144

CITIZENS LEAGUE REPORT No. 144 Minneapolis Public Schools $5 Million School Bond Issue August 1962 ABPRQ VET; C i t ...

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CITIZENS LEAGUE REPORT No. 144

Minneapolis Public Schools $5 Million School Bond Issue

August 1962

ABPRQ VET; C i t i z e n s League 545 Mobil O i l Building Minneapolis 2, Minnesota

B e j a ~ zCOC Z ~ I R E C T O ~ ~ S DAf E

TO :

Board of Directors

FROM:

Special School Building Committee, Archie Spencer, ChaSrman

SUBJECT:

$5

X i l l i o n School Bond Referendum, MAJOR CONCLUSIONS

1, A s u b s t a n t i a l increase i n t h e present r a t e of expenciiture f o r school cons t r u c t i o n and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n i s needed if t h e Minneapolis Public School System i s t o provide an adequate and equal educational opportunity f o r our children..

2, The development of a 15-20 year long-range school construction and rehabilit a t i o n program i s e s s e n t i a l if we a r e t o be reasonably assured t h a t wasteful cons t r u c t i o n and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n w i l l be avoided md t h a t a b e t t e r educational offering will be provided by expenditure of t h e same number of dollars. While t h e proposed $5 m i l l i o n program i s not a long-range program, consultants have already beon retained t o a i d i n t h e formulation of such a program and it is unlikely t h a t any of the p r o j e c t s included i n the &5rrillion program would c o n f l i c t with possible recomrnend& ions by t h e consultants.

3. The proposed $5 million program w i l l not narrow the range of a l t e r n a t i v e plans f o r m e t i n g long-range school needs which the consultants may wish t o consider. It a l s o does not move i n the d i r e c t i o n of f u r t h e r widening t h e present s u b s t a n t i a l enrollment v a r i a t i o n s azzong schools nor does it conflict with any of t h e other guidi n g p r i n c i p l e s s t a t e d in our Play 23 report.

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4. Although i n our Hay 23 report, we o f f e r e d t h r e e a l t e r n a t i v e m a n s other t o meet the need t o provide urgently needsd f a c i l i t i e s u n t i l such than a bond issue time a s the long-range program can be formulated, we believe t h a t the proposed $5 m i l l i o n bond i s s u e i s a v a l i d means of meeting these needs.

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5 Although t h e documentatimn and supporting d a t a a r e inadequate f o r a d e t a i l e d evaluation of the proposed $5 million program, a l l of t h e school building p r o j e c t s which wauld be financed by the bond i s s u e appear t o be needed, none would be l i k e l y t o c o n f l i c t with possible recommendations by the consultants and some a r e needed urgent l y , 6, Preliminary recommendations should be forthcoming from t h e consultants probably i n January. If the bond i s s u e passes, no s u b s t a n t i a l funds w i l l l i k e l y be committed by t h a t time. We presume t h a t t h e School Board and administration w i l l delay o r r e v i s e work on p r o j e c t s which appear t o c o n f l i c t with t h e consultantst preliminary conclusions. The Citizens League w i l l continually review the authorized p r o j e c t s i n l i g h t of the consultantst recormnendations. REICOrnNDrn I O N

We recommend t h e approval of t h e primary election,

$5

m i l l i o n school bond i s s u e at t h e September

COrnIENDAT I O N

We commnd t h e Minneapolis Board of Education and i t s s t a f f f o r engaging cons u l t a n t s t o formulate a long-range school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program and f o r t h e i r decision t o d e f e r t h e bulk of t h e previously proposed $l7 m i l l i o n program u n t i l t h e completion of a long-range program. SUMMARY By p u l l i n g t o g e t h e r our g m e r a l observations and conclusions about each specif i c p r o j e c t contained i n t h e proposed $5 million program, t h e following summary conc l u s i o n s would seem indicated:

1. Urgent needs, together with t h e l a c k of any apparent c o n f l i c t with longrange b a s i c p o l i c y decisions, would seem t o j u s t i f y inclusion i n t h e $5 m i l l i o n program of: The $75,000 needed t o complete t h e a d d i t i o n of Burroughs Elementary School, b. The $300,000 a l l o c a t e d f o r t h e a d d i t i o n and f a c i l i t i e s a t Southwest. c. The $1,000,000 which appears t o be necessary tg provide a d d i t i o n a l f a e i l i t i e s and capacity a t Washburn t o a t o t a l somewhere midway between t h e present capacity of 1,397 and t h e f u t u r e a n t i c i p a t e d enrollment o f 2,000. d m The $825,000 proposed f o r e i t h e r permanent a d d i t i o n s o r portable c l a s s rooms a t various elementary schools throughout t h e City. a,

2. Although few urgent needs have been demonstrated t h e r e would appear t o be no s e r i o u s adverse e f f e c t s l i k e l y from a l l o c a t i n g funds i n the $5 million program t o finance: The construction of an a d d i t i o n at F i e l d Uementary School. The improvements proposed a t Lincoln School. The r e h a b i l i t a t i o n , modernization and provision o f a d d i t i o n a l f a c i l i t i e s a t Roosevelt. d. The r e h a b i l i t a t i o n , modernization and provision o f .'additional' f aci-.. l i t i e s a t North, e. The r e h a b i l i t a t i o n of Sheridan School. f a The s t a r t of s i t e a c q u i s i t i o n f o r a replacerrent f o r Warrington School s i n c e no decision would be made on t h i s u n t i l t h e consultants have made a recommendation. g. S i t e a c q u i s i t i o n f o r a new Franklin J u n i o r High School.

3. Because of t h e l a c k of a long-range construction program, it was proper t o exc1ud.e from t h e $5 m i l l i o n program funds f o r : A new South Junior-Senior High School. An a d d i t i o n to Sheridan Elementary-Junior High School. Additional classroom space a t TFJashburn beyond t h a t needed t o serve Flashburn's present enrollment. d m Construction designed t o increase the capacity a t Roosevelt f o r t h e a n t i c i p a t e d increased enrollment.

a. b. c.

a, f,

Construction designed t o increase t h e capacity at North f o r t h e a n t i c i p a t e d f u t u r e enrolLient , Construction of a replacement f o r Warrington Elementary School,

In summary, none of t h e p r o j e c t s included i n t h e proposed project i s l i k e l y t o c o n f l i c t s e r i o u s l y with recommendations which might be made by t h e consultants, While a number of p r o j e c t s appear t o be l e s s than urgent, o t h e r s should be s t a r t e d a s soon a s possible and a l l appear t o be needed. Therefore, we endorse t h e l i s t of p r o j e c t s which has been recomnmnded by t h e school administration and approved by t h e Board of Education f o r inclusion in t h e proposed $15 million school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program, BACKGROUND AND RECENT DEPELOPIJENTS

On January 9, 1962 t h e Minneapolis Board of Education approved a 5-year $25 million school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program f o r community consideration and submission t o t h e voters. The Board of Education separated t h e $25 m i l l i o n program i n t o one p o r t i o n of $8 million, which could be programmed without being r e f e r r e d t o t h e voters, and a $17 million portion which was scheduled t o be s u b n i t t e d t o t h e v o t e r s a t t h e September primary e l e c t i o n , Emst of t h e ?.$I m i l l i o n p o r t i o n was a l l o cated f o r new construction, while most of the $8 million portion was t o be s p e n t f o r r e h a b i l i t a t i o n p r o j e c t s , On January 3, t h e C i t i z e n s League's Board of Directors approved t h e establishment of a s p e c i a l committee t o review the proposed program and r e p o r t back i t s findings and recommendat ions. The s p e c i a l committee reviewed the proposed program and submitted a 50 page r e p o r t which was approved by t h e C i t i z e n s League's Board of Directors on May 23. (A number of t h e conclusions and observations presented i n t h i s r e p o r t a r e based upon t h e May 23 report.) Among t h e recommendations contained i n t h e M a y 23 r e p o r t were the following: 1. We urge t h e Minneapolis Board of Educahion t o reconsider i t s declared i n t e n t i o n of sabmitting t h s proposed 5-year school construct i o n and r e h a b i l i t a t i o r , progran: t o t h e v o t e r s a t t h e September primary e l e c t i o n , We urge i n s t e a d t h a t t h e Board of Education d e f e r submission of t h e proposed program, We f u r t h e r urge t h e Minneapolis Board of Education t o take prompt s t e p s t o begin formulation of a comprehensive 15-20 year long-range school m n s t r u c t i o n and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n progrm, which then might be divided i n t o s t a g e s f o r o r d e r l y submission t o t h e voters, 2.

