipt / invoice will be sent to you via email within 7 days. If you have a registration query please contact: [email protected] or call 04 914 1983

Cancellation Policy Cancellations before 1 August 2016, registration refunded less 20% administration fee. After 1 August 2016 no refund but a named substitute can be accepted. I accept the booking conditions and cancellation policy

Privacy The information supplied on this form will be used by the NZ Psychological Society. The Privacy Act requires, that before your name and email address can be published you must give your consent. Unless you advice us below, your name and email address will be included in the list of delegates for distribution to fellow delegates and the exhibitors who are present at the conference. Please indicate if you DO NOT wish your name and details to be included in the list of delegates

1 Conference and full-day workshop package

Please tick your workshop(s) below

Early Bird closes 1 July

Full Members

Early Bird

$ 630.00

Standard

$ 725.00

$ ______________________

Non Members

Early Bird

$ 680.00

Standard

$ 782.00

$ ______________________

NZPsS Student

Early Bird

$ 150.00

Standard

$ 173.00

$ ______________________

Non NZPsS Student*

Early Bird

$ 250.00

Standard

$ 288.00

$ ______________________

2 Conference and half-day workshop package

Please tick your workshop below

Early Bird closes 1 July

Full Members

Early Bird

$ 510.00

Standard

$ 587.00

$ ______________________

Non Members

Early Bird

$ 560.00

Standard

$ 644.00

$ ______________________

NZPsS Student

Early Bird

$ 150.00

Standard

$ 173.00

$ ______________________

Non NZPsS Student*

Early Bird

$ 200.00

Standard

$ 230.00

$ ______________________

Full Conference (does not include workshops)

Early Bird closes 1 July

Full Members

Early Bird

$ 450.00

Standard

$ 518.00

$ ______________________

Non Members

Early Bird

$ 500.00

Standard

$ 575.00

$ ______________________

NZPsS Student

Early Bird

$ 100.00

Standard

$ 115.00

$ ______________________

Non NZPsS Student*

Early Bird

$ 150.00

Standard

$ 173.00

$ ______________________

Conference Day Registration (does not include workshops) Friday

Saturday

Early Bird closes 1 July

Sunday PLEASE TICK THE DAY YOU WILL ATTEND

Full Members

Early Bird

$ 170.00

Standard

$ 195.00

$ ______________________

Non Members

Early Bird

$ 220.00

Standard

$ 253.00

$ ______________________

NZPsS Student

Early Bird

$ 50.00

Standard

$ 58.00

$ ______________________

Non NZPsS Student*

Early Bird

$ 80.00

Standard

$ 92.00

$ ______________________

Workshops on Thursday 1 September 2016 Member Non-Member NZPsS Student Non NZPsS Student* J Muehlenkamp

9.00am - 5.00pm

$200.00

$250.00

$50.00

$100.00

$ ______________________

S Macfarlane

9.00am - 5.00pm $200.00

$250.00

$50.00

$100.00

$ ______________________

M Villatte

9.00am - 5.00pm $200.00

$250.00

$50.00

$100.00

$ ______________________

J Gauthier

9.00am - 5.00pm $200.00

$250.00

$50.00

$100.00

$ ______________________

S Chambers

9.00am - 12.30pm $100.00

$150.00

$ 30.00

$ 60.00

$ _______________________

Social Events I will be attending the Welcome Function, Friday 2nd

free for conference delegates

I will be bringing a guest to the Welcome Function

$40.00 $ _______________________

I will be attending the Conference Dinner, Saturday 3rd

$75.00 $ _______________________

I will be bringing a guest to the Conference Dinner

$75.00 $ ______________________

Payment Details

*Non NZPsS Students need to enclose a photocopy of their current student ID to receive a discounted rate PAYMENT - All prices are INCLUSIVE of GST - GST Number 42-486-868 Method of Payment Cheque, payable to New Zealand Psychological Society Inc.

FINAL TOTAL $ ___________________

Direct Credit payment to: Bank of New Zealand, NZ Psychological Society, 02-0560-0262471-00 (reference with your surname/

company name)

Date of payment: _____________________ Credit Card payment (MasterCard or Visa only) Cardholder Name: ______________________________________________ Expiry Date ____________ Card Number:

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scan/email/fax/mail this completed form - see details over