3. I n o r d e r t o expedite the e a r l y submission t o t h e v o t e r s of t h e first s t a g e of a 15-20 years long-range school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program and i n order t o o f f e r g r e a t e r assurance t o t h e v o t e r s t h a t such a p?ogram i s needed, we urge t h e Board of Education t o u t i l i z e the s e r v i c e s of o u t s i d e consultants experienced i n t h e area of school planning,

4. W e urge t h a t i n t h e formulation of a long-range school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program p a r t i c u l a r a t t e n t i o n be d i r e c t e d t o strengthening tk following s e r i o u s d e f i c i e n c i e s i n t h e proposed s-year program: a,

Closer adherence t o t h e p r i n c i p l e of providing a reasonably equal educational opportunity t o each student w i t h i n t h e C i t y of Minneapolis.

b.

Consideration of changes i n present school boundaries as a means o f b e t t e r i w l e m e n t i n g two important objectives: (1) Reducing t h e present s u b s t a n t i a l v a r i a t i o n i n enrollm n t s ammg schools and strengthening t h e enrollment a t the s m a l l e s t schools, p a r t i c u l a r l y a t t h e s e n i o r high l e v e l . We urge that m a t, if not a l l , s e n i o r high enrollments be brought w i t h i n t h e recommended range of 1,000-1,800 students. ( 2 ) Nore e f f e c t i v e u t i l i z a t i o n of the c a p a c i t i e s of e x i s t i n g buildings s u i t a b l e f o r school use.

c.

Closer conformity t o t h e 56-3-3 form of school organization i n separate s t r u c t u r e s u n t i l or u n l e s s t h e long-standing Minneapolis p o l i c y favoring t h i s form i s modified o r replaced with some o t h e r form of school organization,

5. We recognize t h e need t o provide c e r t a i n urgently needed f a c i l i t i e s u n t i l such time a s t h e long-range program can be formulated. During t h i s i n t e r i m and t o the e x t e n t necessary, we urge use of one o r more of t h e following a l t e r n a t i v e ways of meeting t h e s e pressing needs: a.

? r i o r i t y a l l o c a t i o n of t h e annual $2 m i l l i o n bonding author i t y a v a i l a b l e t o t h e Board of M u c a t i o n without referendum approval,

b.

P r i o r i t y a l l o c a t i o n of p a r t of t h e 33 m i l l ($1.3 m i l l i o n ) Repair and Improvement Fund, which i s a v a i l a b l e annually.

c.

Temporary increase i n Fund levy. The Board own maximum m i l l l e v y only t o referenduin by

the 3 i m i l l Repair and Improvement of Education has a u t h o r i t y to s e t its f o r operating expenditures, s u b j e c t petition,

I n urging d e f e r r a l of the proposed program, t h e May 23 r e p o r t s t a t e d : "Our decision t o urge d e f e r r a l of the proposed 5-year school construct i o n and. r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program has been a r r i v e d a t with t h e g r e a t e s t reluctance and only a f t e r t h e most painstaking review of every f a c e t of t h e program, i n t h e hope that a way could be found t o support it e i t h e r as proposed o r with c e r t a i n modifications. Unfortunately, t h e deeper we delved, t h e inore inescapable became our conviction t h a t we cannot i n good armscience support t h e program. It was our f e r v e n t hope t h a t t h e program would be found t o be deserving of support, p a r t l y because of our deep awareness of the c r i t i c a l importance of providing an adequate educational opportlir!.l-ty f o r our children and partljr because of our c l e a r conviction t h a t zn ~ r g e n tneed e x i s t s f o r a s u b s t a n t i a l school construction and rehabilitaLLiou program. Our opposition t o t h i s program marks t h e f i r s t tine s i n c e t h e Citizens League was founded i n 1952 t h a t we have been compelled t o r e j e c t a major proposal f o r financing school needs. "Although our c r i t i c i s m s of the proposed program a r e many, and each is discussed in d e t a i l i n t h i s r e p o r t , they a l l add up t o one simple g e n e r a l conclusion our s i n c e r e conviction t h a t t h e proposed program will not advance, i n f a c t w i l l perhaps r e t a r d , t h e long-range g o a l of providing a

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more e f f e c t i v e school system f o r a l l t h e c h i l d r e n of our community. The proposed program i s severely d s f i c i e n t i n s e v e r a l important respects: (1) The program was not preceded by a thorough review and evaluation of basic educational goals f o r the f u t u r e , nor has t h e r e been a re-examinat i o n nor a reaffirmation of basic school p o l i c i e s . Both a r e e s s e n t i a l p r e r e q u i s i t e s t o the development of a sound long-range school construct i o n and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program. (2) Although t h e program has a f a r reaching impact on major long-range school p o l i c i e s , the program i t s e l f i s not a long-range program. (3) The program v i o l a t e s one of the most f u n d a m n t a l school p o l i c i e s by f a i l i n g t o move in t h e d i r e c t i o n of providI n f a c t , the program aping comparable opportunity f o r each student. pears t o accommodate a n even-wjider i n e q u a l i t y i n the curriculum o f f e r i n g among schools than already e x i s t s . ( ) The program r e j e c t s t h e concept o f changing school d i s t r i c t boundaries a s a means of strengthening enrollments a t the smallest schools, reducing t h e wide v a r i a t i o n in enrollments among schools, and a s a means of b e t t e r u t i l i z i n g e x i s t i n g capacity as a means of r e l i e v i n g overcrowding a t c e r t a i n schools. ( 5 ) The program f a i l s t o provide the degree of documentation and supporting d a t a which is e s s e n t i a l t o reassure the public that wasteful construction and rehab i l i t ion w,ll be avoided. Although the Citizens League, the League of Women Voters, t h e Citizens Committee on Public Mucation and other groups reques+,ed t h a t t h e proposad program be deferred and t h a t a c o n s u l k n t be r e t a i n e d t o aid. i n the formulation of a long-range building prograq t h e Board of Education voted on June 26 b y a 4 t o 3 vote, -to put the $17 millior! bond issue on the September 11 b a l l o t and t o h i r e a consultant t o a i d i n t h e development of a long-range bililding program, P.fter choosing Nichigan S t a t e Univers i t y F i e l d Services as t h e consultant, the Board of Education reversed i t s previous reduced t h e &l7 million portion of p o s i t i o n and on August 3 by a unanimous vote t h e proposed program t o the $5 million proposal nuw before t h e voters.

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By these a c t i o n s the Board of Education has implemented most of the recommendat i o n s of our Nay 23 report. I n effect, t h e $17 million program has been deferred u n t i l the completion of the consult antst contract. (The $5 m i l l i o n program i s being presented a s a f i r s t phase which i s needed t o meet urgent needs.) Also, t h e Board of Education has a c t e d promptly t o begin formulation of a comprehensive 15-20 year long-range school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program, a s suggested i n recommendation 2, and, a s suggested i n number 3, has r e t a i n e d outside consultants t o a i d i n t h i s work. 'The school administration has s t a t e d t h a t f a c t o r s such a s those mentioned i n our recommendation 4 w i l l be considered by t h e consultants. Although t h e School Board and administration have chosen a financing method o t h e r than t h e t h r e e suggested i n our recommendation t o finance urgent school needs, t h e $5 million referendum bond i s s u e appears t o be a v a l i d means of financing these needs.

s

SCOPE OF REPORT The purpose of t h i s report i s t o review and r e p o r t f i n d i n g s on the proposed $5 million school bond issue. The school a u t h o r i t i e s have s t a t e d t h a t th proposed bond i s s u e would be used t o meet t h e immediate building needs of t h e school system by financing the first phase of a school building program. The remainder of t h e program is t o be formulated by t h e School Board and administration with t h e a i d of school planning consultants r e t a i n e d f o r t h i s purpose, The Board of Education has approved t h e general designation and p r e s e n t l y estimated c o s t of the w o j e c t s t o be financed by t h e proposed $,5 million bond issue.

This r e p o r t does not comment on the rethod of issuing the bonds, t h e terms of t h e bonds o r other d e t a i l s of t h e financing of t h e proposed program. The Board of Education has not made a f i n a l determination of t h e s e matters and, therefore, it would appear premature f o r us t o attempt an evaluation of them a t t h i s time. EVALUATION OF THE PROPOSED

$5

MILLION PROGRAM

Our purpose in t h i s s e c t i o n of the r e p o r t i s t o compare t h e $5 million proposal with t h e former $17 m i l l i o n proposal s o a s t o a s c e r t a i n t h e j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r t h e inclusion of each p r o j e c t i n t h e $5 m i l l i o n program. The general i n t e n t of t h e School Board i n reducing the amount of bonding a u t h o r i t y it w i l l ask the v o t e r s t o approve a t t h e September 11primary e l e c t i o n was t o allow t h e m s t urgently needed and l e a s t c o n t r o v e r s i a l p r o j e c t s t o move ahead without delay, while a long-range school construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program is being developed. I n s e l e c t i n g t h e s p e c i f i c p r o j e c t s t o be financed by %he $5 m i l l i o n bond authorization, t h e Board of 7 million Education was r e s t r i c t e d t o those p r o j e c t s which had been included i n t h e a program. Assistant Shperintendent Adner I. Heggerston has explained t h e p r i n c i p l e s which t h e school administration used in the s e l e c t i o n of p r o j e c t s by stating: '!The superin tendent and administrative s t a f f i n preparing the recommendations designating p r o j e c t s t o be included i n t h e first phase were caref u l t o consider p o s s i b l e a l t e r n a t e s o l u t i o n s t o school problems which might be recommended by the survey staff and t o avoid commitments which would prejudge t h e outcome o f t n e survey. A s a r e s u l t of widespread community discussion, areas of agreement and disagreement have been i d e n t i f i e d , The i s s u e s on which t h e r e was disagreement w i l l be t h e subject of p a r t i c u m study by t h e survey team, The items which were designated by t h e Board of Education on August 3 involve work which is needed whatever d i r e c t i o n t h e survey recommendations may point. T k major emphasis w i l l be on moderniz a t i o n and improvement of school f a c i l i t i e s . It has previously been s t a t e d t h a t only a l i m i t e d amount of t h e $17 million program involvesexpansion of f a c i l i t i e s . Bven in the case of the l a r g e r construction projects, t h e major paPt would be used t o provide f a c i l i t i e s p r e s e a t l y needed f o r a balanced educational program b u t which a r e now inadequate o r completely missing. When a building p r o j e c t involves new construction and modernization of e x i s t i n g f a c i l i t i e s , the most e f f i c i e n t building arrangment frequently involves some changes i n present elassroom use. For example, an unders i z e d l i b r a l y , laboratory o r shop may be r e a d i l y adapted t o serve other classroom needs. The exact nature of the new construction w i l l , therefore, depend t o a degree upon t h e a r c h i t e c t u r a l plan lwhich i s developed. It would be unwise t o unnecessarily limit the a r c h i t e c t s by i d e n t i f y i n g e x a c t l y what is t o be included i n t h e new construction. The a r c h i t e c t s s h o u l d b e f r e e t o suggest a l t e r n a t e s o l u t i o n s t o building problems, The amount of money designated f o r each of t h e major p r o j e c t s i s only a p a r t of t h e e s t i n a t e d cost included i n the &l7 million, A l l t h e modernization calmot be c a r r i e d out with t h e amounts which have been suggested. The p r o j e c t s proposed f o r inclusion i n the *5 m i l l i o n program were o u t l i n e d i n t h e presentation t o t h e Board of Education on August 3. The s p e c i f i c designat ions w i l l be determined by the Board when preliminary plans are available. The most urgent bailding needs have been i d e n t i f i e d i n staff

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discussions. Not a l l can be met in the f i r s t phase of the program, but the money w i l l be used t o go a s f a r as possible with the improvements l i s t e d . More precise cost estimates can be made when plans and specifications a r e completed."

I n our evaluation of each project and our determination of whether or not it should be included i n t h e proposed YS million program, we have used the following criteria:

1. The degree t o which each project might c o n f l i c t with possible recommendations which are t o be formulated by the consultants and the degree t o which each might tend t o r e s t r i c t the number of a l t e r n a t e long-range proposals available t o t h e consultants* 2.

The urgency of meeting the need.

Obviously, i f a project i s not needed o r if going ahead a t t h i s time might be inconsistent with the consultants1 recommendations, it c l e a r l y should not be included in -the $5 million program. Two of the three c r i t e r i a used by the school administration in establishing the proposed list of projects are v i r t u a l l y the same as the'above, I n addition t o these two, the school administration also used t h e f o l l m i n g criterion:

"3. Reasonable equity i n d i s t r i b u t i n g funds t o meet the needs of the t o t a l c i t y program." While t h i s c r i t e r i o n probably was considered p o l i t i c a l l y necessary i n order t o diminish the likelihood of an unfavorable vote from those p a r t s of the c i t y which might not receive any of the proposed projects, we do not believe t h a t t h i s should be used as a major t e s t f o r the inclusion o r exclusion of a project i n a city-wide school program. Aside from t h i s t h i r d c r i t e r i o n and we a r e sure t h a t t h i s was considered as only a subsidiary f a c t o r we approve of t h e principles which the administration used t o s e l e c t the projects t o be included i n the &5million program,

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Listed below is a general description, discussion and some conclusions about each of tb projects contained in the $17 million 5-year program and those included i n the $5 million program. Bowever, t h e description of each project i s no more than a directional outline. It does not include a cost estimate f o r each item nor does it include any s p e c i f i c s t a t e m n t t k a t the t o t a l estimate a t each school i s the amount the school administration has calculated t o be the cost of the l i s t e d i t e m s . The school administrat ion, unfortunately, has not released such information and it, therefore, i s very d i f f i c u l t t o reach d e f i n i t i v e conclusions about t h e proposed projects. While the documntation of the bond proposals which would require voter approval has been limited t o a general s t a t e m n t of the needs a t each school, separate amounts have been presented f o r t h e items included i n the 5-year, $10 million r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program which does not require voter approval, The projects which were t o be included i n the former $17 million program and t h e amount which has been allocated t o each of these projects i n the present $5 million proposal are:

- 8 $17,OOO,OOO Program

PRESENT $S,OOOIOOO Program

6 17,000,000

$ 5,000,000

Mashburn High School W r o u g h s Elementary School F i a l d Zlementary School Roosevelt High School North High School Southwest High School Sheridan Junior High School Lincoln Junior High School New South Junior-Senior High School Replacement for Warrington Element a r y School Replacemnt fur Franklin Junior High School Additional Classrooms o r Portables TOTAL

WASHBURN HIGH SCHOOL

(a,000,000

formerly $1,500,000)

PROPCXSZD: The p r o j e c t s previously r e c o m n d e d f o r Washburn i m l u d e d a $1,500,000 addition under the &l7 million program and an a d d i t i o n a l &448,000 f o r r e h a b i l i t a t i o n under the $10 million mn-referendum r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program. The $448,000, t o be spent uver a period of f i v e years, appears t o include such items a s the r e h a b i l i t a t i o n and modernization of th horn economics department, heating and v e n t i l a t i o n system, plumbing, l i b r a r y , administrative s u i t e , and i n d u s t r i a l sducation department. By a t t e n p t i n g t o piece together what remains of t h e general. statement of need at Washburn, we believe the $1,500,000 portion would have provided f o r construction of 101 2 a d d i t i o n a l classrooms, two a u x i l i a r y gyms, shower and locker room f a c i l i t i e s , a band and o r c h s s t r a room, s i x o r e i g h t p r a c t i c e rooms f o r the band and orchestra, an i n d u s t r i a l a r t s shop, an'expanded l i b r a r y , enlarged o f f i c e f a c i l i t i e s , a l i t t l e t h e a t r e , and a f a c u l t y lounge. The sshool administra+,ion has s t a t e d , "The s i t u a t i o n a t Washburn i s becoming c r i t i c a l , and t h i s p a r t i c u l a r p r o j e c t is urgently requested a s No. 1p r i o r i t y of all p r o j e c t s .included i n the proposed 5-year program." This high p r i o r i t y r a t i n g i s based on an e n r o l l m n t of s e v e r a l hundred more than t h e r a t e d capacity of the building, with a f u r t h e r i n c r e a s e in proj-ected enrollment during t h e next s e v e r a l years. The school administration has indicated t h a t a l l of the above except t h e addit i o n a l classrooms, enlarged o f f i c e f a c i l i t i e s , l i t t l e t h e a t r e and f a c u l t y lounge would be included i n the $5 million proposal. DISCUSSIC1J: There appears t o be general qreement t h a t a c r i t i c a l need f o r a d d i t i o n a l classrooms e x i s t s a t Washburn. Rated capacity i s 1,397. Its present enrollment i s 1,732, and school o f f i c i a l s i n d i c a t e i t s peak e n r o l h n t w i l l be almost 2,000 in 1966, There, likewise, appears t o be general agreemnt t h a t Washburn is I n g r e a t need of modernization and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n work. The severe overcrowding a t Washburn can be eliminated i n one o r both of two ways. The $17 million construction program s e l e c t e d t h e a l t e r n a t i v e of constructing t h e necessary a d d i t i o n a l dlassrooms t o handle i t s present and expected growing enrollment.

The school administration s t a t e d t h a t the requested money would have provided f o r the construction of s u f f i c i e n t additional f a c i l i t i e s t o handle adequately an enrollment of 2,000, The a l t e r n a t i v e would be t o consider boundary changes which m u l d reduce enrollment a t Washburn. Sufficient excess ca2acity now e x i s t s a t West and Central High Schools t o handle the problem, but t h i s type of boundary change would r a i s e several d i f f i c u l t problems and c l e a r l y should not be undertaken except a s a p a r t of a t o t a l plan f o r assigning senior high school students throughout the City of Minneapolis. Such a long-range plan might well recommend the construction of a new senior high school i n an area which would allow a coordinated strengthening of t h e enrollment a t each of t h e smallest high schools and the reduction of f u t u r e enrollments a t krashburn. CONCLUSIONS: Until such time a s the consultants can rmke t h e i r long-range r e c o m n d a tions, it would appear unwise t o move ahead t o construct additional f a c i l i t i e s a t Idashburn f o r the i t i d p a t a d f u t u r e enrollment of 2,000. However, it would seem t h a t some permanent enrollment in excess of the r a t e d capacity of the school (1,397) w i l l continue, aven under t h e type of recommendation which would make s u b s t a n t i a l boundary changes. Therefore, since the school administration has indicated t h a t under t h e @ million program the capacity at Washburn would not be increased beyond t h a t school present e n r o l h n t and t h a t none of the work t o be done a t Washburn under t h i s program would prejudice e i t h e r of the a l t e r n a t i v e s mentioned above, we approve t h e allocation of funds t o meet Washburn's urgent needs. l'he a l l o c a t i o n f o r this purpose of t1,000,00~ appears t o be j u s t i f i e d . BURRIUGHS ELFJGXTARY SCHO3L ($75,000 formerly d100,000) FROPOSED: I n both instances, the proposed expenditure i s t o finance the f i n a l stage of a several.year progrm t o increase the capacity of Burroughs School and t o provide certain f a c i li t i es . DISCUSSION: Commitments t o complete the work have been made and t h e e n t i r e project is expected t o be completed during 1363. The $25,000 reduction was apparently the r e s u l t of a reduced estimate and does not indicate a reduction i n the amount of work t o be done. CONCLUSIONS: There appeahs t o be no doubt but t h a t the f u l l amount proposed f o r Burroughs should be included i n the 45 million program. Undoubtedly, this project w i l l be b u i l t i n 1963 regardless of the f a t e of the bond issue.

FIELD ELE1ZNTARY SCHOOL ($300,000 formerly the same) PROPOSED: The work proposed a t Field under the million program i s the sane as t h a t which had been proposed under the h.17 million. The proposed addition would replace fear wooden portable classrooms used since 1923 with four new permanent classrooms, and i n addition would provide a library, l i b r a r y workroom, multi-purpose room f o r xnusic, student. lunches and storage, and new administrative o f f i c e f a c i l i t i e s . The project i s j u s t i f i e d on t h e basis of continuous administration recommendations since 1954 t o replace the o l d portable classrooms and on the basis of a need t o provide other f a c i l i t i e s in a more advantageous l o c a t i o n i n the structure, Administration enrollment projections indicate t h a t Field i s presently s l i g h t l y crowded and t h a t enrollment during the next s e v e r a l years w i l l continue t o be s l i g h t l y i n excess of i t s r a t e d ca2acity of 540.

DISCUSSION: Without cpestion, the wooden portables should be abandoned a t some e a r l y date. The s i t u a t i o n a t F i e l d i s not urgent i n since t h e disco,nfort a t Field ha8 been l i v e d with f o r a good many years.

The two elementary schools bordering F i e l d on tine e a s t an6 th south have room f o r a d d i t i o n a l pupils. The proposed new Warrington School which, i f constructed, would border F i e l d on the m r t h and west, could reduce t h e enrollment pressure on Field. It i s possible t h a t the t o t a l review of t h e elementary school system in Minneapolis might recommend replacement of t h e wooden portables a t F i e l d and t r a n s f e r of some pupils t o other schools. This would e l i i i n a t e most of the need f o r construct i o n of t h e addition a t Field. CONCLUSIONS:

The proposed p r o j e c t a t F i e l d does not q u a l i f y under the d e f i n i t i o n of

an urgent need, and it might c o n f l i c t with recammendations contained in t h e expected long-range program. heref fore, while i t might be preferable t o hold up work & Field, i t is unlikely t h a t s e r i o u s o r i r r e p a r a b l e harm would r e s u l t from including the proposed $300,000 addition in t h e

$5

million program,

R00SEVELT HIGH SCHOOL ($500,000 formerly $1,500,000) The 617 million program included a $1,'500,000 addition at Roosevelt and t h e r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program included an a d d i t i o n a l $689,000. Thus, the t o t a l proposed expenditures f o r Roosevelt during t h e next f i v e y e a r s would have been $2,189,000. PROPOSED:

'&.lo m i l l i o n non-referendum

I n general, it would appear t h a t the b689,000 was t o finance r e h a b i l i t a t i o n and modernization of f a c i l i t i e s i n the present building such a s homemaking l a b o r a t o r i e s , i n d u s t r i a l shops, t h e heating and v e n t i l a t i n g system, kitchen serving l i n e , t h e teachers' lunchroom, t h e g i r l s ' physical educational department and locker rooms, the communication system, a c o u s t i c a l treatment, and the construction of f i r e towers. L i s t e d a s additional needs a t Roosevelt a d t h e r e f o r e presumed t o have been included i n the &1,500,000 proposed ad& t i o n was an addition t o provide immediate classrooms f o r an a n t i c i p a t e d l a r g e r enrollment and a l s o t o provide a d d i t i o n a l f a c i l i t i e s f o r i n d u s t r i a l arts, home economics, science and physical education, and the modernization of the a&.inistrative o f f i c e space. O f these projects, the b5 million program would allow f o r the construction of t h e f i r e towers, modernization of shower and locker rooms, new biology l a b o r a t o r i e s , and some modernization of t h e i n d u s t r i a l arts department. I n short, t h e $%0,000 would be used primarily f o r t h e no6ernization of f a c i l i t i e s and not f o r expansion.

DISCUSSIOX: Roosevelt, which has a r a t e d capacity of 2,110 is the l a r g e s t s e n i o r high school i n Minneapolis. Its peak estimated enrollment, expected t o be reached in 1963, i s 2,h87, and i t s enrollment would then decrease sonewhat t o 2,377 i n 1966. The a d d i t i o n a l classrooms proposed i n the $217 million program were j u s t i f i e d a s being needed t o serve t h i s a d d i t i o n a l enrollment.

t

Long-range enrollment projections a t Ftoosevelt i n d i c a t e t h a t the s t r u c t u r e w i l l have t o handle bwtween 250 and 300 pupils over i t s r a t e d capacity, but t h e r e i s some reason t o believe t h e administration's enrollment projections f o r t h e Roosevelt High a r e a a r e s l i g h t l y optimistic. School administrat ion f i g u r e s i n d i c a t e t h a t students residing i n a 50-block a r e a i n t h e present South High d i s t r i c t a r e allowed t o exerc i s e an option of going t o Roosevelt. Apparently, 112 South Senior High students a r e p r e s e n t l y exercising t h i s opt ion. I n a d d i t ion, we understand t h a t app o x i m t e l y 15 students resicling in t h e Washburn d i s t r i c t a r e exercising a similar option. Also, approximately 30 t u i t i o n p u p i l s from the Fort Snelling a r e a p r e s e n t l y a t t e n d Roosevelt. &h of these f a c t o r s tends t o put a damper on t h e need t o provide a d d i t i o n a l c l a s s room c a p a c i t y a t Roosevelt

.

Added t o the f a c t o r s discussed above is the need f o r a long-range policy with respect t o whether the smallest senior high schools should have t h e i r enrollments strengthened. I f the consultants make t h i s type of recomndation, then it i s l i k e l y t h a t the type of boundary changes which would be made w i l l reduce the enrollment at Roosevelt, t b r e b y eliminating the need f o r a l l o r most of the proposed expansion a t Roosevelt. CONCLUSIONS: Ide believe t h a t the school administration acted wisely i n no% a l l o c a t i n g any funds within the $5 million program f o r increased capacity a t Roosevelt. The prospects are too great t h a t preferable ways t o overcome these problems w i l l be recommended. The projects which w i l l be undertaken a t Roosevelt i f the $5 million bond i s s u e is approved are unrelated t o ca?acity and, therefore, the allocation of $90,000 t o Roosevelt appears t o be justified.

NORTH HIGH SCHOOL ($500,000 formerly @, 500,000) PROPOSED: I n addition t o the $1,500,000 which had been allocated t o North as a p a r t of the previous $117 million pkogram, &490,000 of the non-ref erendum &lo million bond issue was scheduled t o be spent a t t h a t school f o r items silch a s r e h a b i l i t a t i o n of the l i b r a r y , home economics department, i n d u s t r i a l education departmnt physical educat i o n department,and health department, and work on the ventilation, tenperature aontrol and communications systems. The $1,500,003 appeared t o inclucie provision of up t o ten additional academic classrooms, additional. a u x i l i a r y gyms, two health classrooms, showers, lockers, training rooms, drying rooms, new band and orchestra rooms, practice rooms f o r t h e musical g r o q s , choir rooms, music l i b r a r y space, expansion of the auto shops, new equipmnt f o r the machine shops, expansion of the metal shops, a new elect r i c shop, a l i t t l e theatre for drama and play production work, three biology rooms, equipment f o r the business department, expansion of the a r t rooms, relocation of t h e library, expansion of the administrat h e off i c e f a c i l i t i e s , expansion of t h e nurse's office, expansion of the counseling area, and f a c u l t y lounges.

,

The proposed improvements were based generally on (1) an anticipated increased enrollment over t h e present rated capacity of the building, and ( 2 ) needed rehabilit a t i o n and modernization and provision of additional f a c i l i t i e s t o provide an improved curriculum offering.

A s i n the case of Roosevelt, t h e $5 million bond funds would not be used t o increase capacity a t North but would only be used t o modernize existing f a c i l i t i e s including the biology laboratories, home economics rooms, music rooms a d the i n d u s t r i a l arts shops. DISCUSSION: The present r a t e d capacity a t North High i s 1,781, and l a t e s t enrollment f i g u r e s show 1,667 pupils. Future enrollment project ions indicate a peak enrollment i n 1964 of 2,086, with substantially the same number i n 1966. Host of the indicated enrollment increase a t North i s predicated on expected urban renewal program and a subsequent change in the land use i n t h a t part of t h e City. Much uncertainty e x i s t s about future population predictions i n the North area. For example, the urban renewa l programs which were c i t e d as j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r providing additional capacity a t North w i l l f i r s t r e s u l t i n the tearing down of houses, t o be followed l a t e r by the construction of new buildings. No c l e a r timetable f o r these programs has y e t been established, nor have they been spelled out by the Housing and Redevelopment Authority. Neither have they been submitted to, nor approved by, the City Council. The general r e s u l t i n most urban renewal areas which do not include public housing and no is public housing i s proposed for t h i s new urban renewal area i n North Minneapolis f o r the new 'land use t o r e s u l t in less school age children than before the land was

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cleared, Also, as houses a r e being t o r n d o ? . , i t would seem t h a t the enrollnent a t North w i l l d i p p r i o r t o any possible increase. For these reasons, the school admin i s t r a t i o n ' s p m j e c t i o n s of increased enrollment a t North appear somewhat speculat i v e and r a t h e r optimistic. Even if t h e administration s enrollment projections should prove accurate, t h e r e would appear t o be good cause f o r holding up p l m s t o provide a d d i t i o n a l capacity a t North u n t i l the t o t a l high school s i t u a t i o n can be reviewed by the consultants, Henry High, immediately t o the north of North High, is one of the smaller senior high schools, and a long4range program could conceivably recommend strengthening t h e enrollment a t Henry. Any boundary change t o accomplish t h i s would reduce the e n r o l l ment a t North. J

The North High s i t u a t i o n is a l s o caught up i n two o t b r basic school p o l i c y i s s u e s which must be resolved before a meaningful long-range construction program can be formulated. F i r s t , Henry is a combination junior-senior high, and it i s p o s s i b l e t h a t it w i l l not be desirable t o continue it a s a combination school contradictory t o t h e t r a d i t i o n a l ~ 6 - 3 - 3 form of school organizat ion. Second, the junior high e n r o l l ment a t Henry i s l e s s than 500, the smallest junior high enrollment i n t h e City. Olson Junior High t o the north of Henry a l s o has a comparatively small enrollment of 600. Two other jcnior highs i n north Minneapolis, Jordan and Lincoln have enrollments i n excess of 1,000. The proposed construction of a new Franklin Junior High in North Minneapolis would serve approximately 600 pupils. Certainly, it was wise t o postpone the decision t o construct classrooms t o provide a d d i t i o n a l capacity a t North u n t i l a f t e r t h e conpletion of t h e c o n s u l t a n t ' s review of the whole secondary school s i t u a t i o n i n North kEnneapolis. CONCLUSIONS: Again a s i n the case of Roosevelt, we approvs of the decision t o postpone the construction of a d d i t i o n a l capacity a t North u n t i l the consultants have had an opportunity t o prepare t h e i r recommendations f o r a long-range program f o r t h e C i t y ' s secondary schools. A l l of the work which would b e done a t North udder the $5 million program is appa.rently needed and the a l l o c a t i o n o f $90,000 t o t h i s school seems appropriate. SOUTHWF,ST HIGH SCHOOL ($300,000 fonnerly the same) PROPOSED: Apparently, t h e s a m work w i l l be accamplished a t 'Southwest under t h e $5 million program a s had been proposed under the 4.7 m i l l i o n proposal. The amount designated f o r Southwest would provide a s u i t a b l e auditorium with a u x i l i a r y f a c i l i t i e s such a s dressing rooms, s t a g e , l i g h t i n g and auditorium s e a t i n g and would a l s o provide f o r the modernization of the l i b r a r y . An additional. $12h,000 was scheduled and presumably s t i l l is scheduled f o r Southwest under the $10 m i l l i o n on-referendum program t o provide a language laboratory and other f a c i l i t i e s .

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The s t a t e d j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r these p r o j e c t s is t o meet t h e a n t i c i p a t e d increased enrollment and t o provide f a c i l i t i e s which w i l l enable t h e offering of an improved curriculum. DISCUSSION: There appears t o be l i t t l e doubt but t h a t the e n t i r e $300,000 proposed f o r Southwest should be included i n t h e b5 m i l l i o n program. The r a t e d capacity f o r Southwest is 1,516; present enrollment exceeds t h i s by approximately 100; and f u t u r e enrollment projections i n d i c a t e t h a t by 1966 t h e enrollment could exceed r a t e d capac i t y by nearly 300 pupils. Should t h i s happen, - t h e r e i s some doubt t h a t the proposed program w i l l prove adequate. I n f a c t , t h e $~00,000 f i g u r e was based on e a r l i e r enrollment projections which indicate t h a t capacity would be exceeded by only 100 pupils, r a t h e r than t h e nearly 300 now envisioned,

CONCLUSIONS: We concur with t h e school achninistration t h a t t h e f u l l $300,000 should be included i n t h e $5 m i l l i o n program. We a r e advised t h a t , from a l e g a l standpoint, no more than $,.300,0OO could be a l l o c a t e d f o r Southwest, i r r e s p e c t i v e o f any new showi n g of g r e a t e r need, SHERIDAN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL($200,000 formerly $j~00,000) PROPOSED: The $500,000 f i g u r e which was proposed f o r Sheridan under t h e $17 m i l l i o n program would have provided f o r instrumental and vocal music f a c i l i t i e s , an a u d i t o r i y t o s e a t one-half t h e student b d y ( t h e e n t i r e junior high), an a d d i t i o n a l science laboratory, a l a r g e c a f e t e r i a , an a u x i l i a r y gym, h e a l t h classrooms, colnmunity room f acil i t i e s , a f a c u l t y lounge, a l i t t l e t h e a t r e , a school employeest restroom, shower fac i l i t i s s f o r c a f e t e r i a and c u s t o d i a l staff, f o u r o r f i v e a d d i t i o n a l classrooms, and mohrnized o f f i c e f a c i l i t i e s . Added t o t h i s $5OO,OOO was t h e proposed expenditure of $190,000 :or o t h e r noderanization and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n work under t h e $10 m i l l i o n nonreferendum program. The program f o r Sheridan was j u s t i f i e d on t h e b a s i s ( 1 ) t h a t t h e s t r u c t u r e was o r i g i n a l l y constructed daring t h e depression and t h a t f o r t h i s reason a nuniber of needed f a c i l i t i e s have never beell provided, and ( 2 ) t h e r e is some crowding a t Sheridan which might be somewhat i n t e n s i f i e d by p r o j e c t e d i n c r e a s e d enrollments, m i l l i o n program w i l l n o t provide The $200,000 a l l o c a t e d t o Sheridan i n t h e i~f; f o r auy o f t h e junior high f a c i l i t i e s . The decision t o b u i l d these T a c i l i t i e s has been d e f e r r e d u n t i l t h e consultant has completed h i s recommendations. The $200,000 probably would be used f o r t h e modernization of classrooms, renovation of t h e heating and v e n t i l a t i n g systems and grounds improvements, DISCUSSION: There appears t o be l i t t l e doubt but that c e r t a i n normally provided junior high f a c i l i t i e s are n o t p r e s e n t l y a v a i l a b l e a t Sheridan. However, Sheridan p r e s e n t l y is a combination elementary-junior high school, a combination which i s g e n e r a l l y looked on w i t h disfavor by all educational l e a d e r s , It would seem most unwise t o move ahead and construct the type of j u n i o r high f a c i l i t i e s recommended i n t h e $17 m i l l i o n program u n t i l such time a s a p o l i c y d e c i s i o n i s reached t o continue Sheridan a s a combination elementary-junior high school. There a r e a number of o l d schools i n t h i s p a r t o f n o r t h e a s t Minneapolis w i t h considerable excess capacity, and some long-range decision must be made with r e s p e c t t o t h e f u t u r e of these schools. Marshall, which is a comb i n a t i o n junior-senior high school, borders on Sher idan, and any long-range decision with r e s p e c t t o the f u t u r e of Marshall might w e l l have a c l o s e r e l a t i o n s h i p on t h e f u t u r e of Sheridan. Thus, it i s p o s s i b l e t h a t the f u t u r e use of Sheridan might be t o serve as a ( 1 ) continued combination elementary-junior high, (2) j u n i o r high, ( 3 ) elementary school. Sheridan has a present enrollment of a p p r o x i m t e l y 500 element a r y p u p i l s and j u s t aver 600 junior high students. Rated c a p a c i t y of t h e School is . 450 elementary p Q p i l s s. .d junior high students. The school a d m i n i s t r a t i o n r s fit u r e enrollment p r o j e c t i o n s suggest the p o s s i b i l i t y of around 850 elementary p u p i l s , However, a review of th a d m i n i s t r a t i o n l s own f i g u r e s does not seem t o s u b s t a n t i a t e t h i s prediction. The 1966 enrollment estimates i n d i c a t e elementary enrollment of 517 and s e c o n d a y enrollment f o r t h a t y e a r is n o t exgected t o exceed r a t e d capacity, CONCLUSIONS: W e agree t h a t t h e $5 m i l l i o n program should not include any f i n d s f o r t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f Junior High School f a c i l i t i e s a t Sheridan and t h a t such construct i o n should be postponed u n t i l t h e c o n s u l t a n t s have completed their work. There does not appear t o be a r e a l urgent need f o r most of t h e work which w i l l be done a t Sheridan under t h i s program but, s i n c e a l l of t h e s e improvemnts w i l l have t o be done sometime, we do not o b j e c t t o t h e i n c l u s i o n of these p r o j e c t s ,

LINCOLN JUPJiOR HIGfi SCHOOL ($;300,000 f o m ~ r l yt h e same) EROF9SED: Under t h e $5; m i l l i o n program, t h e same work w i l l be done at Lincoln as had been proposed under t h e $17 m i l l i o n program. The proposed expenditure of $,300,000 a t Lincoln would allow conversion of twelve undersized classrooms i n t o nine of l a r g e r s i z e . It would a l s o provide f o r such additional f a c i l i t i e s a s music, dramatics, speech, a r t , p h y s i c a l education and other s p e c i a l deprtments. This program i s essent i a l l y one o f r e h a b i l i t a t i o n , t o gether with provision of additional f a c i l i t i e s and l a r g e r classrooms, and has l i t t l e r e l a t i o n s h i p t o provi-addikional capacity f o r any increased enrollment. DISCUSSION: The r e a p p a r s lit t l e doubt b u t t h a t any long-range c om t r u c t i o n and reh a b i l i t a t i o n program would recommend most of the it ems included i n this project. On t h e other hand, t h e r e would.appear t o be no g r e a t sense of urgency t o undertake t n i s work i n advance of the long-range program, Proposed expenditures a t Lincoln do not involve basic p o l i c y considerations a s a t other schools;-such a s minimum school s i z e and f orrn of school organization. CONCLUSIOIC3: The e n t i r e $300,000 proposed f o r Lincoln may be included in t h e 4 6 m i l l i o n program w i t h reasonable assurance t h a t it % r i l l not c o n f l i c t w i t h any recomrnendat ions which might be made by t h e consultants.

'NEW SOUTH JUNIOH-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (deleted f orrnerly $5,000,000) PROPOSED: struction l y i n the program. and would

The $~,000,000 which would have been spent f o r s i t e a c q u i s i t i o n and conof a new combination South junior-senior high school t o be l o c a t e d generalv i c i n i t y of the present Seward Elementary School has been d e l e t e d from t h e The proposed school would have had a t o t a l capacity of between 1,200-1,700 g e n e r a l l y have served t h e present South High d i s t r i c t .

The primary justif'ication for the proposed new junior-senior South High School was t h e obsolescence o f t h e e x i s t i n g s t r u c t u r e , South High i s the o l d e s t s e n i o r high i n Minneapolis and, if it is t o be retained, would r e q u i r e s o m t h i n g i n excess of $500,000 i n r e h a b i l i t a t i o n work, Also c i t e d as a j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r t h e new school i s t h e p o s s i b i l i t y t h a t t h e South High a t h l e t i c f i e l d might be taken a t some l a t e r date f o r highway purposes, t h e f a c t t h a t the present South High w i l l n o t be c e n t r a l l y located once planned freeways a r e constructed, the f a c t that t h i s a r e a needs t h e psychological l i f t t h a t would accrue from a new structure, and t h e d e s i r a b i l i t y of consol i d a t i n g a l l j u n i o r high s t u d e n t s i n t o a s i n g l e school. Presently, Seward Elementary School includes t h e 7th and 8 t h grade. DISCUSSIOM: South High is the oldest high school building i n Minneapolis, having been i n i t i a l l y constructed in 1892, and is without question i n the poorest p h y s i c a l condit i o n of any of t h e high schools, Whether i t can o r should be r e h a b i l i t a t e d a t a c o s t somewhat i n excess of !$5OO,OOO and used f o r some a d d i t i o n a l time i s a d i f f i c u l t quest i c n t o answer. Were t h e condition of the s t r u c t u r e t h e only question. involved, t h e r e i s a s t r o n g l i k e l i h o o d t h e recommendation would be t o r e h a b i l i t a t e t h e strucdbure. Only t h e o l d e s t s e c t i o n of t h e building was constructed before 1900. Much of t h e b u i l d i n g c o n s i s t s of additions put on during t h i s century, and a considerable p a r t of t h e building has been r e h a b i l i t a t e d . More than $?500,000, f o r example, has been spent on r e h a b i l i t a t i o n and modernization work in South High during t h e p a s t decade. School administration spect t o t h e specffic a r e a CSBC r e p o r t envisioned i t s cept f o r t h e p o s s i b i l i t i e s

o f f i c i a l s were extremely d i f f i c u l t t o p i n down with rewhich would have been served by the proposed' school. The serving e s s e n t i a l l y t h e present South High d i s t r i c t , ext h a t t h e boundaries adjacent t o Roosevelt might be expand-

a d somewhat and t h a t those South High students l i v i n g west of the r a i l r o a d t r a c k s and near the Central High boundary could have been reassigned t o Central. When school administration o f f i c i a l s attempted t o defend t h e s i z e of t h e proposed new school, t h e y seemed t o i n d i c a t e t h a t the newschool would serve e s s e n t i a l l y t h e e x i s t i n g South High d i s t r i c t , including those students nearest Central, and t h a t some Roosevelt s t u d e n t s would be added, together with some from Sanford Junior High and F h i l l i p s J u n i o r High, &re recently, the administration o f f i c i a l s moved c l o s e r t o the CSBC recommendations that p u p i l s west of t h e r a i l r o a d t r a c k s and near t h e C e n t r a l High boundaries should he reassigned t o Central. Without question, the present South junior high enrollment i s poorly d i s t r i b u t e d i n t o f o u r d i f f e r e n t s t r u c t u r e s , Some &tend Sanford, some go t o t h e South High s t r u c t u r e , some a t t e n d P h i l l i p s , and some attend Sewardts 7th and gth grades, There appears t o be g e n e r a l agreement t h a t a long-range construction program should provide more adequate f a c i l i t i e s f o r junior high school students i n t h e South area. However, t h e proposed c o n s t r ~ c t i o nof a combinakion school i n t h e Seward a r e a raises s e v e r a l important and b a s i c policy questiolzs and t h e answers t o these should d e f i n i t e l y aw a i t the c m s u l t a n t s f review of t h e e n t i r e secondary system in Minneapolis. These include (1) a new 3outh junior high would c l e a r l y be s a l e r than i s desirable; ( 2 ) the school would be a combination Sunior-senior high, which v i o l a t e s t h e t r a d i t i o n a l Board of Education p o l i c y of K6-3-3 form of school organization; ( 3 ) construction of the new South junior nigh would r e s u l t i n considerable excess capacity a t both Sanf o r d and P h i l l i p s J u n i o r HigZas. Assuming t h a t t h e e x i s t i n g South High s t r u c t u r e i s t o be abandoned, one i s s t i l l not driven inescapably t o the conclusion t h a t a new Bouth High should be constructed i n the Seward area. This proposal r a i s e s important p o l i c y i s s u e s which must await coordination w i t h the formulation of a long-range construction programfbr secondary schools. These i s s u e s include: (1) The f a c t t h a t t h e new South High would be another s m l l school. (2) The f a c t t h a t the school m u l d be a combination juniorseliior high. ( 3 ) The f a c t t h a t construction of a new South in the Seward a r e a dooms Marshall t o i t s present small enrollment o r l e s s and, therefore, t o a r e l a t i v e l y i n f e r i o r curriculum which could only be corrected by a much g r e a t e r per student expenditure than a t o t h e r l a r g e r schools, or i t w i l l mean t h e eventual abandonment of Marshall. ( ) Construction of a new South High i n t h e Seward a r e a a l l b u t prevents strengthening t h e enrollment at two o t h e r small s e n i o r highs, Central and West. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed construction of a new South Junior-Senior High School was unquestionably t h e most c o n t r o v e r s i a l s i n g l e p r o j e c t i n t h e 617 million; -program, since i t involved by f a r t h e most important policy issues. The need t o replace t h e present South High i s c e r t a i n l y not urgent, nor i s t h e r e any problem of overcrowding beyond t h e capacity of the e x i s t i n g s t r u c t u r e . Therefore, we agree with t h e school administ r a t i o n t h a t no funds should be included i n the $5 million program'for any p a r t of t h e construction o f t h i s p r o j e c t which c e r t a i n l y should not be undertaken u n t i l a longrange construction program f o r secondary schools has been formulated. REPLACEPiE5,'T FOR WARRINGTON ELEMENTARY SCHCOL ($200,000 f o r m r l y $1,500,000) PROPOSJD: Under the wl7 million program, t h i s p r o j e c t envisioned t h e replacement of t h e present Warrington EZEemntary School s t r u c t u r e with a new school a t an unspecified l o c a t i o n somwhere t o t h e south and e a s t of the present building which would have served generally t h e p u p i l s p r e s e n t l y attending Warrington. It i s l i k e l y t h a t some of the present Varrington p u p i l s l i v i n g on the west and north f r i n g e of t h e d i s t r i c t would have been reassigned t o o t h e r elementary schools, and thak some s t u d e n t s l i v i n g

j u s t t o the south and e a s t of the present Warrington boundaries would have been reassigned t o the new Warrington. The new school was expected t o serve between 500 and 600 elementary pupils, a number s u b s t a n t i a l l y t h e saxe a s t h o s e served by tk present structure. The primary j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o t t h i s p r o j e c t was: (1) The present Warrington s t r u c t u r e i s one o f t h e older elementary schools in the C i t y and i f it is not replaced it must l ~ v es u b s t a n t i a l r e h a b i l i t a t i o n and modernization. (2) The present s t r u c t u r e shares a s i t e with Bryant Junior High, and the a v d l a b l e p l a y g m d space is f a r too small. By t e a r i n g down t h e Warrington s t r u c t u r e , t h i s a d d i t i o n a l space would be m d e available f o r Bryant Junior High. (3) Socio-economic f a c t o r s d i c t a t e the d e s i r a b i l i t y of constructing a new school ssmwhat t o t h e south and e a s t of t h e present s i t e , Theestimated cost of t h e proposed new school would lmve been approximately $750,000 f o r s i t e acquisition and an equal a d d i t i o n a l amount f o r construction of t h e school. The school administration has s t a t e d t h a t t h s $200,000 a l l o c a t e d t o IJarrington i n t h e proposed $5 million programwould permit study of t h e elementary school needs i n t h e Warrington a r e a and would make it possible t o begin s i t e acquisition i f the consultants should recommend e i t h e r e q a n s i o n of t h e present s i t e or relocation, but i f , as a r e s u l t of the collsult ants recomendations, an a l t e r n a t e p l a n f o r providing elementary school f a c i l i t i e s i n t h i s a r e a were adopted, the money c o u l d b e used i n a manner consistent with such an a l t e r m t e plan. DISCXSSIOIq: I n view of the extensive r e h a b i l i t a t i o n work which has been, and i s being aone a t othJer schools which a r e older than Warrington and i n s u b s t a n t i a l l y t h e same physical condition, i t i s &oubtful t h a t t h e recommendation t o replace r a t h e r than reh a b i l i t a t e Marrington can be sustained on this basis alone. It was c m t r u c t e d i n 1898, and tffere a r e a t l e a s t 27 elementary schools older t h a n Warrington, most of which a r e being r e h a b i l i t a t e d . However, continued use of the school w i l l require subs t a n t i a l e x p e ~ d i t u r e sf o r r e h a b i l i t a t i o n , During the p a s t decade only $71,000 has been spent f o r r e h a b i l i t a t i o n purposes a t Warrington, which i s l e s s than has been spent during the same period f o r almost any o t h e r qlementary school i n the C i t y of comparable age. The school administration' s 1954 20-year long-range construction program made no mention of replacing Warrington, and its recommended replacement seems q u i t e inconsistent wit'n t h e recommendations f o r r e h a b i l i t a t i o n of other compara b l e schools thnroughout t h e City. The problem of inadequate playground space f o r both I.!arrington and Bryant Junior High could be resolved more economically by acquiring a d d i t i o n a l land adjacent t o the two schools. A n u d e r of p o s s i b i l i t i e s e x i s t f o r such additional acquisition of land and a t a t o t a l c o s t s u b s t a n t i a l l y l e s s than the $750,000 estimated f o r s i t e a c q u i s i t i o n f o r t h e new Warrington. It. i s doubtful t h a t t h i s f a c t o r played a very i n f l u e n t i a l r o l e i n determining tk decision t o c o n s t r u c t a new school. Probably the most s i g n i f i c a n t consideration which l e d t o t h e recommendation t o construct a newG?arrington is t h e so-called socio-economic f a c t o r . The present Warrington school i s s i t u a t e d i n the most concentrated minority r a c i a l group r e s i d e n t i a l a r e a i n the C i t y of I%nneapolis, which doubtless i s t h e socio-economic f a c t o r r e f e r r e d t o by school administration o f f i c i a l s . The recommendation would appear t o be based on the hope t h a t r e l o c a t i o n of t h e school would diminish somewhat the high proportion of minority group enrollment or, perhaps, the hope t h a t a new s t r u c t u r e would p l a c a t e s u b s t a n t i a l l y t h e objections of this minority group t o attending a somewhat segregated school.

The r e l o c a t i o n of Warrington sonewhat t o the south and e a s t of i t s present locat i o n w i l l have considerable inpact on o t h e r schools adjacent t o Warrington. For example, Agassiz and Lyndale t o t h e e a s t and north a r e a l r e a d y crowded, and it would be exceedingly d i f f i c u l t f o r e i t h e r t o absorb any Warrington pupils. F i e l d Elementary School t o t h e south and Bancroft t o t h e e a s t might w e l l be affected, a s would Mann. Any s i g n i f i c a n t boundary changes t o t h e south would r e l i e v e any overcrowding a t F i e l d Elementary School and might w e l l make unnecessary t h e proposed $300,000 a d d i t i o n a t t h a t school. CONCLUSIONS: I n view of t h e my complex i s s u e s involved i n making the decision of t h e f u t u r e disposi3ion of Warrington, good sense would seem t o d i c t a t e t h a t any f i n a l decision should be h e l d i n abeyance u n t i l t h e long-range construction program can be formulated. We b e l i e v e t h a t t h i s has been done i n the proposed $5 million program, REPLACEMENT OF FRANKLIN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ($800,000 f o m r l y $3,500,000) PROPOSZD: The $17 m i l l i o n program included an expenditure of $3,500,000 f o r replacing t h e e x i s t i n g Franklin Junior High s t r u c t u r e with a new junior high with capacity f o r approximately 600 p u p i l s on a new but unspecified s i t e . The general consensus appeared t o place t h e l i k e l y new s i t e a s adjacent o t t h ret p r e s e n t H a l l Elementary School, whick: ~ replacenent of t h e i s n o r t h and west of the present Franklin 8 i h . l l proposed e x i s t i n g Franklin s t r u c t u r e was j u s t i f i e d on the b a s i s (1) t h a t t h e building i s t h e o l d e s t junior high i n Minneapolis and t h a t i t s r e h a b i l i t a t i o n c o s t s would be excessive; (2) 3s present l o c a t i o n i s not c e n t r a l f o r the f i b r e enrollment it w i l l serve, Under t h e $5 million program, $800,000 has been a l l o c a t e d f o r s i t e a c q u i s i t i o n f o r t h e new Franklin Junior High School. DISCUSSION: Without question, Franklin Junior High i s the o l d e s t junior high in kinneapolis =d i t is i n t h e most rundown condition of any junior high. However, t h e generally r e f e r r e d t o construction d a t e of 1874 i s somewbf!i misleading. Almost t h e e n t i r e s t r u c t u r e burned t o t h e ground in 1912 and was r e b u i l t in 1917. Subsequently, an a d d i t i o n was added on t h e n o r t h end of the building. It seems agreed that t h e s t r u c t u r e i t s e l f i s generally sound, and i f i t s e x i s t i n g s i t e were c e n t r a l l y l o c a t e d i t would appear l i k e l y t h a t the r e c o m n d a t i o n would be t o r e h a b i l i t a t e r a t h e r than replace Franklin, This building is p r e s e n t l y i n shameful condi ti on, having been allowed t o d e t e r i o r a t e badly during t h e p a s t decade, The e x i s t i n g s t r u c t u r e w i l l not be c e n t r a l l y l o c a t e d f o r the enrollment it w i l l serve i n t h e f u t u r e . The building w i l l be on t h e south and e a s t corner of the dist r i c t . A s i t e adjacent t o t h e H a l l Qemntary School would c l e a r l y be more desira b l e from a l o c a t i o n standpoint. The land i n t h e a r e a of the Hall School is l o c a t e d i n a l i k e l y urban renewal p r o j e c t planned f o r an e a r l y date, and it is p o s s i b l e t h a t construction of t h e new school could b e coordinated with the urbaa renewal project. There i s no urgent need t o replace Franklin Junior High a t t h i s time, except f o r t h e poor condition of the building due t o neglected maintenance. The school i s not crowded beyond i t s capacity. However, it appears l i k e l y t h a t any long-range school construction program which w i l l be formulated will include abandonment of the present structure. CONCLUSICNS: Althougfi t h e r e is no urgent need t o include funds f o r replacem n t o f Franklin i n the $5 million program, an a l l o c a t i o n of $800,000 f o r s i t e a c q u i s i t i o n is probably merited on the b a s i s t h a t t h e r e is l e s s l i k e l i h o o d t h a t t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l be inconsistent with the formulation of a long-range school construction program %kin most of the o t h e r s included i n t h e $17 m i l l i o n program,

ADDITIONAL CLASSROOMS OR PORTAELES ($825,000 formerly $1,000,000) PROPOSED: The $17 million program i n & uded a t o t a l of $1 r i l l i o n f o r e i t h e r permanent additions o r portable classrooms f o r numerous s p e c i f i e d elementary schools which a r e o r w i l l be overcrowded. Under the $5 millioil program, t h i s has been reduced t o $825,000 f o r t h e same purposes. The funds were n o t and a r e not a l l o c a t e d s p e c i f i c a l l y tio any of the l i s t e d schools, nor has a decision been made with respect t o whether t o c o n s t r u c t a permanent a d d i t i o n o r portable classrooms a t any o f the schools, The schools l i s t e d a s needing one o r t h e o t h e r type of additional capacity include Kenwood, McKinley, H a l l , Hay, Harrison, Lind, S c h i l l e r , Pierce, Agassiz, Douglas, h e l l , Willard, Ksewadin, Minnehaha, Cooper, Greeley, Irving, Longfellow, Seward, Fulton, Lake H a r r i e t and Waite Park, DISCUSSION:

Inclusion of almost the t o t a l $1million proposed f o r permanent additions o r classrooms t o elementary schools seems advisable f o r s e v e r a l reasons, There appears t o be a compelling need t o construct permanent additions a t Kenwood, McKinley and H a l , and t h e t o t a l c o s t of these t h r e e additions alone m u l d use up a s u b s t a n t i a l proportion of the funds, Construction of portable classrooms at other ebmentary schools where needed would not c o n f l i c t with long-range decisions which would be included i n t h e formulation of a new construction and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n program. Finally, t h i s item i s l e s s r i g i d than any o t h e r s p e c i f i c p r o j e c t included i n ths $17 million program, and t h e r e f o r e the Board of Education could maintain a much more f l e x i b l e p o s i t i o n on how s p e c i f i c a l l y tb apportion allocat ion of the $825,000, CONCLUSIOIq:

We approve of t h e inclusion of t h i s $825,000 i n the $5 million program,